RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Truck Campers: Why SRW off road?

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Why SRW off road?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Next
Sponsored By:
Rscconrad

Illinois

New Member

Joined: 02/21/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 08/08/21 06:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This may seem like an obvious question but it’s not to me. Why are srw preferred to drw when getting off the beaten path?

Just curious, it is obviously correct from what I have read but I can’t figure out exactly why.

Thanks in advance

Lwiddis

Near DVNP, California

Senior Member

Joined: 08/12/2016

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/08/21 07:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Less width.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, 300 watt solar-Lossigy 200 AMP Lithium battery. TALL flag pole. Prefer boondocking, USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, state camps. Bicyclist 14 yr. Army -11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560) IOBC & IOAC grad


bighatnohorse

Gig Harbor - Cave Creek

Senior Member

Joined: 01/15/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 08/08/21 07:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

Why are srw preferred to drw when getting off the beaten path?

Greater versatility.
For example, a forest service road worn to a cut in the road is wide enough for a dually. . .until a tight turn.

The dually rear wheels will ride up the road cut embankment and tilt the truck camper. . .sometimes to an extreme.
That event will rack the truck frame and stress the camper frame.

Off road, the dual tires can and will get boulders wedged up between them.
Those are the drawbacks that I've encountered.


2021 Arctic Fox 1150
'15 F350 6.7 diesel dually long bed
Eagle Cap Owners
“The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity."
-Yeats

sbryan@vtbryans.com

Vermont

Senior Member

Joined: 04/22/2010

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/08/21 08:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bighatnohorse has covered two of the most common reasons. The narrower profile of a SRW will simply allow you to get to more remote places where the roads are very narrow and where canting the truck will place more stress on the camper and truck, especially with high COG campers. And rocks between tires can lead to flats. Duallys are certainly more stable and have greater carrying capacity but so far I have been happy with my SRW for the last 60,000 miles.


Shawn
2013 Ford F350 6.7 CCLB Ruby Red SRW, sway bar, Bilsteins, etc
2007 Cyclone toyhauler, 18,000 GVWR
Northstar Igloo 9.5
https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-2J3zF6J/0/M/i-2J3zF6J-M.jpg
US Army retired


silverbullet555

Boise

Senior Member

Joined: 05/28/2020

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 08/08/21 08:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It all depends on how off the beaten path you want to be. I don't have a dually, but I do take our camper of the beaten path some. Some of those roads get sketchy with ruts, rocks, etc. Downed trees that are pushed aside make it a tight fit sometimes.

Conversely, there are places that I go that the forest service road is wide enough for cars to pass each other easily. They are more traveled and generally maintained 1 to 2 times per year.


1995 Northland Grizzly 860. 2355 lbs of purple goodness! Sold
2005 Lance 845 - Baby Bertha
2007 Chevy Silverado 2500HD Classic CC SB 4WD
Torklift mounts
Torklift superhitch
Hellwig swaybar and 3500lb helper springs
2002 Cobalt 226 "Baby Blue"

jimh425

Western MT

Senior Member

Joined: 06/11/2006

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 08/08/21 08:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One thing to keep in mind is that most TCs don’t do that well off road either. So, depending on what you buy, you may/may not be able to do anything other than simple gravel/dirt roads without damaging the TC or bending the frame of your truck. In that case, a DRW isn’t much of a handicap.

You also have to look at the height as well. Extremely tall vehicles won’t do well on roads with many branches across the road. DRWs can also have a traction issue compared to SRWs since the rear tires don’t exactly follow the front tires. This is an issue in mud/snow.

If the roads you plan to travel are nearby, go drive them and think about what they would be like with the TC you plan to carry onboard.


'10 Ford F-450, 6.4, 4.30, 4x4, 14,500 GVWR, '06 Host Rainer 950 Dbl Slide, Torklift Talon tiedowns, Glow Steps, and Fastguns. Bilstein 4600s, Firestone Air Bags, Toyo M655 225/19.5 Gs, Curt front hitch, Energy Suspension bump stops.


Kayteg1

California > Nevada

Senior Member

Joined: 06/18/2015

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 08/08/21 08:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It all depends on off-roading.
When I got my truck stuck on blow sand on the beach, there was a guy who was pulling out everybody, including 5-ers.
He drove Dodge dually.
On soft ground it is floatation that matters.
Also the width limit apply to US-build trucks.
Lately new trend is using Sprinter 4x4 vans for off-roading.
Lot of them are duallies, when dually Sprinter is still 7 ft wide.

[image]

* This post was edited 08/08/21 09:02am by Kayteg1 *





Rscconrad

Illinois

New Member

Joined: 02/21/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 08/08/21 09:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks guys. Good explanations. I figured ruts were involved but never considered rocks between the dualies.

rexlion

Broken Arrow OK

Senior Member

Joined: 04/01/2005

View Profile



Posted: 08/08/21 11:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So, SRW drivers are more likely to get into a rut? [emoticon]


Mike G.
Liberty is meaningless where the right to utter one's thoughts and opinions has ceased to exist. That, of all rights, is the dread of tyrants. --Frederick Douglass
photo: Yosemite Valley view from Taft Point


Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 08/08/21 01:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Rscconrad wrote:

Thanks guys. Good explanations. I figured ruts were involved but never considered rocks between the dualies.


Although a very general question, since posted in TC forum, considering “off road” with any TC that would reasonably be hauled on a dually (bigger campers), I don’t see any measurable gain in performance with a srw over a drw. If anything, a srw is less stable with a narrower rear wheelbase making a drw preferable or at least not a hindrance anywhere one would be “off roading” with a very heavy 8’ wide x 12’ tall box intentionally placed on their truck.

Lose the camper and a srw becomes much more preferable for the reasons mentioned and just overall narrower.


2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Why SRW off road?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.