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Open Roads Forum  >  RV Pet Stop  >  Dogs

 > Views on when to/not to allow a dog to be social

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BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 08/26/21 05:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dogs are socializing (communicating) long before they get nose to nose. Be a dog, read what they are saying to one another before you decide to let them get nose to nose.

We generally don’t let our dogs socialize with dogs we don’t know. Most breeds don’t “speak herding” and this can cause friction.

Acampingwewillgo

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Posted: 08/26/21 07:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting topic!
Over the years the dogs we have had(collies and Cavaliers mostly), have always been social but always controlled under tight leash. Now we have an adopted wire haired Dachsaund who is a Napolean type. He's had socialization issues since his first week with us some 5 years ago. Once he knows you, it's fine but I'm very, very careful about anyone or other dogs approaching him without me grabbing him by the collar.

I know, I'm a terrible trainer but this is the first time in 50 years of dog ownership I've experienced this. But we make it work, still love the LiL guy!!!????


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Campinghoss@51

Windsor NC

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Posted: 08/27/21 04:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have no problem with our large dog greeting other dogs and people. However as already stated I do a quick observation of the dog AND its owner. Then I always ask. I do not use those darn retractable leashes and always have a firm grip for a just in case. Our small dog is more introverted than Lucky and prefers to mind her own business. We respect that.


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BigfootBill

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Posted: 08/27/21 04:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Getting the puppy out into the big world isn't just about learning other dogs and interactions within the canine community, it is about other objects/sensations they haven't been exposed to and all of the different types of humans - tall, short, bearded, hat wearing. See the attached article that defines socialization.

https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/training/dont-panic-training-through-and-around-puppy-fear-periods/


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Deb and Ed M

SW MI & Space Coast, FL USA

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Posted: 08/27/21 08:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm probably a hypocrite, too? Owning a young Aussie (and being an Olde Pharte myself) means I can not adequately exercise 45-lb Augie when he must be constantly on a leash when we winter in FL. Therefore, we go to our local dog park several times each week - we tend to go in the late morning when there are fewer dogs. That being said - Augie is super-social, and simply wants to find a buddy to run with. His energy level tends to attract other herding breeds (who "get" him, as Mark points out) but pitbulls and "doodles" seem up for a good game of tag with a crazy dog, too. Ben, my 20 lb miniaussiedoodle, "identifies" as a large dog, and if the big-dog side of the park is a "friendly mix", I allow him to play there. If I see dogs with high prey drives, Ben goes in the small-dog side for a game of fetch.

But when we're out-and-about, I generally don't let them socialize unless it's a dog/owner we have experience with. The people who go to our dog park are "dog people" - their dogs are well-trained and socialized. The general public (even campers) - maybe not so much. I figure it's my job as dog mom to make sure my dogs don't have a scary experience.

I also have to add that last year, Ben picked up Bordetella at the dog park - apparently a variant that got past his yearly vaccination against that virus. It was mild and lasted about a week - but points out that socializing also carries risks if your dogs aren't FULLY vaccinated. (I also opt for dog flu vaccinations)

Deb and Ed M

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Posted: 08/27/21 08:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Conversely, a good, well-socialized older dog can remind a young dog of their "manners" better than any human can. I remember when Augie was about 6 months old and full of himself "fastest dog in the park" - he met Lady Quinn. A GORGEOUS blue merle Aussie about a year older than Augie - and he pestered her, poked her, barked at her....until she ran him down (effortlessly) and proceeded to "kill" him. This cycled a few times, until he finally realized he wasn't that fast/cool/fun; and he started treating her with kindly respect, at which point she began to play with him. That lesson stuck with him - he is pretty good about leaving elderly dogs (or ones with prickly temperments) alone. If a dog growls at him, he simply walks away to find someone more fun. That's a pretty valuable lesson, IMO.

He also makes a point to greet every human at the dog park - for a breed that can be somewhat standoffish - that's good socialization, too.

Crowe

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Posted: 08/28/21 06:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks, all. In some ways I still feel it's a little contradictory but I understand the parameters give. Big test today-we are taking him to the nature preserve near us for a walk. I am working on leash training but I'll be the first to say it's not going that great LOL! Probably fine for a 14 week old puppy but he needs lots of work. There will be people, other dogs, maybe horses and lots of smells. Add a pokey old springer to the mix and it should be lots of fun!


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Lantley

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Posted: 08/28/21 09:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting to me is that dogs are bound to adapt to the traits of the owner.
If the owner is nervous, the dog will be nervous. If the owner is agressive the dog will be aggressive. If the owner is laid back the dog will be laid back.
The owners personality will be an influence before any socialization even begins!


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toedtoes

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Posted: 08/28/21 01:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lantley wrote:

Interesting to me is that dogs are bound to adapt to the traits of the owner.
If the owner is nervous, the dog will be nervous. If the owner is agressive the dog will be aggressive. If the owner is laid back the dog will be laid back.
The owners personality will be an influence before any socialization even begins!


I disagree with that. I don't see like creates like in the personality of dogs.

An aggressive owner is just as likely to instill nervousness and fear into their dog as they are aggression. A nervous owner is just as likely to have an aggressive dog as a nervous one. And some dogs are well adjusted despite all the well meaning efforts of the owner.

IMO, creating a unbalanced dog has more to do with not understanding the breed/puppy, failure to build a strong bond of trust between owner and dog, and/or abuse or trauma.

And an aggressive or nervous dog can become a well adjusted dog with trust and understanding.


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Crowe

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Posted: 08/28/21 01:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

And an aggressive or nervous dog can become a well adjusted dog with trust and understanding.

We have one such dog in my puppy kindergarten class. Thursday was our 4th meeting. The dog is finally calming down and becoming a good K-9 citizen. We all had doubts but the group and the trainer worked together to help her behave.

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