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Open Roads Forum  >  Around the Campfire

 > One Great Big EV Thread

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Reisender

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Posted: 05/05/21 03:49pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RambleOnNW wrote:

Reisender wrote:

RambleOnNW wrote:

Reisender wrote:

RambleOnNW wrote:

Reisender wrote:

I have no problem with hydrogen. I can see getting the price down so it’s competitive with electricity might be a challenge though. That and there is a whole bunch of people getting used to the convenience of fueling at home. Not sure if that is doable with hydrogen. I can see some advantages for over the road trucking though. Not to mention vehicles like our F350 dually diesels etc.


Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry.


Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose.


May get an electric someday but will probably wait for hydrogen. It better fits one of our use cases which is making a 500 mile drive to stay at a ski area, sometimes into a winter storm warning. We do a couple of 5 minute fuel ups along the way. That scenario is not going to happen with batteries.


Fair enough. But not everybody is as constrained for time. The extra 20 -30 minutes in an EV for that trip might be worth it to some as an EV has a lot of advantages. I think in your case a bigger challenge would be is if the infrastructure is in place on the route you need to go. We are very fortunate in that infrastructure is pretty good on the routes we travel, but at least for the near future that may not be the case for some or even many people depending on where they are and where they are going. That will take time.

Jmho.


You must take into account that electric cars lose significant range in cold temperatures particularly the temperatures I am talking. Running the electric heat pump takes energy also. Hydrogen fuel cells generate heat as a part of the hydrogen and oxygen combining. Also right now there is hydrogen at the Amazon and Walmart warehouses fueling hydrogen forklifts every 3 seconds across the country. Hydrogen forklifts moved 1/3 of US groceries in the US in the last year and don’t have any performance degradation in cold warehouses.


Yah I’m not up on hydrogen much. But we live in Canada and honestly a 500 mile trip in the winter probably wouldn’t take any longer in our EV than it would in our old grand Cherokee. But that is mostly because we travel different than you. You take two 5 minute fuel breaks on your 500 mile trip. We would stop at least 20 minutes for lunch and probably once or twice for a coffee and pee break for 10 or 15 minutes. We just charge while we are stopped. We do trips like that now. But again we have two things going for us, good infrastructure and the extra 20 or 30 minutes for charging that we would be taking as a break anyway. Different people, different needs and styles of travelling and of course it depends where you travel.

Cheers.

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Posted: 05/05/21 03:56pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Moderator wrote:

Folks, let's stop with the quotes within quotes within quotes within quotes within quotes please. Just quote the member to which you are responding to, and if it is the post directly above you, you do not need to quote at all. Thanks.


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Posted: 05/05/21 07:33pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator


There is a HUGE difference between "does not need to come from strip mines," and "does not come from strip mines." Much, and I mean MUCH lithium today comes from strip mines.


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Bobbo

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Posted: 05/05/21 07:37pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

RambleOnNW wrote:

Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry.


Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose.

Nice for you, but we need to consider the Florida coasts and Texas gulf coast too. Power outages from hurricanes can last weeks. Think about the traffic jams you see on the news when populations are evacuating. Everybody needing an hour to charge their car every 250 miles?

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Posted: 05/05/21 07:37pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

https://autos.yahoo.com/im-not-driving-electric-car-150000552.html

miltvill

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Posted: 05/05/21 07:43pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

Gjac wrote:

Typically how many amp hrs does an EV battery store? Is it practical to charge these batteries via solar? If so how big of a solar system would be required.


Typically EV car batteries range from 40 KWH to 100 KWH depending on manufacturer or model. Current EV SUV's that people use to tow RV's like small tear drop trailers, pop up trailers or boats have batteries that range from 80 KWH to 100 KWH. The EV trucks that will be coming out this year all seem to be between 140 and 200 KWH but manufacturers have been reluctant to release exact specs.

Re solar. Sure...sort of. A typical 30 to 50 kilometer commute in a car uses about 6 to 8 kwh of power. So in that case solar is quite effective for charging even with a small dedicated garage system. Minimal storage is needed if you can charge during the day...but it gets trickier for those charging at night unless you are grid connected etc.

Below is a picture of off grid solar EV chargers that, depending on weather, can charge 2 or 3 cars per day for a typical commute. It has built in storage as well. They are built in San Diego. It interesting that Rivian who will be producing the Rivian 1/2 ton later this year is going to be deploying these to popular trail heads and off grid camping areas. Their target market is the small trailer, tenter, camper, hiker fisher, kayaker crowd. Neat idea. No permitting or infrastructure needed. 10 minute set up.

Cheers

[image]

[image]

[image]



Do they make a 50amp or 30amp RV adaptor for that charging station. Looks like a good free camping spot with electricity.


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Posted: 05/05/21 07:57pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lol. [emoticon]. I saw a 120 service outlet that might work.

RambleOnNW

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Posted: 05/05/21 08:17pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Don’t know how practical those solar chargers are. With 12 400-watt panels each they might be able to produce 75 kWh per day at the latitude of San Diego per charger.


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Posted: 05/05/21 08:23pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bobbo wrote:

Reisender wrote:

RambleOnNW wrote:

Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry.


Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose.

Nice for you, but we need to consider the Florida coasts and Texas gulf coast too. Power outages from hurricanes can last weeks. Think about the traffic jams you see on the news when populations are evacuating. Everybody needing an hour to charge their car every 250 miles?


Yah I get that. Lots of extreme weather there. But EV’s are evolving pretty quick. The latest models charge 200 miles in 15 minutes. That will probably be mainstream in a few years. Things will look different in 5 years than they are today. And five years after that things will change again.

It may be different there but here BC Canada if there is a power outage the gas stations are all closed as well. I can see governments having to rethink infrastructure needs as alternative fueled vehicles gain popularity. We are noticing some of that here with BC Hydro adding some DCFC stations on some pretty remote highways presumably for winter storm situations. We have just been passing them by but I can see how they would be handy in unexpected harsh winter conditions.

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Posted: 05/05/21 08:27pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RambleOnNW wrote:

Don’t know how practical those solar chargers are. With 12 400-watt panels each they might be able to produce 75 kWh per day at the latitude of San Diego per charger.


Yes, but their target market is office commuters etc doing a typical commute. A typical commute is about 8 KWH In North America. That’s about 50 kilometres. I can see that. Ours is about 6 KWH most days.

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