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 > Anyone with 12v Air Conditioning Experience?

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pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 08/16/21 06:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There was a recent thread on air conditioners--it included several 'new to me' brands.

Here is a link from that thread: https://www.truckcamperadventure.com/8-b........conditioners-for-truck-campers-and-vans/


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, soon to have SiO2 batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

S Davis

Western WA

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Posted: 08/16/21 07:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wanderingaimlessly wrote:

S Davis wrote:

wanderingaimlessly wrote:

Not an AC expert, but have watched the threads in here and other places and dont really understand why more folks dont try or use mini splits, some small units are as high as 18 SEER to help with energy usage, and have seen some 8000-9000 btuh units with 650-800 watt energy consumption when operating. If operating consumption is that low, it seems a solar package of 1000 watts or more with a battery bank in the 500 AHr range should give a small camper at least several hours a day of usage.


There are inverter driven window shakers that could work without the copper line set to leak. Mini splits can run at pressures above 500 psi so I would have concerns about the flair connections.

understandable, but window units I thought were low efficiency and prone to a lot of heat/cooling loss due to design. And mini splits are available in a wide variety of sizes and SEER ratings.
And the question here was to dry, no hook up camping, NOT pedistal to pedistal.


There are inverter driven window units that are up to 15 seer, I just bought one to try in a hard to cool spot in our house. I am curious what the starting amp draw is on it.

adamis

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Posted: 08/16/21 10:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

To add to the discussion, I found this chart that gives an estimate of the BTUs needed to cool a particular square footage. Looks like ~5000 BTUs is enough to cool 150 square feet which is about what a truck camper is I think.

The Dometic Coolair 1000RTX provides 4,094 BTUs so I think it would be a bit undersized for the job. The RTX 2000 however looks like a better contender with 6,824 BTUs of cooling capacity. I know in my original post a mentioned the RTX 3000 but in light of this information, it seems overkill. I also didn't realize there was an RTX 2000 until someone mentioned it earlier in this thread.


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bigfootford

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Posted: 08/17/21 09:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

adamis wrote:

To add to the discussion, I found this chart that gives an estimate of the BTUs needed to cool a particular square footage. Looks like ~5000 BTUs is enough to cool 150 square feet which is about what a truck camper is I think.

The Dometic Coolair 1000RTX provides 4,094 BTUs so I think it would be a bit undersized for the job. The RTX 2000 however looks like a better contender with 6,824 BTUs of cooling capacity. I know in my original post a mentioned the RTX 3000 but in light of this information, it seems overkill. I also didn't realize there was an RTX 2000 until someone mentioned it earlier in this thread.


During this summers smoke and heat I put a 5000btu window unit temporarily in my BF's kitchen sliding window. To cool the camper from 98 inside and 100+ outside it took a couple of hrs to get the camper into the low 80's. Once cool the AC started cycling and it was comfortable at about 78.. The bed area was really slow to cool off at the head of the bed. I have a nice 12vdc fan that I was able to position to make the cool air get into the bed area.

The AC pulls about 4 amps in cooling mode compressor running.

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Posted: 08/17/21 10:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

adamis wrote:

To add to the discussion, I found this chart that gives an estimate of the BTUs needed to cool a particular square footage. Looks like ~5000 BTUs is enough to cool 150 square feet which is about what a truck camper is I think.
RVs are poorly insulated compared to a house. Your TC BTU requirements are likely much higher.


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S Davis

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Posted: 08/17/21 05:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

adamis wrote:

To add to the discussion, I found this chart that gives an estimate of the BTUs needed to cool a particular square footage. Looks like ~5000 BTUs is enough to cool 150 square feet which is about what a truck camper is I think.

The Dometic Coolair 1000RTX provides 4,094 BTUs so I think it would be a bit undersized for the job. The RTX 2000 however looks like a better contender with 6,824 BTUs of cooling capacity. I know in my original post a mentioned the RTX 3000 but in light of this information, it seems overkill. I also didn't realize there was an RTX 2000 until someone mentioned it earlier in this thread.


Be careful using a residential heat calc to gauge what you need, I just took 10 min and did a heat loss calc with the lowest R-value in my heat loss program which is R-11, also this does not account for any air leakage through storage compartments or other penetrations in the exterior.

This is figured with the cab over facing north, no shade on south wall. Single pane windows with blinds.

8'X10' area(80 square feet)
R-11 walls, ceiling, floor.
20sqft windows.
15sqft door
8sqft dual plastic skylight.
98 degree outdoor
74 degree indoor

Heat loss:4265btu
Heat Gain:3932btu

I would bet actuals are at least 30%-50% higher depending on the insulation and air leakage of your camper. Also if the larger wall was facing south it would increase the heat gain.

adamis

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Posted: 08/27/21 04:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is an interesting test. Granted, it was done in ideal conditions but still quite impressive. The 100ah Victron LiFePo4 battery lasted for 2 hours and 40 minutes. They are supposedly going to do an outdoor test tomorrow.

https://youtu.be/2LL7lE4wXvs

JoeChiOhki

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Posted: 08/27/21 04:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

S Davis wrote:

adamis wrote:

To add to the discussion, I found this chart that gives an estimate of the BTUs needed to cool a particular square footage. Looks like ~5000 BTUs is enough to cool 150 square feet which is about what a truck camper is I think.

The Dometic Coolair 1000RTX provides 4,094 BTUs so I think it would be a bit undersized for the job. The RTX 2000 however looks like a better contender with 6,824 BTUs of cooling capacity. I know in my original post a mentioned the RTX 3000 but in light of this information, it seems overkill. I also didn't realize there was an RTX 2000 until someone mentioned it earlier in this thread.


Be careful using a residential heat calc to gauge what you need, I just took 10 min and did a heat loss calc with the lowest R-value in my heat loss program which is R-11, also this does not account for any air leakage through storage compartments or other penetrations in the exterior.

This is figured with the cab over facing north, no shade on south wall. Single pane windows with blinds.

8'X10' area(80 square feet)
R-11 walls, ceiling, floor.
20sqft windows.
15sqft door
8sqft dual plastic skylight.
98 degree outdoor
74 degree indoor

Heat loss:4265btu
Heat Gain:3932btu

I would bet actuals are at least 30%-50% higher depending on the insulation and air leakage of your camper. Also if the larger wall was facing south it would increase the heat gain.


Aye for RVs, you'll need to use R4 for the insulation in almost all the mass produced units (Standard rating of Polystyrene insulation at 1 1/2" thick), as few to none use Polyisocynaurate insulation.


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burningman

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Posted: 08/27/21 10:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I’ve tried using a 5000 BTU “window shaker” in desert heat in an 11.5 footer, it was totally inadequate.
Cars have low square footage but their AC systems are extremely powerful, usually somewhere around 30,000 - 40,000 BTU.
That’s because vehicles have less insulation, and people want them to cool off quickly when super hot.
It’s similar with campers. They come with seemingly oversized units for a reason.


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HMS Beagle

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Posted: 08/28/21 09:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

adamis wrote:

Here is an interesting test. Granted, it was done in ideal conditions but still quite impressive. The 100ah Victron LiFePo4 battery lasted for 2 hours and 40 minutes. They are supposedly going to do an outdoor test tomorrow.

https://youtu.be/2LL7lE4wXvs


Interesting test, even if they presenter is completely clueless on just about every aspect of it. Since it was in a closed room with the thermostat set below ambient, it would have run the whole time without cycling (and would be heating the room a bit). I doubt it would use much more outside in hot temps, the high side pressure will increase just a bit. If you added 400 watts of solar you could keep it going pretty much as long as the sun shines.


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