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JRscooby

Indepmo

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Posted: 08/08/21 05:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BTW, after years of using dealers and independent shops, I got to the point if I had AC problems, take it to Thermo King

RLS7201

Beautyful Downtown Gladstone, MO

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Posted: 08/08/21 08:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dodge guy wrote:

A good AC guy knows how to read gauges (and I am one of those people). You have to know outside temp and humidity and have a chart to compare that to the pressures on your gauges as well as the vent outlet temperature. It can be done with the right person. Sadly not many like that left anymore!


Another trick is to put you hand on the low side line just as it leaves the evaporator and feel the cold. As you add refrigerant you will feel the line getting colder. Then you will feel a cold rush of about a 10 degree drop. That's the point when the evaporator is boiling refrigerant through it's entirety. Add 4 more oz. to make sure you have a good liquid seal on the receiver/dryer down tube and you'll be nuts on.

Richard


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rgatijnet1

Florida

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Posted: 08/09/21 07:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I always just used a good temperature probe in the AC duct and added refrigerant very slowly and watched the temperature. As soon as it got to the lowest temperature and started to retreat, I stopped adding refrigerant. This worked well for me with my Classic cars with Freon 12 as well as with the R-134a. Then again, I'm no expert and was only interested in cold air from my AC unit.

Rick Jay

Greater Springfield area, MA

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Posted: 08/09/21 07:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rgatijnet1 wrote:

I always just used a good temperature probe in the AC duct and added refrigerant very slowly and watched the temperature. As soon as it got to the lowest temperature and started to retreat, I stopped adding refrigerant. This worked well for me with my Classic cars with Freon 12 as well as with the R-134a. Then again, I'm no expert and was only interested in cold air from my AC unit.


Agreed. Even though I had the gauges and (usually) have the graphs as well, the procedure I followed is what you state. Take your time and it works well.

Obviously, the few times when I filled the system after it's been evacuated I just fill it to the proper amount by putting the refrigerant tank on a proper scale while charging the system.

buystockinfun, as for the shut-off valves, I just put a standard hot-water shut-off valve from the hardware store on the input heater hose to the heater core.

JRscooby, you were right, the original mention of cutting off the hot water into the heater core mentioned using vise grips. I agree, probably not the best practice, especially with older hoses which might be more brittle and subject to being damaged. I was just referring to the idea of stopping the flow of hot coolant into the heater core. [emoticon]

~Rick

* This post was edited 08/09/21 11:21am by Rick Jay *


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Rick, Gail, 1 girl (25-Angel since 2008), 1 girl (20), 2 boys (21 & 18).
2001 Honda Odyssey, Demco Aluminator tow bar & tow plate, SMI Silent Partner brake controller.


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