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monkey44

Cape Cod, MA and Central Fla

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Posted: 06/09/21 05:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We never needed that kind of coordination in early pre-cell phone days. With cell phones come the crowds, or maybe the ability to plan with web information and the emerging of more technology helps.

Once the RV stampede across all of USA as the RV matured into a condo on wheels, then it almost necessitates the complexity of organizing your trips. If we had no smart phones, we probably could not organize well enough, and therefore, less crowds and less need for smart phones. Chicken before the egg, or which is it??


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Reader1

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Posted: 06/09/21 08:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We both use tech a lot, but I half the time do not know where my phone is. I think it do it intentionally...I am not married to a phone. I know this winter when DH was in the hospital, I could send updates so easily so I do appreciate it. I hope families with children still to fun things together, play board games, ride bikes, camp, and shut down the tech each day for those times. The importance of family time for children can never be overstated.

Reader1

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Posted: 06/09/21 08:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Veebyes wrote:

I don't know how people enjoyed the RVing lifestyle before cellphones. How did you do the research required for multi month trips involving thousands of miles with all of the complications of weather delays & mechanical issues thrown into the mix?

Today is easy. The basic route is plotted out. CGs are found on the fly, usually making a same day reservation a few hours from the dtination.


We relied on AAA. One trip we were gone for a month but did the same no matter how long our trip was. We planned it all out, utilized the library and then went to AAA. We gave them our itinerary and they gave us our "trip tix" that mapped out every road we would be on. We had travel books and camp books from AAA and made reservations from those. We thought it was simple

atreis

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Posted: 06/12/21 07:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reader1 wrote:

I hope families with children still to fun things together, play board games, ride bikes, camp, and shut down the tech each day for those times. The importance of family time for children can never be overstated.


Many parents, including us, do exactly that. I can't say we do it EVERY day, but 2-3 days a week.


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darkmind25

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

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Posted: 06/15/21 09:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I remember owning pagers and a Motorola MicroTAC cellphone.

mr. ed

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Posted: 06/17/21 08:01am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ferndaleflyer wrote:

I recently found some post cards I had sent to parents 65 years ago. I was 15 and took off hitch hiking around the country. You could do that in the 1950s. Parents didn't have a phone so once in a while I sent a post card. Here I sit with an I-12 and wonder if anyone sends post cards anymore


I had 2 postcards (now lost) from around 1906. Both were made of soft leather and stamped (never saw a postcard made of anything but paper), and there was still barely legible writing on them. I vaguely remember they were sent from the east coast (possibly Brooklyn). I wish I still had them today as interesting curios.


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jkwilson

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Posted: 06/17/21 02:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

darkmind25 wrote:

I remember owning pagers and a Motorola MicroTAC cellphone.


I had a StarTAC that I hated. Job required I carry it and have it on at all times, but absolutely prohibited from using it for anything personal. I setup my desk phone at work to forward to my wife’s phone and I’d call her from the West Coast early so the minutes didn’t count and no one was the wiser. My boss wanted me to call in to a 3 hour meeting once. I told him I was in a roaming area and he wanted me to call in anyway I can’t remember whether that call itself cost $1600 or that was the total bill, but he had some splainin’ to do.


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BackOfThePack

Fort Worth

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Posted: 05/17/22 02:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Veebyes wrote:

I don't know how people enjoyed the RVing lifestyle before cellphones. How did you do the research required for multi month trips involving thousands of miles with all of the complications of weather delays & mechanical issues thrown into the mix?

Today is easy. The basic route is plotted out. CGs are found on the fly, usually making a same day reservation a few hours from the destination.


1). AAA Triptik (Mobil Oil)
— Atlas
— Compass
— Binoculars
— Handheld spotlight
— State road maps
— US Park Svc Directory
— COE Directory

2). Yellow Pages (any phone booth)
— Oil company maps with their locations
— Best Western or other motel chain directories
— KOA Directory
— State travel guides

I today use an Army Messenger Shoulder Bag to carry this stuff (reproduction). My mother would fill the passenger footwell of one of those Chryslers or Cadillacs with her reference library of tote style bags. My grandmother used the backseat footwell. (We traveled weeks, they traveled months. Mexico, Canada and the US).

