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adamstee

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Posted: 09/07/21 01:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My 2009 GMG Yukon XL Denali (with factory tow package) is rated for 7900 lbs.
If I adhere to weight restrictions and weight distribution upgrades, can I safely tow a trailer with a 7,038 lbs. dry weight? Thanks

mkirsch

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Posted: 09/07/21 01:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Safely, yes. Provided your Yukon is well maintained, has good tires and brakes, the trailer is well maintained, has good tires and brakes, the WD system is properly setup and rated to support the actual weight of the trailer.

It will not, however, be within the weight ratings of the Yukon if that is important to you. You will exceed one or more of the ratings of the Yukon, be that axle, GVWR, GCWR or receiver hitch rating.

Dry weight means empty trailer, nothing in it or on it. That means no propane or batteries, no water, nothing. Possibly not even an air conditioner or other optional equipment. Time all is said and done you will end up adding at least 1000-1500lbs to the weight of the trailer by the time you fill everything up and pack for camping.

Most importantly you will probably not be happy with the performance and handling. It will be slow and sluggish compared to the tow vehicle by itself.


Putting 10-ply tires on half ton trucks since aught-four.

wanderingaimlessly

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Posted: 09/07/21 01:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OK you have 860 lbs total available.
Now add,,,,,
Weight dist Hitch*********************100 lbs
2 tanks and propane********************80 lbs
a group 27 battery*********************40 lbs
you now have 640 left, on tow capacity and have added no food, clothing, lawn chairs, nothing, not even enough water to flush the toilet.
Light packers tend to have close to 1000 lbs in a trailer, most end up higher, a few very cautious ones get by with less.
And dont even begin to consider kids and their friends stuff.
Also check your cargo capacity on the Yukon, at an 8000 lb trailer, you will be around 1200 pounds on the hitch, which counts against your payload, also anyone else travelling with you and all of the cargo in the back count toward that number, is it ok there?

Happy motorin

Lwiddis

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Posted: 09/07/21 01:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You may be within total trailer weight but I don't think you'll be within the Yukon's payload max. Who and what will you be carrying in the Yukon?

13 to 15% tongue weight is a good thing for sway prevention.


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QCMan

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Posted: 09/07/21 01:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Don't look at dry weight as it is meaningless. Look at max trailer weight that falls within your capabilities. Work backwards from there figuring payload capacity minus whatever and whoever will be in the vehicle while traveling minus 15% of the max trailer weight on the tongue. Then subtract the 80 pounds for propane and 40 pounds for a battery and roughly 100 pounds for the hitch. You will come up with a very negative number if you start out with a 7900 pound max weight trailer. Work the numbers to find what weight trailer you can really tow.


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toedtoes

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Posted: 09/07/21 02:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

To bullet comments:

1. Do no use dry weight of trailer to determine towing limits. Dry weight does not include water, propane, all the stuff you add in, etc. In some cases it doesn't even include the AC unit, etc. For an unknown trailer, always use the GVWR (gross vehicle weight rating) to pair it with your tow vehicle. With an unknown tow vehicle, always use the actual loaded weight of your trailer (if owned) or GVWR (if not purchased yet).

2. Along with the towing capacity of the vehicle, you will most likely be limited by the payload (or CCC or cargo capacity) of the tow vehicle. The payload is often the limiting factor - especially for families.

3. For many RVers, the preference is to stay at or below 15 percent of each the tow capacity AND payload. This provides a"cushion" for performance so the tow vehicle is not always maxed out on every trip. Some RVers will go all the way to the limits and be happy. It is all about your own comfort level, your vehicle and trailer's drivability, and the roads you travel. If you only drive flat roads or short distances, your experience at the limits will be different than if you drive in mountains or long distances. Your own familiarity with towing will have a bearing on this.

Calculations to do:

10-15 percent of trailer's GVWR = tongue weight

Trailer's GVWR <= vehicle towing capacity

Weight of all passengers and pets, weight of all supplies carried in the vehicle, on the roof, or on a hitch, weight over 150lbs for driver, PLUS tongue weight of trailer <= vehicle payload

If the last two calculations are true, then you are within the limits. At this point, you need to determine if you want that "cushion" and, if so, how much you want it to be.


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Dadoffourgirls

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Posted: 09/07/21 02:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The hitch is only rated for 1000lbs. You will be very close to exceeding that.


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Reno

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Posted: 09/07/21 06:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Is best to have a large safety cushion especially if towing in the mountains, or wet weather conditions or at night in inclement wx conditions or mountains.

When towing in the Rockies and west coast mountains I always had too much truck (Ram 2500 V10 4x4) for a 28 foot 5000 lb trailer with and without a WDH. On the plains of Texas I used a Ram 1500 V8 RWD and WDH with no problems for same TT.

Terryallan

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Posted: 09/07/21 06:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

adamstee wrote:

My 2009 GMG Yukon XL Denali (with factory tow package) is rated for 7900 lbs.
If I adhere to weight restrictions and weight distribution upgrades, can I safely tow a trailer with a 7,038 lbs. dry weight? Thanks


No


Terry & Shay
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Grit dog

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Posted: 09/07/21 06:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would, if I didn’t have a bigger tow rig or a smaller trailer. But if you have to ask, I’d say no, because you don’t have a lot of experience towing and a 4 ton high profile trailer is about all that Burb will want.
Also depends on distance, geography and frequency.
Couple short tips to the state park in “home”, wherever that is, provided it’s flat and low altitude, sure.
Couple trips a month through the Rockies, Blue Ridge or Sierras, or cross country runs, you’ll be runnin that Burb real hard.
Mostly drivetrain and suspension. The LS3 has good power and is a good towing engine.


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