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Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

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camp-n-family

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Posted: 02/17/21 07:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

naturist wrote:

It seems very few run up against max tow weight before running out of payload. You are not alone there. BTW, don’t forget to add the weight of a full tank of fuel to the weight of passengers, etc. At 7.2-7.4 lbs per gallon, a 20 gallon tank is going to add around 150 lbs to the mix.


Curb weight already accounts for full fluids, including fuel. It does not need to be subtracted from payload.


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packpe89

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Posted: 02/17/21 09:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What is the length?? I have found that as much a concern as the weight, especially if you plan on any long distances. Not sure I would want over 24' or so with a Durango.

kbucky

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Posted: 02/17/21 09:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

packpe89 wrote:

What is the length?? I have found that as much a concern as the weight, especially if you plan on any long distances. Not sure I would want over 24' or so with a Durango.


We were looking at a bigger one but now we are looking at this one:
https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/travel-trailers/cruise-lite/261BHXL/734

It is 29" including the hitch. Its about 1500 lbs lighter than the first one we looked at

otrfun

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Posted: 02/17/21 09:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The OP's biggest problem is verifying all his/her ratings/weights. A lot of assumptions being made (payload, tonque weight, dry weight, loaded weight, receiver hitch rating, RAWR, etc.). I may have missed it, but I don't believe the OP has one capacity, rating or weight that's actually been verified (verified = TV VIN related data and/or Cat Scale ticket). Even the dry weight of 5,900 lbs. quoted for the camper is suspect. I've seen these dry weight stickers be off as much as 1,000 lbs. Many dry weight quotes (especially brochures) are with *zero* options, no propane tanks, no batteries, etc.

With lighter TV's like the Durango, tongue weight is critical. Realworld, loaded tongue weight can easily be 50-75% more than the dry tongue weight rating specified on the typical manufacturer's brochure.

Prior to a visit to a Cat Scale, everyone's rig is riding on a long laundry list of assumptions. I can't tell you how many times I've seen someone's jaw drop (mine included) after taking their rig to the scales the first time. The best approach is to be extremely conservative. In the RV world, if you look anything remotely "close" on paper, you're probably over---possibly way over.

With all this being said, I commend the OP for starting this thread---and asking all the right questions. Hopefully this thread will prevent the OP from making some of the same mistakes that some of us here have made in the past.

Grit dog

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Posted: 02/17/21 09:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:

Somebody mentioned options; I know we are not talking about vehicles in this class, but the point still stands.
The last year they where available a friend bought 2 LTL9000 Fords. Ordered the same axles, drivetrain and beds. Only difference, other than color was his driver wanted the extra padding, carpet, and seat covers so 1 had XL trim, and the other was XLT. I was in the scalehouse the first morning they brought the trucks to work. The fancy interior added over 1000 lbs of MT weight The cab of a 9000 is not much, if any, bigger than regular cab F150. If you want max payload/tow capacity you need base level interior.


Uhhh. Who cares?


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Grit dog

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Posted: 02/17/21 10:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ok, 90% of the replies here don’t even really understand what vehicle the OP actually has.
It has pluses and minuses for the application the OP is considering.
That vehicle will handle a 7000lb trailer pretty well and have power and brakes for days.
However that vehicle is NOT made to handle a 7000lb trailer per se.
Aside from taking a $60k hot rod suv and beating on it with a big trailer attached, most notably I believe you’ll tear up the rear Bilstein ADS suspension by bouncing a big trailer off the back of the rig. It’s a sports car suspension not a truck suspension.

That said, properly setup it should tow well. I’m just very skeptical about the application vs the type of suspension. Have owned 2 different SRT8s and understand their systems pretty well.

Be prepared for increased wear and tear if it works is my only advice.

kbucky

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Posted: 02/17/21 10:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

otrfun wrote:

The OP's biggest problem is verifying all his/her ratings/weights. A lot of assumptions being made (payload, tonque weight, dry weight, loaded weight, receiver hitch rating, RAWR, etc.). I may have missed it, but I don't believe the OP has one capacity, rating or weight that's actually been verified (verified = TV VIN related data and/or Cat Scale ticket). Even the dry weight of 5,900 lbs. quoted for the camper is suspect. I've seen these dry weight stickers be off as much as 1,000 lbs. Many dry weight quotes (especially brochures) are with *zero* options, no propane tanks, no batteries, etc.

