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Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > GFI Breaker

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BB_TX

McKinney, Texas

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Posted: 07/01/21 01:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dusty R wrote:

GFI = Ground Fault Interrupter Is what they were called when they first came out/were required.
GFCI = Ground Fault Current is what they are now called, there maybe a slight difference.
A GFCI receptacle is most often the first receptacle on a circuit then all the other receptacle down the line are also GFCI protected, if properly wired.

Actually GFCI means ground fault circuit interrupter. They do not trip on over current. They trip if there is a ground fault (basically an abnormal leak of current to ground) in that circuit, as little as 5 ma.

Dusty R

Charlotte Michigan 48813

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Posted: 07/01/21 02:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BB_TX wrote:

Dusty R wrote:

GFI = Ground Fault Interrupter Is what they were called when they first came out/were required.
GFCI = Ground Fault Current is what they are now called, there maybe a slight difference.
A GFCI receptacle is most often the first receptacle on a circuit then all the other receptacle down the line are also GFCI protected, if properly wired.

Actually GFCI means ground fault circuit interrupter. They do not trip on over current. They trip if there is a ground fault (basically an abnormal leak of current to ground) in that circuit, as little as 5 ma.


Thanks for correcting my mistake, and adding how they work. That 5 ma. is so small that it can travel through you trip the power and you will not feel it.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 07/01/21 02:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BB_TX wrote:

Dusty R wrote:

GFI = Ground Fault Interrupter Is what they were called when they first came out/were required.
GFCI = Ground Fault Current is what they are now called, there maybe a slight difference.
A GFCI receptacle is most often the first receptacle on a circuit then all the other receptacle down the line are also GFCI protected, if properly wired.

Actually GFCI means ground fault circuit interrupter. They do not trip on over current. They trip if there is a ground fault (basically an abnormal leak of current to ground) in that circuit, as little as 5 ma.


There are however combination breaker and GFCI that goes inside ones breaker panel..

[image]

Those breakers are insanely pricey at $75 each and you can tell it is not a standard breaker as it has a White Neutral pigtail wire that must be connected to the Neutral Buss bar..

As far as I am aware, GFCI breakers are not available in Duplex or Twin format..

As far as separate GFCIs wiring goes, not all outlets on that circuit may be wired through a GFCI. GFCI can be inserted anywhere in the circuit depending on what outlets need to be protected..

So, you can find some outlets that may be upstream (before the GFCI) and not GFCI protected if they are not in a wet location and any outlets downstream (after GFCI)of the GFCI will be GFCI protected as long as they were connected to the load side of the GFCI..

enblethen

Moses Lake, WA

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Posted: 07/01/21 02:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer:
The OP says he bought a single pole breaker not a two pole tandem.


Bud
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wopachop

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Posted: 07/01/21 02:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DarkSkySeeker wrote:

About an hour later, mysteriously, they were on.

Here's the real guesswork...

The contacts on the old breaker looked bent. While on there was continuity but I could not tell if power was getting to it through the bent contacts.
The mysteriously turning on an hour later sounds like a loose wire connection. I would kill power to the entire trailer, and then tighten every single wire in your panel.

You just installed a new breaker. But you were not able to test the old breaker, or the new breaker? Be careful but just flip the breaker on and probe the screw and the neutral bus bar. If you see 120v, the breaker is working.

While i think its a loose wire you could check where your fridge plugs in. That might be an outlet that you have not checked for a gfci yet. But.....its almost silly to consider the GFCI to be the issue since power resumed on its own.

I would first find the neutral that is used for the new breaker you installed.

wopachop

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Posted: 07/01/21 02:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If your breaker has 120v and the neutral is tight then you try to guess which outlet would be first down the line. Start yanking off covers and look for loose wires. Signs of hot wires burning plastic.

The little device you plug into an outlet is cheap and quick to determine if you have a loose neutral or ground. Or if the previous tech wired stuff wrong.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 07/01/21 05:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

enblethen wrote:

Gdetrailer:
The OP says he bought a single pole breaker not a two pole tandem.


No where did I mention or post "two pole tandem" which would have both breaker handles tied together and would be for 240V usage like this pix..

[image]

and in reality a double pole breaker is not referred to a "tandem" because the handles are tied together and the breaker is twice the size of a standard 1" breaker to catch both L1 and L2

OP posted this pix..

DarkSkySeeker wrote:

All of the breakers are the same manufacturer, they just have different limits.

[image]


All of the breakers in that pix are single pole tandem and I suspect the OP had to buy a single pole tandem in order to replace the old breaker.

Most breaker panels in RVs will be full and to maximize the amount of circuits they will use single pole tandems in the pix the OP provided and the examples I have shown other than the double pole 240V breaker in this post..

enblethen

Moses Lake, WA

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Posted: 07/01/21 06:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer: you posted a two two pole tandem breaker in your first post with what some call a twin breaker. These have one connection to the buss work yo provide 2 120 volt circuits. two pole tandem breaker
Your second post with photo is a two pole standard breaker. This connects to two different busses and provides 240 volts.

* This post was edited 07/01/21 06:25pm by enblethen *

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 07/01/21 06:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

enblethen wrote:

Gdetrailer: you posted a two two pole tandem breaker in your first post with what some call a twin breaker. These have one connection to the buss work yo provide 2 120 volt circuits. two pole tandem breaker
Your second post with photo is a two pole standard breaker. This connects to two different busses and provides 240 volts.


You ARE wrong.

HERE is my first post, it is not edited and does not say what you are telling me that I said.

Gdetrailer wrote:

enblethen wrote:

Double check the galley area for another GFCI receptacle
If you paid $25 for a single pole breaker, you got ripped off! There is nothing special about RV breakers!


Those are Eaton BD1515 Duplex or "twin" breakers, and are two breakers built into one full size housing.

[image]

Allows one to add more circuits to the breaker box than single full size breakers would have allowed. Works in boxes not designed for half size breakers.

They are more expensive than if you used a single full size breaker and $25 is not out of line..

Same one is selling for $22.63 at Amazon HERE, add in taxes and possibly shipping it would be right around $25..

Nothing special about that breaker, it is not a GFCI breaker and somewhere down the wiring line there is most likely a GFCI since the panel label mentions it..


Perhaps you can highlight exactly where in that post that I said what you say I said..

That pix in my first post IS a BD1515 single pole (120V) "Twin" or "tandem" breaker.

If you also look closely to the pix the OP provided, on each breaker you will find BD1515 and those breakers DO cost about $25 each.

Obviously reading comprehension on your part is not up to par here and obviously you have not bought any BD1515 breakers in the last 10 yrs.. There was a time that those would cost about $11 and the singles about $5, but those days are long gone and will never come back.

enblethen

Moses Lake, WA

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Posted: 07/01/21 06:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was not able to open the OP's image on my old computer. I got it open just a minute or so ago, His photo is wafer, twin or tandem breakers. In his verbage, he said he bought a single pole breaker.
I am guessing verbage from OP is wrong and he did buy a wafer, twin or tandem breaker.
Yes, tandem breakers have gone up in price. I was talking price for standard single pole breaker.
Sorry if we were confusing one another.

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