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Open Roads Forum  >  Towing

 > ProPride and lifted 3500

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ApexAZ

Gilbert, AZ

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Posted: 09/10/21 07:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi all,

We just applied for financing on a 2021 Fuel F-287.

Assuming the loan gets approved, we should be picking the unit up on the 18th. I have a 2020 Denali 3500 SRW that I put a 4" suspension lift and larger 35" tires on, which put us just a wee bit too high to fit a 5th wheel, so we opted for a bumper pull.

A couple questions I have are:

My truck is rated at 20k conventional hitch weight with 2k tongue weight, and a CGVW of 29700. The trailer has a GVWR of 12,800 and I'm guessing the truck probably weighs in around 8500 curb weight (I plan to try and weigh it soon if I can find a place), which will put me at around 22.5k max combined weight when factoring in passengers and added cargo. Obviously the lift and bigger tires reduce capacity, but does anyone know just how much? I'll still be about 7k under the stock CGVW and conventional hitch figure.

Does anyone have a similar truck who have upgraded their brakes? Is this an option to improve stopping power?

I'm looking at the ProPride 3P hitch. Trailer sway makes me nervous and the lift compounds that. I'm hoping this will make towing safer. Anyone have experience with these and are they worth the $? If they work as advertised, it seems like money well spent for added safety. Any cons? It seems to add a few feet to overall length. Should I assume I'll need some air bags too?

I have seen several comments on various forums that people replace the stock hitch receiver with a class 5. In looking at some of those, the ratings are all very similar to that 2k/20k capacity, so I'm wondering if that's something I should worry about, or is the stock one already a class 5 and sufficient? I can't seem to find any info on the GMC pages.

Thanks so much!

Brian

n0arp

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Posted: 09/10/21 08:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Check your wheel ratings. Method makes a nice wheel called the NV305HD that has a 4500lb capacity per wheel, if your current ones aren't sufficient. A lot of aftermarket wheels have poor capacities. Also check your tire capacity - though most 35" tires should be higher in capacity than the factory tires, I've seen quite a few American Standard sizes where that isn't the case. Most metric sizes have higher load indexes. YMMV.

Be aware of your rear axle capacity, and confirm where you are loaded with the trailer, at the scales.

I wouldn't bother upgrading brakes on the truck. Upgrading the trailer to EoH disc, on the other hand, is one of the best safety investments you'll ever make.

I had the ProPride 3P many years ago, and it worked as advertised. Worth the money in my opinion. The biggest con is the somewhat reduced ground clearance because they hang low. There is also a slight learning curve to hooking up, but it's mostly mitigated with a backup camera.

I would not use air bags. They have a cult following on here, but are not all they're cracked up to be. A proper spring pack is the real answer, or helper springs like SuperSprings. I'm pretty sure the air bags they sell for the GM 3500s are all inboard of the frame, which will exacerbate sway, regardless of marketing or claims otherwise.

Your stock receiver should be fine, but double check the ratings. I think on my Chevrolet 2500 the stock receiver was rated for something like 14 or 15K.


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ApexAZ

Gilbert, AZ

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Posted: 09/10/21 08:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

n0arp wrote:

Check your wheel ratings. Method makes a nice wheel called the NV305HD that has a 4500lb capacity per wheel, if your current ones aren't sufficient. A lot of aftermarket wheels have poor capacities.

Be aware of your rear axle capacity, and confirm where you are loaded with the trailer, at the scales.

I wouldn't bother upgrading brakes on the truck. Upgrading the trailer to EoH disc, on the other hand, is worth doing.



Thanks.

Wheels are XD Monster III's rated at 3640 and the tires are Toyo AT Open Country rated around the same. My rear axle is rated for 7250 so I think I should be fine? Or should I consider higher capacity wheels?

The trailer tongue weight is 1400 lbs, but obviously this will change once I add the ProPride and add cargo, toys, etc. I assume I should still be under the 2k limit on the truck. I do plan to find some scales once I have the trailer and everything dialed in.

I'll check around on the trailer brake upgrades.

n0arp

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Posted: 09/10/21 08:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If I recall correctly my '15 Chevy 2500 had around 3500lbs on the rear axle from the factory.

3500+2000=5500, so even if you load it down quite heavily, you should be okay. But check the scales to be sure.

ApexAZ

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Posted: 09/10/21 08:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

n0arp wrote:

If I recall correctly my '15 Chevy 2500 had around 3500lbs on the rear axle from the factory.

3500+2000=5500, so even if you load it down quite heavily, you should be okay. But check the scales to be sure.


I've never been to a commercial scale so I'm not sure how I would do this?

Just pull to the front of the scale so that the front tires are off, but the back are still on?

