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Open Roads Forum  >  Around the Campfire  >  Sports

 > A little lighter subject to discuss

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Guy Roan

Florida

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Posted: 02/18/21 11:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I want one of you bicyclists to tell me why every time I get a flat tire it is in the rear wheel where I have to put the bike upside down, do much cursing and get all kinds of black gunk on my hands before getting the chain off, the tire loose, the old tube out, the new tube in, the chain back on the little gear and then back on the bike. I call it "Murphy's flat rear tire wheel rule"

Then to top it all off; on yesterdays flat after going through all the nonsense above when I turned the bike back up the wheel fell off.
Duh! I forgot to tighten the threaded nut and close the little quick release lever

Can any of you other cyclists relate ?

Guy

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 02/18/21 11:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Call yourself lucky, rear flats are easier to control than front flats.

Seattle Steve

Tucson

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Posted: 02/18/21 12:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've had the same experience. My theory is most of the weight is carried on the rear wheel since the rider is sitting directly over it, so it is easier for thorns, etc to pierce the tire.

way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 02/18/21 01:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The rear tire of a bike simply wears faster. On my road bikes I go through 3x as many rear tires than fronts. Braking, fast take-offs, climbing hills and the majority of the weight is largely focused to the rear wheel. But as another poster said, flats in the rear are much easier to handle and far less dangerous while the bike is in motion than a front flat. You may want to look at the PSI in your tires. Bike tires should be checked and inflated on every ride due to the rate at which they lose air. Bike tubes/tires are light to save weight and thus thinner and more porous. Add to it the low volume of air to begin with and psi lowers quicker. Low air is the number one cause of flats on bikes. Mainly due to pinch flats/snake bites and wear on the inside. I usually run max PSI unless I am on a trail or someplace I need the extra grip from a lower pressure. Decent tubes and fresh tires also help.


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p220sigman

Tallahassee, FL, USA

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Posted: 02/18/21 01:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As was said, most of the weight ends up on the rear tire because you sit closer to directly over it than the front wheel. Additionally, think about if you approach something like a curb that you are going to ride over, you end up unweighing the front wheel by pulling up on the bars and potentially pedaling to further lighten the front. Most people will then hit the curb with the rear wheel at or near full weight (a prime source of pinch flats). Some riders are able to shift their weight forward before the rear tire strikes and essentially lift the rear tire up onto the curb, but most don't practice enough to have that kind of bike/body control.

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 02/18/21 01:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The worst is not having enough glue on the front rim and rolling the tire off the rim in a turn. I didn’t have this happen but have seen it happen.

way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 02/18/21 01:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BCSnob wrote:

The worst is not having enough glue on the front rim and rolling the tire off the rim in a turn. I didn’t have this happen but have seen it happen.


One of the reasons I never road tubulars. That and fixing a flat mid ride.

Side note, we used to live in Middletown until a few years ago. Small world.

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 02/18/21 02:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I found the ride on tubulars more comfortable than clinchers when I was racing amateur and for Clemson. The sidewalls have more give with tubulars than clinchers at the same psi (rolling resistance).

Have you done the assault on Mt Mitchel?

fj12ryder

Platte City, MO

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Posted: 02/18/21 02:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Motorcyclists run into this a lot. FWIW, in all my years of riding, 55+, I've only had one front tire flat. All the others were rears. The consensus seems to be that the front tire kicks up the object and positions it for the rear to run over. Sounds as reasonable as anything else. [emoticon]


Howard and Peggy

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PawPaw_n_Gram

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Posted: 02/18/21 02:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fj12ryder wrote:

The consensus seems to be that the front tire kicks up the object and positions it for the rear to run over. Sounds as reasonable as anything else. [emoticon]


I see that on my TT, more tire punctures on the rear axle, and my vehicles over the years (50+)


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