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 > Cracked rim on 2007 2500hd classic

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ticki2

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Posted: 08/21/21 06:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

3500 srw had 7 in wide steel wheels .


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valhalla360

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Posted: 08/21/21 06:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

3 tons wrote:

AFAIK, alloy rims in heavy duty applications (e.g. 3/4 & 1 ton) are forged and not cast…A forged wheel will NOT manifest a crack, but it will twist (*not unlike a popcorn kernel)…Most after market wheels are cheap ($$) because they are not forged, and I see these wheels on wannabee HD trucks all the time (tough guy looks trump safety and common sense…), even with heavy campers on them…Soon to be winners of the Darwin Award…

* for the unqualified naysayers, this IS what happened to my alloy Dually wheel when broadsided by a woman on a cell-phone - yes, forged aluminum will TWIST and wadd up exhibiting NO SIGNS of a crack…

3 tons


Aluminum is malleable but not ductile.
Steel is both malleable and ductile.

A common example of how that works, Outboard legs are typically aluminum. If the bottom skeg gets bent from hitting a log:
- If you grab it with a big set of vice grips and try to bend it back, it will typically break off...because it's not ductile.
- If you place a wood block to stop it moving and use a hammer to pound it back into shape, it typically works without cracking because it is malleable.

Ductile is the ability to bend and stretch without failure.
Malleable is the ability to be hammered or beat into a new shape.

So depending on how the failure occurred, the rim could simply bend/twist the metal or it could crack the metal.


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silverbullet555

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Posted: 08/21/21 08:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

specta wrote:

silverbullet555 wrote:



No! The OP here, me, had a wheel crack. The wheels on the truck are factory original the best of my knowledge. However, I DID buy an extra wheel that was supposed to be a factory GM wheel. It is entirely possible I was sold an inferior product and that is what is cracked. I'll find out this weekend when I pull another wheel off the truck and when I check my second set of wheels in storage.


I hope the others are good so you only have to buy one replacement.


Me too


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silverbullet555

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Posted: 08/21/21 08:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ticki2 wrote:


An original OEM GM PYO aluminum wheel has everything printed under the center cap , no need to pull the wheel just remove the cap .


Good to know.

jimh406

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Posted: 08/21/21 09:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

Aluminum is malleable but not ductile.
Steel is both malleable and ductile.


Of course, “aluminum” wheels are usually alloys of different metals and some are cast and some are not.

Steel can also vary.

Both can vary in hardness and construction method and amount of impurities.


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valhalla360

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Posted: 08/21/21 11:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jimh425 wrote:

valhalla360 wrote:

Aluminum is malleable but not ductile.
Steel is both malleable and ductile.


Of course, “aluminum” wheels are usually alloys of different metals and some are cast and some are not.

Steel can also vary.

Both can vary in hardness and construction method and amount of impurities.


Steel by definition is an alloy. Pure iron is not steel.

Aluminum also is always an alloy.

While there is some variability in how ductile or malleable they are, as a rule, they follow a pattern, so a crack doesn't imply an alloy or production method. Most likely it was how the force was applied.

jimh406

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Posted: 08/21/21 12:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

Steel by definition is an alloy. Pure iron is not steel.

Aluminum also is always an alloy.

While there is some variability in how ductile or malleable they are, as a rule, they follow a pattern, so a crack doesn't imply an alloy or production method. Most likely it was how the force was applied.


Aluminum is an element.

If you are talking a skeg made by only a few boat manufacturers, it problably is a very specific alloy. If you are talking about other types of Aluminum alloy treated or annealed to different hardnesses, the breakage can look a lot different. Sometimes a break, but depending on how soft, how it’s made, cast or forged, and the breakage can vary alot.

Look at this guys article that is a decent writeup on Aluminum alloys, so you don’t have to take my word for it. Not saying it covers everything, but he does explain the differences in Aluminum alloys, and some of the differences. They don’t all break/bend the same.

https://www.shapesbyhydro.com/en/materi........e-the-best-aluminium-alloys-for-bending/

Kayteg1

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Posted: 08/21/21 01:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Pure aluminium if extremely soft material. Used on old-fashioned tee kettles, who would dent by dropping table spoon on them.
Last year I bought patio boat with damaged ponton and after replacing it, used old pontoon as cover for my pool slide.
Cut it along and peeled open, where the bottom had 3 ft long dent on it.
I walk my 220 lb over the dent, jump on it and even it flexed slightly - it would not bend back. The thing is build with aircraft-quality aluminium alloy.
Some military grade aluminium alloys can be stronger than steel.





3 tons

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Posted: 08/22/21 11:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jimh425 wrote:

valhalla360 wrote:

Steel by definition is an alloy. Pure iron is not steel.

Aluminum also is always an alloy.

While there is some variability in how ductile or malleable they are, as a rule, they follow a pattern, so a crack doesn't imply an alloy or production method. Most likely it was how the force was applied.


Aluminum is an element.

If you are talking a skeg made by only a few boat manufacturers, it problably is a very specific alloy. If you are talking about other types of Aluminum alloy treated or annealed to different hardnesses, the breakage can look a lot different. Sometimes a break, but depending on how soft, how it’s made, cast or forged, and the breakage can vary alot.

Look at this guys article that is a decent writeup on Aluminum alloys, so you don’t have to take my word for it. Not saying it covers everything, but he does explain the differences in Aluminum alloys, and some of the differences. They don’t all break/bend the same.

https://www.shapesbyhydro.com/en/materi........e-the-best-aluminium-alloys-for-bending/


I’m not aware of anyone who has the unique ability to specify a certain alloy for his wheels, AFAIK, the choice amounts to either cast or forged, and sometimes even this can be difficult to determine…

3 tons

mkirsch

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Posted: 08/23/21 07:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jimh425 wrote:

mkirsch wrote:

I thought rim ratings didn't matter, rims never break...


Naw, you seem to be confusing adding 200 lbs past a wheel rating with 1500 lbs.


Naw I'm talking about all the "advice" given in this forum to put LT E-rated truck tires on half ton rims and pumping them up to 80PSI on a rim rated for 44PSI.

There's no point to putting an LT tire on if you are not going to air it up. At "half ton" pressures (i.e. 44PSI and under) the tire has no more load carrying capacity than the stock P-metric tires.


Putting 10-ply tires on half ton trucks since aught-four.

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