RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Truck Campers: Hmm... another use for Tork-Lift?

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Hmm... another use for Tork-Lift?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
JRscooby

Indepmo

Senior Member

Joined: 06/10/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/15/21 04:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Geo*Boy wrote:


Are you kidding, that truck gets into an accident and those rebar become flying projectiles. Yeah, your right whats the real danger?[emoticon]



While this statement is true, IMHO, it is made by somebody that does not pay a lot of attention to the way things are normally done. Sure, pickup hits something, that rebar keeps moving. But it will be hitting the ground probably before the back is clear of front rack. Most likely any damage done will be to tires or feet/ankles. Not Good.
Now let's look at the same impact, same bundle of bar, loaded in the normal manner, a rack over bed and cab. The bar is launched at at the same speed, but starting at over 6 feet in the air. With the same drop rate it can skip off the roof of the car the truck hit, off the deck lid of the car stopped in front, and into that car's passenger compartment. But it must go much farther before it hits anybody in the ankles. I think even worse.


NRALIFR wrote:

Looks like it needs a “Wide Load” sign to me.

[emoticon][emoticon]


Not unless eight and half feet.

NRALIFR

Truck Camping Out West

Senior Member

Joined: 11/27/2005

View Profile



Posted: 09/15/21 06:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:

NRALIFR wrote:

Looks like it needs a “Wide Load” sign to me.

[emoticon][emoticon]


Not unless eight and half feet.


It’s at least that.

The trucks bumper is 6’ wide, and my calibrated eyeballs say that’s more than 15” to the end of the extensions. Looks more like 18”, but just for reference license plates are all 12” wide. Compare that to what’s sticking out past the ends of the bumper.

Maybe he knows the width limit, and it’s 1/4” under. [emoticon]

[emoticon][emoticon]


2001 Lance 1121 on a 2016 F450 ‘Scuse me while I whinge.
And for all you Scooby-Doo and Yosemite Sam types………..Let’s Go Brandon!!!


jimh425

Western MT

Senior Member

Joined: 06/11/2006

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 09/15/21 06:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree it’s probably too wide. But, hey, I don’t think they are following any normal standards, so it’s ok, right? [emoticon]


'10 Ford F-450, 6.4, 4.30, 4x4, 14,500 GVWR, '06 Host Rainer 950 Dbl Slide, Torklift Talon tiedowns, Glow Steps, and Fastguns. Bilstein 4600s, Firestone Air Bags, Toyo M655 225/19.5 Gs, Curt front hitch, Energy Suspension bump stops.


JRscooby

Indepmo

Senior Member

Joined: 06/10/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/15/21 06:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NRALIFR wrote:

JRscooby wrote:

NRALIFR wrote:

Looks like it needs a “Wide Load” sign to me.

[emoticon][emoticon]


Not unless eight and half feet.


It’s at least that.

The trucks bumper is 6’ wide, and my calibrated eyeballs say that’s more than 15” to the end of the extensions. Looks more like 18”, but just for reference license plates are all 12” wide. Compare that to what’s sticking out past the ends of the bumper.

Maybe he knows the width limit, and it’s 1/4” under. [emoticon]

[emoticon][emoticon]


Well no state would issue a permit for that load. And my experience has taught me that few LEOs will notice somebody is a little over without a sign. Sign would cause more problems than solves.

Going off in weeds for a little humor. A company in KC, who's main job is cranes. All their tractors have blanket permits, so a load up to 10 feet wide does not require special calls to state. Some of the booms, they had issues with the cribbing failing because needed to stick out past the side of trailer so far. Management had the shop build some trailers 10 foot wide, to reduce this problem. As long as there is a load over 8.5 feet wide on the trailer, works great. But normally when the big cranes go out, the trucks make a few trips with boom sections. A MT trailer on the ground is not a load. But 2 of them stacked on a 102 can cross the scales.

Geo*Boy

Unknown

Senior Member

Joined: 04/27/2020

View Profile






Posted: 09/15/21 07:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:

Geo*Boy wrote:


Are you kidding, that truck gets into an accident and those rebar become flying projectiles. Yeah, your right whats the real danger?[emoticon]



While this statement is true, IMHO, it is made by somebody that does not pay a lot of attention to the way things are normally done. Sure, pickup hits something, that rebar keeps moving. But it will be hitting the ground probably before the back is clear of front rack. Most likely any damage done will be to tires or feet/ankles. Not Good.
Now let's look at the same impact, same bundle of bar, loaded in the normal manner, a rack over bed and cab. The bar is launched at at the same speed, but starting at over 6 feet in the air. With the same drop rate it can skip off the roof of the car the truck hit, off the deck lid of the car stopped in front, and into that car's passenger compartment. But it must go much farther before it hits anybody in the ankles. I think even worse.


NRALIFR wrote:

Looks like it needs a “Wide Load” sign to me.

[emoticon][emoticon]


Not unless eight and half feet.

I worked for a rebar fabricator and hauled quite a few loads of rebar. I know how to secure various sizes of rebar and I would have been fired, and rightfully so, if I hauled rebar like that. It’s flat out dangerous.

stevenal

Newport, OR, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 03/16/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/15/21 08:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Even if he's within width requirements, the driver cannot see where the extensions are. Note that he is not within his lane.


'18 Bigfoot 1500
Torklifts and Fastguns
'17 F350 Powerstroke Supercab SRW LB 4X4

JRscooby

Indepmo

Senior Member

Joined: 06/10/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/15/21 08:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Geo*Boy wrote:


I worked for a rebar fabricator and hauled quite a few loads of rebar. I know how to secure various sizes of rebar and I would have been fired, and rightfully so, if I hauled rebar like that. It’s flat out dangerous.


Yes, this should not be the way to haul rebar. And when my skateboard had a headboard mounted to the front of it. Most pros pulling a flatbed have their protection mounted tractor frame behind cab instead. This means in a sudden stop, if the load shifts it has at least 5 feet to be moving faster than the driver when it hits the rack.
I'm not saying this is a good/safe way to haul. What I'm saying is if you are going to be upset about this unusual method, you maybe should take issue with the tons of bar and pipe that moves out to small jobs on roof racks and such. Better that load does not get loose, but if it does the launch from low like that is much less likely to do real harm.

Kayteg1

California > Nevada

Senior Member

Joined: 06/18/2015

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/15/21 09:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Not surprising any subject brings lot of speculation.
"Wide load" signs are not legal in lot of states, so generally the "oversize load" should apply here.
When the racks sticks about 1 foot past bumper, making it about 9 ft wide, it is about the width of side mirrors, so maybe the law of small brackets sticking past 102" legal width apply?
That load sure calls for center support, flags and holding chains, but seeing the truck on center lane, doesn't look like driver is concern.





JRscooby

Indepmo

Senior Member

Joined: 06/10/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/15/21 10:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kayteg1 wrote:

Not surprising any subject brings lot of speculation.
"Wide load" signs are not legal in lot of states, so generally the "oversize load" should apply here.
When the racks sticks about 1 foot past bumper, making it about 9 ft wide, it is about the width of side mirrors, so maybe the law of small brackets sticking past 102" legal width apply?
That load sure calls for center support, flags and holding chains, but seeing the truck on center lane, doesn't look like driver is concern.


Brackets stick out about a foot on one side makes it 9 feet wide? Side mirrors in normal position are less than 102. And if less than 102, the width is no reason for flags and signs.

Kayteg1

California > Nevada

Senior Member

Joined: 06/18/2015

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/15/21 01:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This is SRW F350, so I have no experience, but my dually had side mirrors at above 9 ft wide before extending.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Hmm... another use for Tork-Lift?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.