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4x4ord

Alberta

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Joined: 12/23/2010

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Posted: 08/19/21 08:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

After setting the type of brakes you have (electric or electric over hydraulic) you can adjust the trailer brake gain setting. You should probably start with your controller set at about 6. At about 20 mph slide the manual trailer brake lever fully to the left …. If the trailer tires lock up on dry pavement back the setting off … it the tires rotate freely turn the setting higher. The goal is to adjust so that maximum braking can be achieved without wheel lock up. I am often at about 17000 lbs so a little over my trailer’s GVWR and my wheels will lock up at 6.5 on pavement.

[image]

* This post was edited 08/19/21 08:31am by 4x4ord *


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Crespro

SoCal

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Posted: 08/19/21 04:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

4x4ord wrote:

After setting the type of brakes you have (electric or electric over hydraulic) you can adjust the trailer brake gain setting. You should probably start with your controller set at about 6. At about 20 mph slide the manual trailer brake lever fully to the left …. If the trailer tires lock up on dry pavement back the setting off … it the tires rotate freely turn the setting higher. The goal is to adjust so that maximum braking can be achieved without wheel lock up. I am often at about 17000 lbs so a little over my trailer’s GVWR and my wheels will lock up at 6.5 on pavement.

[image]


Thanks. Good info. I will do this test.


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LanceRKeys

Amarillo, TX

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Posted: 08/19/21 07:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I wish my trailer brakes worked that well!

4x4ord

Alberta

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Posted: 08/19/21 07:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LanceRKeys wrote:

I wish my trailer brakes worked that well!


That's what you get with electric over hydraulic disc brakes .... square tires.[emoticon]

Groover

Pulaski, TN

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Posted: 08/20/21 06:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

4x4ord wrote:

LanceRKeys wrote:

I wish my trailer brakes worked that well!


That's what you get with electric over hydraulic disc brakes .... square tires.[emoticon]


I also get strong, consistent and well modulated stops. The only time that I got flat spots on my tires was when I forgot to adjust the brakes for being unloaded. Since my electric over hydraulic brakes are on an equipment trailer there is about a 3 to 1 weight difference between loaded and unloaded so the adjustment really needs to be made. It probably wouldn't be much of an issue on a camping trailer. My only complaint about the electric over hydraulic brakes is that it does take a fraction of a second for the brakes to pump up when stopping. But that is a lot better than running red lights due to brakes not delivering when needed.

Since I have a gravel driveway I generally set my trailer brakes to skid on gravel then fine tune them on the road to match the truck brakes.

One thing to remember about daisy-chain leaf springs is that when braking they are prone to skidding the front axle. This is due the way the torque on the axles shift weight to the rear axle. This generally isn't an issue except in panic stops anyway so you are probably best off with a setting that locks the front brakes every now and then. I have pulled a trailer with only rear brakes and lifted the front axle off the ground in a hard stop. At least I got good braking effort for that stop.

4x4ord

Alberta

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Posted: 08/20/21 04:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^^^ Judging by the skid marks and worn tires it is likely that all four wheels started skidding, then just the front axle. The front tires are both shot where as I don’t see flat spots on the rears. The skid marks started out black as coal and then got just a slight shade lighter and carried on for a couple hundred feet or so. The driver said when she heard the screeching she backed off a touch on her brake application …. There was actually a 14 foot enclosed motorcycle trailer hooked up behind the fiver, which did not have power going to it’s brakes, so things could have been worse if it had decided to jackknife.

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