RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Class C Motorhomes: learning about rving

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > learning about rving

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next
Sponsored By:
josianna

British Columbia

New Member

Joined: 07/14/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/14/21 03:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am hoping to do some ring in the near future and would like to have some suggestions. I am a senior single female and come with two pups. When younger up to four years ago tenting was my way to go and now that I have a cap things are a changing. Canada 's west is where home is and would love to explore and perhaps live in for a time while I search for a new home. The type of motorhome would probably be a class c. any and all help would be appreciated. Thanks

Lwiddis

Monterey, California

Senior Member

Joined: 08/12/2016

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/14/21 03:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Rent! It will help you decide on the floor plan, length etc. for a purchase. If you plan to pull a toad, watch the MH’s max tow weight.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, 300 watt solar-parallel & MPPT, Trojan T-125s. TALL flag pole. Prefer boondocking, USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, state camps. Bicyclist14 yr. Army vet-11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560) IOBC & IOAC grad


Lwiddis

Monterey, California

Senior Member

Joined: 08/12/2016

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/14/21 03:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Determine your CAP’s amp hour use. With adequate batteries and solar for recharging, it’s no problem.

rlw999

Washington State

Senior Member

Joined: 08/19/2020

View Profile



Posted: 07/14/21 04:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

josianna wrote:

When younger up to four years ago tenting was my way to go and now that I have a cap things are a changing.


What is a "cap"? I don't have any specific answers for you (there are lots of websites that do.. search for "beginning RV tips" and you'll find lots of videos and websites offering advice).

But I'm wondering what a "cap" is and why it made you stop tent camping, since that's something that people here may have specific advice for.

josianna

British Columbia

New Member

Joined: 07/14/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/14/21 05:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sorry I have sleep apnea and so use a cpap machine which needs electricity to run. Tenting was fun and so affordable but time does move on. Nowadays I am thinking that it would be safer to be in a vehicle especially at night with my age. Bathrooms are good.

DrewE

Vermont

Senior Member

Joined: 08/23/2014

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/14/21 06:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A few general suggestions:

1. Consider renting a motorhome for a few days or a week before purchasing one. You'll learn a fair bit about what it's like to use and drive one, and be better able to evaluate what features, floorplans, etc. would work for you, and be a leg up on understanding the systems of an RV.

2. I would generally not recommend buying new for your first RV. I'm not sure I'd buy new for any RV, personally, since the initial depreciation is pretty high and more often than there should be there are a bunch of--hopefully minor--initial defects to work through with the dealer/manufacturer. Let someone else take the financial hit and annoyance.

3. When it comes time to look at specific models to maybe buy, I suggest taking time to do a "dry run" of as many daily activities as you can--preferably physically, but at least in your mind. Go through the motions of dressing or undressing, cooking a meal, watching TV, reading a book, using the bathroom and shower, etc., and give thought to where things might be stored and whether you'll be forever bumping into a cabinet and so forth. Is there a good place for a trash can? a laundry bag or basket? Can you access the bathroom or fridge after pulling off the road without needing to deploy a slide? Is there room for your cutlery, your dishes, your coffee percolator, and your saucepans?





Bordercollie

Garden Grove, CA, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 03/07/2002

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/14/21 07:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Owning, maintaining and operating an RV requires some physical agility and effort/strength. You will need to "hunker down" and connect a drain hose to empty black gray water tanks and need to fill your fresh water tank. You will need to deploy and store your awning, fill your gas tank, and check your engine oil. If you intend to sleep in an overhead bed, it requires ladder climbing and some effort getting into and out of bed safely. There is a "house battery" and an RV generator that need maintenance. At 82, things that were once easy have become difficult for me but still doable. There are a number of technical and maintenance things that others can do for you, for a price. Buying a new or a used RV is tricky and you can make costly mistakes unless you equip yourself with knowledge or get help deciding what kind of RV you want, features, age if used, brand name, model name/size/floor plan, etc.,
Consider total cost of ownership and use: Initial price, financing charges, depreciation, insurance and emergency road service, DMV registration, maintenance services, fuel cost, RV camp space rental, incidentals, etc. Not meant to discourage you but to make you aware if you are not already aware. Consider a used Class B like a "Road Trek". Easier to drive, more expensive than Class C, usable as a get-around vehicle and camper. Good Luck!

jdc1

Rescue, Ca

Senior Member

Joined: 05/30/2011

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/14/21 08:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Like DrewE said......and, you might need a (toad) a car to be towed for commuting, unless you get something small enough to get around. Find a friend that has a Class C and see if you can stay in it a couple days. Cheaper than renting one.

theoldwizard1

SE MI

Senior Member

Joined: 09/07/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/15/21 06:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A certain amount of DIY ability is required. All RVs week to frequently have some type of problem, so a basic tool kit is required.

One of the maintenance items that gets overlooked is roof maintenance. At least once a year, the roof should be washed, caulking inspected/replaced and a UV protectant applied.

mockturtle

AZ

Senior Member

Joined: 05/31/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 07/15/21 08:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My close friend, also a senior female with two dogs, has a Class B Sprinter and it works very well for her. Where I like to camp I sometimes need the high clearance and 4-wheel drive so my Tiger is perfect (and I have only one small dog) but Sprinter Class Bs are easy to rent in Canada, as I have seen many on the road on my trips to Alaska so the suggestion to rent first is a good idea. Good luck and enjoy your travels. [emoticon]


2015 Tiger Bengal TX 4X4
Chevy 3500HD, 6L V8


Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > learning about rving
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.