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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  Class C

 > Class C that's easy to fix?

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time2roll

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Posted: 04/07/21 03:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Belts, hoses, water pump, spark plugs will probably last 15+ years so get a newer one.
This equipment reliability has really improved over the last few decades.


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theoldwizard1

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Posted: 04/07/21 04:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ford E-series with the new V8 engine has a lot more room than the old V10.

Grit dog

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Posted: 04/07/21 05:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A few things to consider. And yes I read you other thread too.
1. You're planning on full timing in this and not for recreational purposes (primarily). Class Bs and Sprinter conversions are very small. Not great bang for the buck for someone who's parking it. (Although you did allude to stealth camping it, so if that's the case then a white Sprinter with no windows is the most incognito, lol).
2. Most class C's are **** near the same from a mechanical standpoint.
You have a traditional Ford or Chevy V8 or a Ford V10. All are about as reliable as any Ford or Chevy pickup. Concentrate on floorplan, price, size and your credit issue, not ease of wrenching on them. No clear advantages or disadvantages to any of them and frankly some things are more accessible with a doghouse than a traditional truck front clip.
3. You don't say what you have for a vehicle, and your "budget" and wants/needs is kinda scattered. But, presume you need a vehicle for transportation and a RV to live in. And it's not like you're chock full of resources and tools if you're in an apartment/RV. AND you said your ultimate setup is a 5th wheel. I'd be much more inclined to get a TT or 5ver and a truck, than a motorhome. Mohos are better suited for people on the road all the time with their RV. If that's you, great. If not, a truck and trailer are one less drivetrain to own or maintain.
4. Cost. Sounds like you're doing ok, but not wiping your @ss with dollar bills. A new RV will depreciate more than a used one. Any RV will deteriorate and or show obvious signs of use being parked outside 24/7 and lived in full time. No sense in buying brand new just to have your 5 year old RV be worth less than someone elses 10-15 year old rv that's been covered and lightly used, 5 years from now.
5. Build some credit. Doing the apartment thing, you could buy a (used) truck now, on credit, and then buy a trailer in a little while. I think TTs and 5vers generally depreciate more than motor homes, so better value (if you have/need the truck anyway). And if you get a big HD truck, you might find a cheaper older TC that you could spring for with cash if you jsut gotta get out of the apartment. If you have $0 for downpayments etc going into this, it's not going to be pretty regardless of which path you choose.


Or to sum it up, best value is get a big pickup and then you can get any type of trailer you want. Get a cheap throwaway for the short term, build credit with a truck loan, still have a large living area and not spend much on the fist RV. $10k for a trailer will get you a very nice trailer and you'll have the configuration (a full truck hood) that you started the thread with.


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Tiger4x4RV

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Posted: 04/07/21 05:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

et cetera wrote:

are there any class C with a truck front, not a van front?


Tiger is built on a stock chassis. I get mine serviced at the local Chevy truck dealer. The mechanics say it is the coolest thing they've ever seen on a Chevy chassis.


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kwplot34

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Posted: 04/08/21 01:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The Thor omni/magnitude motor homes are Super C's and are on the Ford F 550 chassis, not a gas engine but have the 6.7L diesel and have 4X4. I have the XG32 and really like it.

et cetera

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Posted: 04/08/21 08:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

A few things to consider. And yes I read you other thread too.

Or to sum it up, best value is get a big pickup and then you can get any type of trailer you want. Get a cheap throwaway for the short term, build credit with a truck loan, still have a large living area and not spend much on the fist RV. $10k for a trailer will get you a very nice trailer and you'll have the configuration (a full truck hood) that you started the thread with.


Interesting points you make. I have struggled with this option for years. A heavy duty TV (such as F250 HD or whatever) plus a TT or a RV with a toad.

It is an interesting idea, to just get a heavy duty 3/4 ton and a throw-away camper would be great at this point and later on get what I really want, either a Fifth or something else. And there is nothing wrong at all with a classy Airstream, one can certainly do a lot worse than that. Late 90's one that's wide body should be in my price range.
It's nice to have that kind of flexibility. An RV both gives and reduces options. That is, you are married to the drivetrain it comes with. Not sure I am thrilled with that concept.

Once I park the rig for 6 months, I have the flexibility of using TV as a DD. My commute is not huge so it's cheaper to use a single vehicle versus getting a cheaper econobox with great MPG. I already ran these numbers.

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 04/08/21 10:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

et cetera wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

A few things to consider. And yes I read you other thread too.

Or to sum it up, best value is get a big pickup and then you can get any type of trailer you want. Get a cheap throwaway for the short term, build credit with a truck loan, still have a large living area and not spend much on the fist RV. $10k for a trailer will get you a very nice trailer and you'll have the configuration (a full truck hood) that you started the thread with.


Interesting points you make. I have struggled with this option for years. A heavy duty TV (such as F250 HD or whatever) plus a TT or a RV with a toad.

It is an interesting idea, to just get a heavy duty 3/4 ton and a throw-away camper would be great at this point and later on get what I really want, either a Fifth or something else. And there is nothing wrong at all with a classy Airstream, one can certainly do a lot worse than that. Late 90's one that's wide body should be in my price range.
It's nice to have that kind of flexibility. An RV both gives and reduces options. That is, you are married to the drivetrain it comes with. Not sure I am thrilled with that concept.

Once I park the rig for 6 months, I have the flexibility of using TV as a DD. My commute is not huge so it's cheaper to use a single vehicle versus getting a cheaper econobox with great MPG. I already ran these numbers.


