RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Class A Motorhomes: Fuel for Gassers

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class A Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes  >  General Topics

 > Fuel for Gassers

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
theoldwizard1

SE MI

Senior Member

Joined: 09/07/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/24/21 03:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I always ran premium when towing through the Smokies. No knocking !

Hikerdogs

Wisconsin

Senior Member

Joined: 08/23/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/25/21 06:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you're looking to improve fuel mileage non ethanol regular (87 octane) is the way to go. As mentioned the ethanol does nothing in that regard except lower the mileage by the amount of ethanol in the fuel. With a 10% blend you can expect a 10% poorer mileage than with non ethanol unleaded.

It's a bit amusing that the non ethanol regular gasoline is most available in Iowa, the state that produces the most ethanol in the country. Non ethanol regular wasn't even available in neighboring Wisconsin until about 5 years ago. Even now it's not available at most stations. It's more easily found in rural areas and those catering to "recreational vehicles". In this case recreational vehicles refers to ATV's and marine inboard and outboard motors.


Hikerdogs
2013 Winnebago Adventurer

Ponderosa

Western US

Senior Member

Joined: 06/24/2003

View Profile



Posted: 07/25/21 06:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hikerdogs wrote:

If you're looking to improve fuel mileage non ethanol regular (87 octane) is the way to go. As mentioned the ethanol does nothing in that regard except lower the mileage by the amount of ethanol in the fuel. With a 10% blend you can expect a 10% poorer mileage than with non ethanol unleaded.

It's a bit amusing that the non ethanol regular gasoline is most available in Iowa, the state that produces the most ethanol in the country. Non ethanol regular wasn't even available in neighboring Wisconsin until about 5 years ago. Even now it's not available at most stations. It's more easily found in rural areas and those catering to "recreational vehicles". In this case recreational vehicles refers to ATV's and marine inboard and outboard motors.


A 10% reduction in mileage would imply that ethanol has no available energy on combustion. In fact, it is around 3 to 4% less than gasoline. So the mileage drop in reputable testing I have seen is also 3%-4% not 10%. That is also my experience when I have experimented. I would much prefer the real thing, but with pricing what it is, it is simply too expensive for payback at that number. I use it only in my stuff that frequently sits for months unused.


2011 Coachmen Freelander 27QB


vjstangelo

virginia

Senior Member

Joined: 08/05/2008

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/25/21 07:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When recently in CO I noted again that their "regular" is 85 octane. Since the manuals for my vehicles state don't use less than 87, I went with the mid grade 87 or premium 91 which pushed the price to over $4 gallon.


2012 Winnebago Vista 32K
2011 Honda CRV Toad

T18skyguy

Eugene, OR

Senior Member

Joined: 12/13/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 07/25/21 09:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RLS7201 wrote:

Why does premium fuel give more mileage and power?

Richard

Matt gave a very good answer and I'll add just a bit more. When engines are new, they usually don't ping even under high load and heat. But as they age,deposits build up on the top of the combustion chamber, valves, and pistons. These deposits raise the octane requirements because they take up space, and actually raise the compression ratio and the result is that the engine starts pinging on 87 octane. On cars, you usually see it start about 30-40 thousand miles. Engineers call it "Octane creep." So if you hear that rattling sound,you can move up to 89 octane to stop it if you'd like. Even though some manuals say light pinging is ok, myself I just want it stopped. I just give it what it wants. Higher octane doesn't really give you more power, it just stops the sensors from taking away power.


Retired Anesthetist. LTP. Pilot with mechanic/inspection ratings. Between rigs right now.. Wife and daughter. Four cats which we must obey.

JaxDad

Greater Toronto Area

Senior Member

Joined: 08/02/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/26/21 06:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ponderosa wrote:

Hikerdogs wrote:

If you're looking to improve fuel mileage non ethanol regular (87 octane) is the way to go. As mentioned the ethanol does nothing in that regard except lower the mileage by the amount of ethanol in the fuel. With a 10% blend you can expect a 10% poorer mileage than with non ethanol unleaded.

It's a bit amusing that the non ethanol regular gasoline is most available in Iowa, the state that produces the most ethanol in the country. Non ethanol regular wasn't even available in neighboring Wisconsin until about 5 years ago. Even now it's not available at most stations. It's more easily found in rural areas and those catering to "recreational vehicles". In this case recreational vehicles refers to ATV's and marine inboard and outboard motors.