Learning to travel by car 3-6/weeks at a time is science, and then the art of how you want to do it. It’s point to point. Not day to day. Clock matters a little, calendar not at all.

The research was the rest of the year (assuming one big yearly trip). Magazine subscriptions. Newspaper articles. Friends and family.

I don’t think anyones going to visit both coasts in one trip. So, arrive at an area and from one or two campgrounds day-tour the region by car. Make a few notes on where to stay on a future trip. (Can’t see or fish all of Colorado on one trip, etc)

I’d say map reading was hardest (easiest to make mistakes which were stressful). Turn-by-turn even if experienced (notes made) you couldn’t do it without paying attention to compass headings. That’s planning from the night before: “x-miles W on US63 past Clarendon; T-L 1/2M past courthouse onto OK 667 for 6-miles . . . “ (you had to deduce actual miles despite distance aids as printed). An outline format, easily read at speed.

Some folks not naturally good at directions. Inner compass plus time/distance sense. My grandmother would direct you in her kitchen by referring you to the SW cabinet on the NE wall.

— You needed — as a man — two wristwatches in the event one failed. Your World War infantry or sailors navigation training was finally applicable (was a joke I heard often as a child, men comparing routes on leaving a campground or National Park. “Hold steady at 270-degrees for 18”, and then take the . . . “, how the joke unfolded.)

Phones at camp office, sure. But by mid -1970s you plugged in a land-line at the service pedestal. (My 1990 has this exterior plug). Local almost free if not quite crooks, but you’d pay over and above standard fee for long-distance.). Bought me a Western Electric desk model against that day.

Letter-writing, not just post cards, was an expectation. Mail forwarded to General Delivery was another.

Gasoline credit cards were new enough. But having ones for oil companies not in your home region was another. So, Diners Club, AMEX and some others (not easily approved). The thing was TRAVELERS CHEQUES. Who would cash them? How much? What fee? (Having a floor safe in a premium RV was a regular option check).

The REAL question was that you should ask, is, How did they do it without television? (It was a good long ways into the 1980s that nightly assumption was operable. Sometimes in aerial, sometimes on cable. Sometimes not at all. In the 1960s didn’t expect to have any service (why camp in or near a city; got that when back home).

Reading was its own pleasure. Strongly encouraged as the adults expected to feel rested once parked somewhere for more than a day. I recall the hours after lunch as being enforced quiet (nap, draw circles in sand, chase chipmunks, read).

Campgrounds often had a morning coffee hour, and maybe a camp fire a little ways into dark in the evenings. Local paper for sale at camp office.

Clear channel AM radio at night. FM near big cities days after 1970. Rural AM was owned locally. Could be quite informative.

Having a “campground CB” in the RV was another “thing” by the mid 1970s. Folks would ask the Q’s you’d expect — laundry, brake job, hair salon, catfish restaurant. (And tires. Always tires back then. Fuel pumps next).

(Put a 70’s CB in my current rig. Gets out a few hundred yards with an on-glass antenna I can unscrew and store. Bigger and fancier ones elsewhere).

* This post was last edited 05/17/22 03:44pm by BackOfThePack *   View edit history


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ferndaleflyer

everywhere

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Posted: 05/17/22 05:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Really, in 1957 I went coast to coast and back. Try that with no phone or map or Interstates! Yes I am OLD.

Veebyes

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Posted: 05/18/22 03:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The last three nights we were at a VT CG where there is no cellphone signal, Verizon or T Mobile, no WIFI, not in the CG, no OTA TV reception.

We survived. The CG was darned near empty. Suspect that being a communications wasteland has something to do with it.


It is amazing at how many are truly addicted to their cellphones. Look at how many will not travel remote areas, such as going to Alaska without their beloved cellphones & some means of guaranteed connection.

So sad.


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