RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Will a 100 watt solar panel be enough

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tech Issues

Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Will a 100 watt solar panel be enough

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
CA Traveler

The Western States

Senior Member

Joined: 01/03/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/20/21 02:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP Posting information on your truck, RV, batteries, charger will get you better responses.

Yes modern vehicles do limit battery charging as it's all about meeting EPA mileage requirements. If that is your case then with adequate wiring and a DC-DC booster the RV battery can be charged and the electronics will kick up the alternator output the same as turning on the headlights, A/C etc.


2009 Holiday Rambler 42' Scepter with ISL 400 Cummins
750 Watts Solar Morningstar MPPT 60 Controller
2014 Grand Cherokee Overland

Bob


2oldman

NM

Senior Member

Joined: 04/15/2001

View Profile


Online
Posted: 02/20/21 03:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Darklock wrote:

No TV without generator or shore power.
I prefer an inverter.

Darklock

Georgia

New Member

Joined: 01/06/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/20/21 03:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

Darklock wrote:

please correct me if I'm wrong, (it is the internet, so I'm sure someone will), I read that while driving, modern alternators put out only a small trickle charge once TV battery is fully charged. And that with distance from alternator and small gauge wiring, there is minimal charge getting to trailer battery. Originally I assumed that the truck would keep camper charged, but what I have read has told me otherwise.
There will not be 8 hours driving, probably no more than four hours any day. Probably spending two to three days at a time at each destination. Some stops will be with hook ups others just boondocking, so I need enough to not kill my battery.


Hi Darklkock,

You are correct--but there is a way to fix the problem. You do have to throw some money at it. Use a dc to DC charger.

Get one of these:

https://www.amazon.com/Renogy-Battery-Ba........79&sprefix=Renogy+20a%2Caps%2C399&sr=8-3

Place it after the charge solenoid on the "house" side.

This website may give a better understand of solar and has a good spreadsheet that may be used for an energy audit.

https://freecampsites.net/adding-solar/

Thanks, have not heard of these

vermilye

Oswego, NY, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 08/11/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 02/20/21 03:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Darklock wrote:

Our plans are for spending a month or two next winter in south Texas and Arizona, trying to stay where it is warm enough not to need furnace. If nights are cold and we need to run furnace, we do have a Honda generator for use if needed, but since a lot of our days are spent out roaming we need something passive for general use that also charges while on the road. I always thought that while towing, the vehicle would keep the charge up, but recently learned that this not the case. Still learning about the whole camper thing.


You may want to plan on running your furnace during a winter in the Southwest or in the Texas Rio Grande area. Last winter in Quartzsite, AZ, I set my thermostat at 58°F and went through a 20 pound tank of propane every two weeks for much of December & January. As to power, while I don't run a generator, I have a pair of 100 amp hour lithium batteries & 480 watts of solar. This is in a 21' fiberglass trailer - not the best insulated, but fairly small. It was rare to run the furnace during the day, but the nights get cold!


Jon Vermilye My Travel Blog
My Photo & RV link blog


jdc1

Rescue, Ca

Senior Member

Joined: 05/30/2011

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/20/21 04:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Get the second solar panel (200 watts total) and battery. And, get a Mr. Buddy heater. You'll be set for anything. I don't even bother to plug in half the time I have full hook-ups.

Darklock

Georgia

New Member

Joined: 01/06/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/20/21 04:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

just measured things. Thanks to the WDH i do not have room for a second battery without getting a new tray made that would sit up higher.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

Senior Member

Joined: 12/18/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/20/21 04:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Darklock,

Since there is no room for a 2nd battery, then look at either LiFePo4, or for 1/2 the price SiO2.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, soon to have SiO2 batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

Trackrig

Spent the summer in Conconuly, Wa, MH now in Vanco

Senior Member

Joined: 05/15/2011

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/20/21 10:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Solar panels are cheap. If you're going to go to the effort of installing one, take an extra 30 minutes and install a second one.

Solar power is like horse power and torque, you can never have too much of it.

Bill


Nodwell RN110 out moose hunting. 4-53 Detroit, Clark 5 spd, 40" wide tracks, 10:00x20 tires, 16,000# capacity, 22,000# weight. You know the mud is getting deep when it's coming in the doors.


dieseltruckdriver

Black Hills of SD

Senior Member

Joined: 08/24/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/20/21 10:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have to agree with adding a second 100 watt panel. I thought I could make it on 100 watts of solar, but it just wasn't enough. With 200 watts in the summer with high sun and little furnace use, it was easily enough. I now have 420 watts and only have to run the generator if it is very cold and the furnace usage is very high. We can watch as much tv and use everything that we want, except the microwave and air conditioner. I am going to add at least two more 100 watt panels to make up for the very cloudy days.

The lack of battery capacity works against your setup, so more solar helps even more. Another "side effect" of having more solar, is more shade on your roof in the summer sun, keeping things a little cooler inside.


2000 F-250 7.3 Powerstroke
2018 Arctic Fox 27-5L


profdant139

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 11/14/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/20/21 10:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Darklock, I agree that you should get as much solar as you can. Having said that, and for whatever it is worth, we get along just fine with a 120 watt portable panel and two group 31 batteries. We almost never run the generator, and we mostly boondock and dry camp.

But there is a catch -- we are minimalists when it comes to electricity usage. Not everyone wants to live in such a semi-Spartan fashion!


2012 Fun Finder X-139 "Boondock Style" (axle-flipped and extra insulation)
2013 Toyota Tacoma Off-Road (semi-beefy tires and components)
Our trips -- pix and text
About our trailer
"A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single list."


Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Will a 100 watt solar panel be enough
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tech Issues


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.