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Open Roads Forum  >  Around the Campfire  >  Sports

 > A little lighter subject to discuss

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way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 02/18/21 02:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BCSnob wrote:

I found the ride on tubulars more comfortable than clinchers when I was racing amateur and for Clemson. The sidewalls have more give with tubulars than clinchers at the same psi (rolling resistance).

Have you done the assault on Mt Mitchel?


Yeah, I've heard tubulars are like butter. Haven't done Mt Mitchell - yet to make it over that way. Harp Hill was always a right of passage in the valley when I lived there. That and Coxey Brown. We used to live up near 77, so any ride I had was climbing home (Wolfesville, 77, Catoctin Hollow, Hamburg, etc. Civil war century hit a lot of nice climbs. One of the few things I miss about Middletown. All flat land here at the beach. But Some killer SORBA single-track courses. Riding a fatty on the beach is a different experience. 4-6 psi - talk about self steer.


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BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 02/18/21 02:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wolfesville Is a nice area. Our farm is just south of Myersville (Milt Summers and Mt Tabor). I gave up riding after moving to MD; I found the roads to dangerous. The roads around Clemson had a lot less traffic.

Did you know the Bussards on Harp Hill Rd?

* This post was last edited 02/18/21 03:11pm by BCSnob *   View edit history

Guy Roan

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Posted: 02/18/21 04:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

way2roll wrote:

The rear tire of a bike simply wears faster. On my road bikes I go through 3x as many rear tires than fronts. Braking, fast take-offs, climbing hills and the majority of the weight is largely focused to the rear wheel. But as another poster said, flats in the rear are much easier to handle and far less dangerous while the bike is in motion than a front flat. You may want to look at the PSI in your tires. Bike tires should be checked and inflated on every ride due to the rate at which they lose air. Bike tubes/tires are light to save weight and thus thinner and more porous. Add to it the low volume of air to begin with and psi lowers quicker. Low air is the number one cause of flats on bikes. Mainly due to pinch flats/snake bites and wear on the inside. I usually run max PSI unless I am on a trail or someplace I need the extra grip from a lower pressure. Decent tubes and fresh tires also help.


I noticed you are from Wilmington, NC - Do they still have the "tin man " triathlon there . I did that in my previous younger life and really enjoyed it.

Guy

Guy Roan

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Posted: 02/18/21 04:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

p220sigman wrote:

As was said, most of the weight ends up on the rear tire because you sit closer to directly over it than the front wheel. Additionally, think about if you approach something like a curb that you are going to ride over, you end up unweighing the front wheel by pulling up on the bars and potentially pedaling to further lighten the front. Most people will then hit the curb with the rear wheel at or near full weight (a prime source of pinch flats). Some riders are able to shift their weight forward before the rear tire strikes and essentially lift the rear tire up onto the curb, but most don't practice enough to have that kind of bike/body control.



This is a road bike with 700 x 23 tires - I don't jump curbs

Guy

Guy Roan

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Posted: 02/18/21 05:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BCSnob wrote:

I found the ride on tubulars more comfortable than clinchers when I was racing amateur and for Clemson. The sidewalls have more give with tubulars than clinchers at the same psi (rolling resistance).

Have you done the assault on Mt Mitchel?


Between Mt Mitchell and Bridge to Bridge -17 times.( in my previous life)
I once was lucky enough to be on the starting line with George Hincapie.
I used to train on the Blue Ridge parkway.

Guy

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 02/18/21 05:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In a past life our amateur team rode with the women’s national team several times when they were training in SC one summer. Several rides from Clemson SC to Cashiers NC and back.

kellem

Shenandoah valley,VA

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Posted: 02/18/21 08:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Go tubeless and never look back....Stans or orange seal.

down home

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Posted: 02/18/21 11:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It's because of torque pedaling and shifting thrust from right to left while peddling especially if you are trying to climb a hill or something.The rear tire even gets a bit warmer than the front.
It's been a long time since I had a bike. It was heavy with cast iron front section with two springs suspension on the front forks and three speed hub.
I had some big legs from peddling that things. Tires were made a bit heavier back then,than the now ubiqutous Chinese tires and used tubes to boot.
And weight of rider is mostly on the rear tire,I think.

* This post was edited 02/19/21 12:32am by down home *

wa8yxm

Davison Michigan (East of Flint)

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Posted: 02/19/21 04:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The answer is simple.. The rear tire carries more weight than the front. That simple

NOTE.. Does not matter if you are 300 pounds like me or 90 pounds the rear tire carries more weight.. Make sure it is properly inflated.


Home was where I park it. but alas the.
2005 Damon Intruder 377 Alas declared a total loss
after a semi "nicked" it. Still have the radios
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way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 02/19/21 06:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BCSnob wrote:

Wolfesville Is a nice area. Our farm is just south of Myersville (Milt Summers and Mt Tabor). I gave up riding after moving to MD; I found the roads to dangerous. The roads around Clemson had a lot less traffic.

Did you know the Bussards on Harp Hill Rd?


Don't know the Bussards. I know where your farm is. My son went to Lucy school (and my wife taught there) just down the road. Very small world.

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