If you have a TV then put it to work. My 2500 sat for awhile while I drove my Class c. Sold the C and got a toy hauler,Forest River work and play with enough room for a side by side. It's built like a tank and weighs as much as one. I drop the trailer then go off fishing etc.
With my c I towed my Jeep instead. Times and needs change, adjust accordingly.

Grit dog

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Posted: 04/08/21 01:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

et cetera wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

A few things to consider. And yes I read you other thread too.

Or to sum it up, best value is get a big pickup and then you can get any type of trailer you want. Get a cheap throwaway for the short term, build credit with a truck loan, still have a large living area and not spend much on the fist RV. $10k for a trailer will get you a very nice trailer and you'll have the configuration (a full truck hood) that you started the thread with.


Interesting points you make. I have struggled with this option for years. A heavy duty TV (such as F250 HD or whatever) plus a TT or a RV with a toad.

It is an interesting idea, to just get a heavy duty 3/4 ton and a throw-away camper would be great at this point and later on get what I really want, either a Fifth or something else. And there is nothing wrong at all with a classy Airstream, one can certainly do a lot worse than that. Late 90's one that's wide body should be in my price range.
It's nice to have that kind of flexibility. An RV both gives and reduces options. That is, you are married to the drivetrain it comes with. Not sure I am thrilled with that concept.

Once I park the rig for 6 months, I have the flexibility of using TV as a DD. My commute is not huge so it's cheaper to use a single vehicle versus getting a cheaper econobox with great MPG. I already ran these numbers.


Not unlike most decisions, different options have different advantages and drawbacks.

ron.dittmer

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Posted: 04/09/21 08:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

et cetera,

I did not read through all the posts, but I wanted to provide my opinion and experience.

Our first motor home HERE was built on a Toyota pickup truck chassis that we owned for 24 years. One of the things I appreciated was easy access to the engine. But as time passed, my priorities transitioned from "easy mechanical maintenance" to "we want maximum house". When we replaced that tiny little rig, we went with a 2007 Ford E350 based rig HERE that provided the most house for the shortest van front. The following year, Ford restyled the E-series which added 3 inches forward, a critical 3" that would not allow me to walk around the rig when parked in our garage.

I dismissed a class-A primarily because the rig had to fit in our garage, but I have other issues with them.

Where I volunteer as a mechanic at an auto charity, I worked on a few old class A's and they are a serious pain to work on. I will take a mass-produced class C van chassis over any "kit" class A any day. Not only are they not designed with consideration to maintenance & repair, but they are built with inferior metals that rust badly. Disassembling anything often results in fabricating body panel brackets because the originals were rusted away so badly. Replacing a radiator is nearly impossible. Current-day class-A's, in some cases you have to remove the entire face of the motor home (windshield and all) to replace the radiator.

So if you are looking for "ease of maintenance" a class-A should "NOT" be a consideration.

As intimidating as a van chassis appears, they really are not bad. Interference items are fairly easily removed for access to the work area. Auto manufactures design automobiles with that consideration. Now I will admit, there have been a few bad apples, but the standard Ford and Chevy vans are not one of them.

So when considering a pickup truck front versus a van front, do you want 3 feet more hood, or 3 feet more house. After a while, you will likely opt for more of what you bought the rig for, enjoying it's comforts. Your wife will appreciate it all the more. If you wonder, 3 feet of extra house is "A Lot" of extra comfort.

There is also one additional consideration pickup or van. The van is easy to enter and exit from inside the house. It's harder in a pickup truck.

The van design has monumental advantages that apply directly to general comfort. More house and easy entry & exit from within. For 98% of people, that supersedes easier repairs.

* This post was last edited 04/10/21 07:11am by ron.dittmer *   View edit history


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Chum lee

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Posted: 04/10/21 07:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

et cetera wrote:

I am DIY person and looking for a class C that's easy to fix, by that I mean it has a truck-like, easily accessible engine bay. Think F250 engine bay and you got it. I had an older F250HD and everything was accessible, spark plugs were no issue at all. One could do water pump, belts, mostly anything. Now I never got inside the motor nor did any tranny work. I mean situations where the radiator hose bursts in the middle of nowhere, or a belt.

I get concerned about these van-type designs where repairs become considerably more difficult. As half the engine is not accessible.


Whenever you talk DIY on a truck chassis, IMO, it's ALWAYS about having the right tools for the job because of the size/weight/time. (IMO, everything is easier when you do) Look at any professional commercial truck repair facility. The Pro's ALWAYS have pneumatic/hydraulic/electric repair tools including lifts, pits, hoists, compressors, jacks, presses, pullers, pumps, special wrenches, machine tools, mills, drill presses, lathes, power washers, solvent tanks, welders, appropriate tempered/sheltered space, etc., the list goes on and on. As a DIY'er, (Now, I'm one too) on the road, most often, you don't have the benefits of all those tools. That doesn't mean you can't "Git 'er done" . . . . just that it will be more difficult with the limited array tools you "DO" have. IMO, with patience, persistence, creativity, help from a few friendly hands, factory service manuals, a little cash, experience, internet, . . . . you can do just about anything cheaply, . . . just not as fast as the pro's. So, . . . . if you're in a hurry, . . . IGNORE THIS POST.

Chum lee

* This post was last edited 04/16/21 07:50pm by Chum lee *   View edit history

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