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 > Turbo goes out at 37,000 miles

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HHg in Austin

Austin, Texas

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Posted: 04/27/21 02:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Maybe someone can impart a little wisdom.....I have a Tiffin Phaeton (only 37,000 miles) with the 8.3 ISB, with 380 HP and 1250 foot pounds of torque. I maintain this thing as it should be, even have it stored in an enclosed facility. Driving down the road several weeks ago, the check engine light comes on, then the stop engine warning...I’m on a very small one lane road....before I can find a place to get out of the road, it goes into limp mode (derate the engine) and just a very short distance later.....shuts down. Coast onto the side of the road and that’s it.....tow to a very large Freightliner dealer where I get the bad news. I bought this baby brand new and maintain it like crazy. Any guesses as to what could have caused this??


HHg in Austin
2013 Tiffin Phaeton 40-QBH
2018 Chevrolet Tahoe Toad


bgum

South Louisiana

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Posted: 04/27/21 03:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Heat? Dirt? Some last some don't.

Seattle Steve

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Posted: 04/27/21 03:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Heat is the biggest killer. Even though your unit only has 37,000 miles, it is 8-9 years old. That's the magic point where things will mysteriously start failing. That's why you've (hopefully) been putting a couple thousand dollars a year into your repair savings account.

LouLawrence

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Posted: 04/27/21 04:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bad turbo?

HHg in Austin

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Posted: 04/27/21 04:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LouLawrence wrote:

Bad turbo?


Indeed....replaced the Turbo, turbo actuator, NoX sensor and did all the yearly maintenance, service, coolant flush and change, etc...|

mike brez

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Posted: 04/27/21 05:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Easy fix I did mine last year.
This place is awesome to get turbo.

[image]


1998 36 foot Country Coach Magna #5499 Single slide
Gillig chassis with a series 40
02 Ford F250 7.3 with a few mods
2015 Wrangler JKU

navegator

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Posted: 04/27/21 06:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One item that kills a turbo really fast is driving down the interstate at full speed and getting off to get fuel, coming in to the gas station and shutting down the engine.
This simple little action is detrimental to the life of the turbo, while the engine is running the oil is circulating to the turbo and lubricating the bearings and cooling, shutting the engine down shuts the flow of oil, this oil not only helps lubricate the bearings it also helps with cooling the unit.
When the flow of oil is interrupted the residual oil begins to cook and slowly starts to block the passages and also starts to destroy the bearings.
Depending on the turbo, it will spin at about 17,000 RPM at idle and anywhere up to 150,000 RPM's running down the road.
Try to avoid this by letting the engine idle 2 to 3 minutes or more before shutting down, this helps the turbo slow down to near idle speeds and helps cool the unit a bit, this prolongs the life of the turbo.
I do not know if they still manufacture them or not, it is an electric motor 12vdc and a pump coupled with a timer that runs for about 3 minutes at engine shut down and pumps oil to the turbo after the engine is shut down, totally separate from the engine, runs from the engine sump to the oil line for the turbo, the oil then drains to the engine pan this helps cool down the hot end of the turbo while it spools down and prolongs it's life.

navegator

HHg in Austin

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Posted: 04/27/21 06:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

navegator wrote:

One item that kills a turbo really fast is driving down the interstate at full speed and getting off to get fuel, coming in to the gas station and shutting down the engine.
This simple little action is detrimental to the life of the turbo, while the engine is running the oil is circulating to the turbo and lubricating the bearings and cooling, shutting the engine down shuts the flow of oil, this oil not only helps lubricate the bearings it also helps with cooling the unit.
When the flow of oil is interrupted the residual oil begins to cook and slowly starts to block the passages and also starts to destroy the bearings.
Depending on the turbo, it will spin at about 17,000 RPM at idle and anywhere up to 150,000 RPM's running down the road.
Try to avoid this by letting the engine idle 2 to 3 minutes or more before shutting down, this helps the turbo slow down to near idle speeds and helps cool the unit a bit, this prolongs the life of the turbo.
I do not know if they still manufacture them or not, it is an electric motor 12vdc and a pump coupled with a timer that runs for about 3 minutes at engine shut down and pumps oil to the turbo after the engine is shut down, totally separate from the engine, runs from the engine sump to the oil line for the turbo, the oil then drains to the engine pan this helps cool down the hot end of the turbo while it spools down and prolongs it's life.

navegator



I have made me a small white laminated sign and Velcro’d it the dash.......it says: 5 Min

Cummins recommends a 3-5 minute cool down before shutting off the engine. I have been guilty of this in the past....never again.

Bruce Brown

Northern NY

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Posted: 04/27/21 06:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

navegator wrote:

One item that kills a turbo really fast is driving down the interstate at full speed and getting off to get fuel, coming in to the gas station and shutting down the engine.
This simple little action is detrimental to the life of the turbo, while the engine is running the oil is circulating to the turbo and lubricating the bearings and cooling, shutting the engine down shuts the flow of oil, this oil not only helps lubricate the bearings it also helps with cooling the unit.
When the flow of oil is interrupted the residual oil begins to cook and slowly starts to block the passages and also starts to destroy the bearings.
Depending on the turbo, it will spin at about 17,000 RPM at idle and anywhere up to 150,000 RPM's running down the road.
Try to avoid this by letting the engine idle 2 to 3 minutes or more before shutting down, this helps the turbo slow down to near idle speeds and helps cool the unit a bit, this prolongs the life of the turbo.
I do not know if they still manufacture them or not, it is an electric motor 12vdc and a pump coupled with a timer that runs for about 3 minutes at engine shut down and pumps oil to the turbo after the engine is shut down, totally separate from the engine, runs from the engine sump to the oil line for the turbo, the oil then drains to the engine pan this helps cool down the hot end of the turbo while it spools down and prolongs it's life.

navegator


This - 100%, every time.


There are 24 hours in every day - it all depends on how you choose to use them.
Bruce & Jill Brown
2008 Kountry Star Pusher 3910


Jarlaxle

New England

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Posted: 04/27/21 07:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sometimes they just...fail. These are very complex variable-geometry turbochargers and much more prone to fail than older turbos. (We actually lost one at work on a Cummins 8.9 about a month and a half ago.)

https://www.drivingline.com/articles/why........turbo-s-fail-and-how-you-can-prevent-it/


John and Elizabeth (Liz), with Briza the size XL tabby
St. Bernard Marm, cats Vierna and Maya...RIP. ">
Current rig:
1992 International Genesis school bus conversion

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