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Yosemite Sam1

Under the pines.

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Posted: 02/19/21 09:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My thoughts and prayers to Texans.

Can somebody tell me though why their water pipes are in their ceiling?

And I understand they had this deep freeze in 1977. So why did not bother and someone in state leadership teach them to winterize or empty their water pipes?

* This post was edited 02/19/21 09:50am by an administrator/moderator *

PA12DRVR

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Posted: 02/19/21 09:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It does sound like Texas went on the cheap as far as winterizing all of their power sources, but that doesn't mean the solution is to surrender control to the feds.

When I lived in Texas, all of my subdivision and all of surrounding subdivisions (to the best of my knowledge) were built slab-on-grade...so the water, gas, and often power would run up to the attic / 2nd story where the mechanical equipment (other than the outside components of the A/C) was located and then be distributed from there.

As far as Alaska, every day during the week I look out and see several wind turbines happily spinning away, but on the location, there are always 2-3 that aren't spinning: probably routine downtime, but who knows?

Every weekend, I also drive by what is probably close to an acre of solar panels. Currently covered in snow....like they have been since mid-November except for a week or so in January when they were covered with ice after a thaw-freeze cycle. I can't speak to the efficiency or reliability of the wind turbines but they were put in with grant money, not with operating funds, so that makes me wonder about the economics. I can say with some degree of certainty that the acre solar grid ain't producing jack and hasn't since last summer.

* This post was edited 02/19/21 09:50am by an administrator/moderator *


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BCSnob

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Posted: 02/19/21 09:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RE: plumbing in ceilings
Construction can vary by region and time frame; some regions often have houses on full basements, others on crawl spaces, and some on slabs. I also suspect a lot of houses built shortly after ww2 were on slabs.

Yosemite Sam1

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Posted: 02/19/21 09:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BCSnob wrote:

RE: plumbing in ceilings
Perhaps houses in Texas are built on concrete slabs instead of on crawl spaces or basements.


Mine is slab too, but water pipes run on the walls and very near floor level.

Yosemite Sam1

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Posted: 02/19/21 09:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

PA12DRVR wrote:

It does sound like Texas went on the cheap as far as winterizing all of their power sources, but that doesn't mean the solution is to surrender control to the feds.


What's the non-intuitive wisdom of not connecting it to national grid so that other states with surplus can supply your lines with electricity in state-wide disasters like these?

BCSnob

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Posted: 02/19/21 09:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yosemite Sam1 wrote:

BCSnob wrote:

RE: plumbing in ceilings
Perhaps houses in Texas are built on concrete slabs instead of on crawl spaces or basements.


Mine is slab too, but water pipes run on the walls and very near floor level.
Preferred construction methods did change with time and local zoning (if there was any).

way2roll

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Posted: 02/19/21 09:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Due to the infrequency rate which these things happen, building codes in TX don't exist to compensate for this kind of weather. And most builders aren't going to do anything in excess of code that costs them money and infringes on their margin. You could certainly takes steps to mitigate these issues, or have a builder do it for you but it costs money. But builders aren't going to do anything they don't have to. 100 year flood plains are another example in areas hit by Hurricanes. Sure floods can happen, but the likelihood is less so codes aren't developed and enforced to protect the homeowners. Due to the increase in recent years of catastrophic events, lots of areas are updating building codes and flood plains. It simply costs the Homeowners, insurance companies as well as the government too much money to fix everything when it does happen. And it's happening more frequently.


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BCSnob

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Posted: 02/19/21 10:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yosemite Sam1 wrote:

PA12DRVR wrote:

It does sound like Texas went on the cheap as far as winterizing all of their power sources, but that doesn't mean the solution is to surrender control to the feds.


What's the non-intuitive wisdom of not connecting it to national grid so that other states with surplus can supply your lines with electricity in state-wide disasters like these?
The ideology of states rights won over accepting federal oversight that came with interconnectivity to the national grid (based upon comments published by previous TX admins and grid admins).

8.1 Van

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Posted: 02/19/21 10:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

PA12DRVR wrote:

It does sound like Texas went on the cheap as far as winterizing all of their power sources, but that doesn't mean the solution is to surrender control to the feds.

When I lived in Texas, all of my subdivision and all of surrounding subdivisions (to the best of my knowledge) were built slab-on-grade...so the water, gas, and often power would run up to the attic / 2nd story where the mechanical equipment (other than the outside components of the A/C) was located and then be distributed from there.

As far as Alaska, every day during the week I look out and see several wind turbines happily spinning away, but on the location, there are always 2-3 that aren't spinning: probably routine downtime, but who knows?

Every weekend, I also drive by what is probably close to an acre of solar panels. Currently covered in snow....like they have been since mid-November except for a week or so in January when they were covered with ice after a thaw-freeze cycle. I can't speak to the efficiency or reliability of the wind turbines but they were put in with grant money, not with operating funds, so that makes me wonder about the economics. I can say with some degree of certainty that the acre solar grid ain't producing jack and hasn't since last summer.



Wind Turbines Help Power Alaska Through Harsh Winters

[image]


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Etstorm

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Posted: 02/19/21 10:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My understanding is a different type of gear oil for the wind turbines (likely cheaper) is used in Texas due to the high Summer heat but freezes when cold.

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