And then for tongue weight, just weight the truck and then weigh again with the trailer attached behind the scale and subtract the truck weight to find the difference?

n0arp

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Posted: 09/10/21 08:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ApexAZ wrote:

n0arp wrote:

If I recall correctly my '15 Chevy 2500 had around 3500lbs on the rear axle from the factory.

3500+2000=5500, so even if you load it down quite heavily, you should be okay. But check the scales to be sure.


I've never been to a commercial scale so I'm not sure how I would do this?

Just pull to the front of the scale so that the front tires are off, but the back are still on?

And then for tongue weight, just weight the truck and then weigh again with the trailer attached behind the scale and subtract the truck weight to find the difference?


Most CAT scales have three pads. Park on the scale so your front tires are on the front, rear tires on the middle, and trailer tires on the rear. It'll give you three weights - steer, drive, and trailer. Then yeah, just disconect the trailer and swing back around for your reweigh.

Or you can build your own corner scale for a few hundred dollars. I posted a guide for one on here - the thread was titled "Homemade Tire Scale".

blt2ski

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Posted: 09/10/21 08:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Simple method to figure out you lower rating is old diam tire/new diam tire times rear ratio. (32/35)3.73 = 3.41 effective axel ratio.
If you were stock at 31", then you are down to a 3.3 effective ratio.
I'm assuming you have a DMAX with that high of a GCWR. Being as 3.73 is the only ratio, no way to tell where you really are per say now in comparison. SWG about 88% or 26,300 +/-.
Remember gcwr is a performance/warranty rating only. Question becomes, what performance are you looking at etc. Holding 60 in DOD vs OD vs Direct at 1800 rpm......pulling an X% grade with out stalling in 1st gear.
Marty


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n0arp

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Posted: 09/10/21 08:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

blt2ski wrote:

Simple method to figure out you lower rating is old diam tire/new diam tire times rear ratio. (32/35)3.73 = 3.41 effective axel ratio.
If you were stock at 31", then you are down to a 3.3 effective ratio.
I'm assuming you have a DMAX with that high of a GCWR. Being as 3.73 is the only ratio, no way to tell where you really are per say now in comparison. SWG about 88% or 26,300 +/-.
Remember gcwr is a performance/warranty rating only. Question becomes, what performance are you looking at etc. Holding 60 in DOD vs OD vs Direct at 1800 rpm......pulling an X% grade with out stalling in 1st gear.
Marty


The Duramax or any truck with that much torque is pretty good about overlooking 35" tires. Mine was on 35s and hauling a 16K fiver without issues, and that was before I tuned it. It was just a LML, not the more powerful L5P which would have the performance mine had with the tow tune I ran.

ApexAZ

Gilbert, AZ

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Posted: 09/10/21 09:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

blt2ski wrote:

Simple method to figure out you lower rating is old diam tire/new diam tire times rear ratio. (32/35)3.73 = 3.41 effective axel ratio.
If you were stock at 31", then you are down to a 3.3 effective ratio.
I'm assuming you have a DMAX with that high of a GCWR. Being as 3.73 is the only ratio, no way to tell where you really are per say now in comparison. SWG about 88% or 26,300 +/-.
Remember gcwr is a performance/warranty rating only. Question becomes, what performance are you looking at etc. Holding 60 in DOD vs OD vs Direct at 1800 rpm......pulling an X% grade with out stalling in 1st gear.
Marty


Yes it's a duramax with a 10 speed allison. According to their spec sheet it is an overall ratio of 3.42. I went from a 33" tire to a 35" tire and it dropped my ratio to 3.22. About a 6% loss. I did some regearing research and I'm not sure a 6% difference is worth it?

SWG about 88% or 26,300 - What is SWG?

n0arp

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Posted: 09/10/21 09:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ApexAZ wrote:

blt2ski wrote:

Simple method to figure out you lower rating is old diam tire/new diam tire times rear ratio. (32/35)3.73 = 3.41 effective axel ratio.
If you were stock at 31", then you are down to a 3.3 effective ratio.
I'm assuming you have a DMAX with that high of a GCWR. Being as 3.73 is the only ratio, no way to tell where you really are per say now in comparison. SWG about 88% or 26,300 +/-.
Remember gcwr is a performance/warranty rating only. Question becomes, what performance are you looking at etc. Holding 60 in DOD vs OD vs Direct at 1800 rpm......pulling an X% grade with out stalling in 1st gear.
Marty


Yes it's a duramax with a 10 speed allison. According to their spec sheet it's actually 3.42. I went from a 33" tire to a 35" tire and it dropped my ratio to 3.22. About a 6% loss. I did some regearing research and I'm not sure a 6% difference is worth it?

SWG about 88% or 26,300 - What is SWG?


I think that trailer is light enough that if I were happy with the performance, I wouldn't bother.

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