RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: parking on hill

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > parking on hill

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
time2roll

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/21/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 03/05/21 07:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Need to evaluate the use of the entire yard to determine where to go and where to stop on this.
Need better pictures to give more comments on the wall.


2001 F150 SuperCrew
2006 Keystone Springdale 249FWBHLS
675w Solar pictures back up

afidel

Cleveland

Senior Member

Joined: 12/23/2016

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/05/21 07:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Oh, and word of warning, the ties are really heavy, we used 4 men (1 68 year old in good health, 2 40 year olds, and a 19 year old) and some ratchet straps to carry and set them into place safely. We used a post hole digging bar to move the pieces around on the pile and to help position them together.

I drove the pipe with a post driver and finished with a sledge hammer to get them flush.

Also, pay the extra for construction grade ties, no sense saving 20% and having it fall apart prematurely.

* This post was edited 03/05/21 08:02pm by afidel *


2019 Dutchman Kodiak 293RLSL
2015 GMC 1500 Sierra 4x4 5.3 3.42 long bed
Equalizer 10k WDH


SDcampowneroperator

South Dakota

Senior Member

Joined: 01/25/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 03/05/21 09:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

leveling a pad on such a slope will take retainer walls or a whole lot of fill to slope the pad to the land. Only you can judge costs and labor.
When We owned the camp. we used many a grade 2 RR Tie, tie back anchors, rebar, timber screw.
We borrowed from there. bought from them, dug and buried scrap to get fill and topsoil.
I get it, your toughest issue is not the retainer, but to fill it from where? Fill can be free or $$$

nickthehunter

Southgate, MI

Senior Member

Joined: 07/18/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/06/21 06:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reinforced earth walls Clicky
More info Clicky 2

LVJJJ

NW WASHINGTON

Senior Member

Joined: 12/29/2006

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 03/06/21 08:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I park my TT on 2x12's, would be a more solid base to screw into. for a short term solution maybe stack 3 or 4 2x12's, screwed together to raise the tires, dig the front in so they are level.


1994 GMC Suburban K1500
2005 Trail Cruiser TC26QBC
1965 CHEVY VAN, 292 "Big Block 6" (will still tow)
2008 HHR
L(Larry)V(Vicki)J(Jennifer)J(Jesse)J(Jason)

JRscooby

Indepmo

Senior Member

Joined: 06/10/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/06/21 08:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

afidel wrote:

Oh, and word of warning, the ties are really heavy, we used 4 men (1 68 year old in good health, 2 40 year olds, and a 19 year old) and some ratchet straps to carry and set them into place safely. We used a post hole digging bar to move the pieces around on the pile and to help position them together.

I drove the pipe with a post driver and finished with a sledge hammer to get them flush.

Also, pay the extra for construction grade ties, no sense saving 20% and having it fall apart prematurely.


IMHO, the best way to handle ties is with a machine. I used a Bobcat, but never had a thumb on my hoe.
RR replaces ties about every 15 years or so. At my age that might not be a issue, but I would want it to last past my lifetime. Wall blocks on a footing, and put in right might be a better deal.
Often when somebody is talking about a new TV, they are told to think about next trailer. Building a RV garage, same advice. Would that not apply here?
You will want the base of the wall below existing grade, unless you put compacted fill behind it. For a temporary (few years) you might stack a tie on top of a couple of others in a pyramid crosswise behind where tires are now. Then lay 2 pair for ramps under tires, with the uphill end dug into the grade so don't push them when getting on. This would lift the back axle about a foot and half, and give you something solid to park on.

afidel

Cleveland

Senior Member

Joined: 12/23/2016

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/06/21 03:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RR ties have a functional life of ~40 years after the RR is done with them, even being a relatively young RVer that's probably plenty =)

As far as using a bobcat, that's fine if you have $600 for a 2 day rental.

JRscooby

Indepmo

Senior Member

Joined: 06/10/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/06/21 05:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

afidel wrote:

RR ties have a functional life of ~40 years after the RR is done with them, even being a relatively young RVer that's probably plenty =)

As far as using a bobcat, that's fine if you have $600 for a 2 day rental.


Maybe in some places, but I delivered ties for walls as late as 2010, that have serious issues.
As for somebody that has never spent time on 1 renting a Bobcat for a small job like that, it often does not save money. Average small machine (Not talking about the little stand up) has a bucket that is 5 ft wide. Do you know how to pick up a 8+ foot long tie and carry it? Maybe renter can fill between the walls, but does he know how to do it so he doesn't have ruts under wheels next fall?
If a load takes more than 2 to pick it up, it is pretty dangerous for 3 to handle. When we where loading the truck, or deciding what size machine to use for a bundle, the average tie the RR sold would be about 180

Timmo!

Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 03/10/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/07/21 10:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would use 6x6 instead of 4x4 as your "chock". When backing up my TT over a concrete street curb, I used 4x4 blocks as a "baby step" and the TT tires easily backed up over the 4x4 blocks and up and over the curb.

Second observation, after a good rain, expect some ground settlement at key contact points.

I love seeing Can Do in action.


(Formerly known as SPRey)
Tim & Sue
Hershey (Sheltie)
2005 F150 4x4 Lariat 5.4L 3.73 Please buy a Hybrid...I need your gas for my 35.7 gallon tank!
2000 Nash 19B...comfortably pimped with a real Queen Size Bed


Sobro

Nashville

New Member

Joined: 03/20/2021

View Profile



Posted: 03/20/21 11:34am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree that the bottom layer of PT 6x6 (don't bother with RR ties, they're heavy, dirty, and you need a chainsaw to cut them) should be below grade. In fact, you need to dig about two inches deeper than the 5-1/2 inch tall 6x6 and fill the bottom two inches with gravel for drainage underneath and the gravel helps with leveling that first 6x6. It takes a long time to get the first one because you have to be very fussy about drainange and level.

You'll need to remove the top layer of organic-filled soil from the entire landing pad site so it doesn't compost and settle over time.

If you are only going three feet high, you don't need deadmen, which are 6x6's set perpendicular to the wall length in roughly the middle of the height of the wall. You can use a garden hose with water in it as a level to determine just how tall your wall has to be at the back. Just Google how to do what the Egyptians did with their garden hoses [emoticon] A string level will also work.

Use a drill with a long bit to bore a hole in the 6x6 and a sledgehammer to pound rebar through the first 6x6 at least 1 foot into undisturbed ground. Mark the outside of the 6x6 with a pencil where each rebar went so you don't accidentally try to drive a long screw or another rebar into an existing one from a 6x6 above (ask me how I know).

Stagger your joints as you go up, of course. I would backfill with gravel so drainage isn't a problem. The gravel should be typical road basecourse for your area. It will drain just fine when compacted without using larger sized stones.

Add your backfill 6 inches at a time (called a "lift") and compact that lift before adding more. You'll have to rent a vibratory plate compactor or a high school student wielding a hand plate compactor and you can also drive a vehicle over the parts you can reach to speed compaction along.

Go ahead and backfill up to where you think the concrete slab will be and use it as just a gravel top for a year so that everything has a chance to settle before you pour concrete.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > parking on hill
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.