With lighter TV's like the Durango, tongue weight is critical. Realworld, loaded tongue weight can easily be 50-75% more than the dry tongue weight rating specified on the typical manufacturer's brochure.

Prior to a visit to a Cat Scale, everyone's rig is riding on a long laundry list of assumptions. I can't tell you how many times I've seen someone's jaw drop (mine included) after taking their rig to the scales the first time. The best approach is to be extremely conservative. In the RV world, if you look anything remotely "close" on paper, you're probably over---possibly way over.

With all this being said, I commend the OP for starting this thread---and asking all the right questions. Hopefully this thread will prevent the OP from making some of the same mistakes that some of us here have made in the past.


My listed payload is 1200 lbs (although that appears conservative as my calculations would have it closer to 1500 lbs). The hitch weight of the camper we are now looking at is 450 lbs and myself and family would add another 500 lbs. So that would give me 250 lbs for the increase in hitch weight with a loaded camper. Still seems tight but better than the first option we were looking at.

otrfun

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Posted: 02/17/21 10:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

kbucky wrote:

otrfun wrote:

The OP's biggest problem is verifying all his/her ratings/weights. A lot of assumptions being made (payload, tonque weight, dry weight, loaded weight, receiver hitch rating, RAWR, etc.). I may have missed it, but I don't believe the OP has one capacity, rating or weight that's actually been verified (verified = TV VIN related data and/or Cat Scale ticket). Even the dry weight of 5,900 lbs. quoted for the camper is suspect. I've seen these dry weight stickers be off as much as 1,000 lbs. Many dry weight quotes (especially brochures) are with *zero* options, no propane tanks, no batteries, etc.

With lighter TV's like the Durango, tongue weight is critical. Realworld, loaded tongue weight can easily be 50-75% more than the dry tongue weight rating specified on the typical manufacturer's brochure.

Prior to a visit to a Cat Scale, everyone's rig is riding on a long laundry list of assumptions. I can't tell you how many times I've seen someone's jaw drop (mine included) after taking their rig to the scales the first time. The best approach is to be extremely conservative. In the RV world, if you look anything remotely "close" on paper, you're probably over---possibly way over.

With all this being said, I commend the OP for starting this thread---and asking all the right questions. Hopefully this thread will prevent the OP from making some of the same mistakes that some of us here have made in the past.
My listed payload is 1200 lbs (although that appears conservative as my calculations would have it closer to 1500 lbs). The hitch weight of the camper we are now looking at is 450 lbs and myself and family would add another 500 lbs. So that would give me 250 lbs for the increase in hitch weight with a loaded camper. Still seems tight but better than the first option we were looking at.
You can accurately (and easily) determine the realworld payload of your Durango on your own. Visit a scale with your Durango empty (with driver on-board) and a full tank of fuel. Subtract that scale weight from the GVWR posted on the door jam of your Durango. The difference is the realworld payload you have available to use. This number trumps *any* number you may get from a brochure, the door jam payload sticker, and/or any VIN related data from the manufacturer. Reason being, dealer/owner installed accessories or modifications change the orginal manufacturer's payload rating. For instance, our neighbor's truck originally had a door jam payload rating of 4,150 lbs. Through the years he's installed in-bed 5r/gooseneck rails, air bags, sway-bar, step-bars, aftermarket front bumper, etc. His payload is now 3,675 lbs. (GVWR minus empty weight). The weight of those mods add-up.

Grit dog

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Posted: 02/17/21 11:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Figure 7000lbs and 800lb + hitch weight for the 261 you’re considering.
And let us know how it goes!

RoyJ

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Posted: 02/17/21 01:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

C&D measured a 2018 SRT at 5457 lbs. Using 7100 as GVWR, that's 1643 lbs of payload.

I highly doubt you can pile on enough options to reach 5900 lbs in a Durango. So true payload is much higher than the 1200 listed on the doorjamb.

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