A 10% reduction in mileage would imply that ethanol has no available energy on combustion. In fact, it is around 3 to 4% less than gasoline. So the mileage drop in reputable testing I have seen is also 3%-4% not 10%. That is also my experience when I have experimented. I would much prefer the real thing, but with pricing what it is, it is simply too expensive for payback at that number. I use it only in my stuff that frequently sits for months unused.


The problem with “reputable testing” is that it’s just that, testing, done in a laboratory.

In the real world, where we ‘test’ our mileage going down the highway, the differences are VERY different. There is water entrainment, fuel adulteration, messed timing based on false or misleading sensor input and generally much lower performance.

The only ‘real’ way to measure fuel economy is to do large scale real world test twice, once each on 2 different types of fuel. I have done that repeatedly and the results were FAR more than 3% to 4% different.

Rick Jay

Greater Springfield area, MA

Senior Member

Joined: 02/02/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/26/21 08:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ponderosa,

I'm right there with Hikerdogs and JaxDad. When we first purchased our motorhome, 10% ethanol was not common in New England. Within a few short years, it was mandated. Without a doubt, our gas mileage dropped 10% with the 10% ethanol fuel. I used to get consistent high 7's to low 8's. On ethanol, it hovers around 7.

One time, on a trip down south, unbeknownst to me, I stopped at a station and put REAL GAS into the rig. As we're driving down the highway, I checked the Scangauge MPG and the dash MPG...BOTH were reflecting around 8 MPG, plus or minus, when I had been seeing the typical low 7's the entire trip up to that point. At first, I thought I was just going down hill, but the GPS elevation proved that not to be the case.

Shortly after the next fill-up, the mileage pretty much was back to the low 7's. Once we arrived at our destination, I carefully reviewed the receipts and realized the state we had fueled in which gave the MPG boost DID NOT mandate ethanol fuels.

I know what the "science" says about the alcohol having an energy content. Of course it does. But for all of our vehicles, I've always experienced about a 10% drop in MPG when forced to run 10% ethanol gas.

Perhaps there are some vehicles that might only see a 3% or 4% drop in MPG on 10% ethanol. I have no idea. I just know that NONE of our vehicles are in that category, nor any vehicles owned by folks I've chatted with about this.

~Rick


2005 Georgie Boy Cruise Master 3625 DS on a Workhorse W-22
Rick, Gail, 1 girl (24-Angel since 2008), 1 girl (20), 2 boys (21 & 18).
2001 Honda Odyssey, Demco Aluminator tow bar & tow plate, SMI Silent Partner brake controller.


Hikerdogs

Wisconsin

Senior Member

Joined: 08/23/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/27/21 08:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've checked the mileage religiously on our 2001 Adventurer and our 2013 Adventurer. It's hard to put an exact number to the mileage difference due to the number of variables involved, but with both motorhomes we've consistently gotten 1 mph or more traveling the same routes when using the non ethanol regular. Given mileage is usually between 7 mpg and 8 mpg depending on the route traveled. An additional 1 mpg with non ethanol makes it cost effective to use it when available.

rgatijnet1

Florida

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2009

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 07/27/21 08:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On every gas pump that I have seen, the little sticker says "no more than 10% ethanol" meaning the fuel is mixed with the last batch, etc, and it may or may not have 10% ethanol. This is why your fuel mileage may vary from tank to tank. Some stations like WaWa and others have non-ethanol fuel as well as ethanol blend fuels. Some have the E85 which can be used in vehicles like my HHR toad. I always get the non-ethanol fuel for my small engines at home, including my emergency generator. In the motor home with the GM 8.1L engine, I used the E10 87 octane fuel and experienced no issues in 100,000+ miles of travel. I even used the 85 octane when in the Western mountains but always added 87 when I was going to lower altitudes. I never used any higher octane fuel than 87 and never felt the need. I didn't monitored my fuel mileage and didn't really care. Fuel costs were the price I paid to travel in an RV. To keep my in tank fuel pump cool, especially in hot weather, I always tried to refuel before the level got below 1/4. I guess it worked because I never had to change my fuel pump.

JaxDad

Greater Toronto Area

Senior Member

Joined: 08/02/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/27/21 06:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Rick Jay wrote:

Ponderosa,

I'm right there with Hikerdogs and JaxDad. When we first purchased our motorhome, 10% ethanol was not common in New England. Within a few short years, it was mandated. Without a doubt, our gas mileage dropped 10% with the 10% ethanol fuel.

I used to get consistent high 7's to low 8's. On ethanol, it hovers around 7. .

~Rick


Rick, not to nitpick, but ‘low 8’s’ down to 7 is a 15% drop, not 10%.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes  >  General Topics

 > Fuel for Gassers
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class A Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.