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 > cleaning 7-pin receiver connector on truck

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schlep1967

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Posted: 09/16/21 05:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dedmiston wrote:

Found this in an old old thread.

Quote:

I'm out of WD-40, so I tried some of this stuff on both ends. It worked like a champ. Thanks for the suggestion!

Really MODERATOR? A link to KY Jelly? Maybe you should rethink being a moderator.


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MFL

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Posted: 09/16/21 09:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

schlep1967 wrote:

dedmiston wrote:

Found this in an old old thread.

Quote:

I'm out of WD-40, so I tried some of this stuff on both ends. It worked like a champ. Thanks for the suggestion!

Really MODERATOR? A link to KY Jelly? Maybe you should rethink being a moderator.


OK...while some of us act like children at times, I've never noticed any tender age members posting. Myself, I rather enjoyed Dave's post, and understand the humor he intended. OTOH, if I had posted this humorous comparison, to making a GOOD CONNECTION, would he have deleted my post?? IDK, but humor, in trying times, is normally a good thing.

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agesilaus

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Posted: 09/16/21 10:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

Really MODERATOR? A link to KY Jelly? Maybe you should rethink being a moderator.


A bit extreme isn't that? And maybe it works.


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dedmiston

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Posted: 09/16/21 12:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

[image]


I'll wager that a fair number of you remember this the next time you spray anything on your plug. It's a 10+ year old gag that still makes me chuckle.

Apologies to any sensitive feathers that were ruffled.


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dedmiston

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Posted: 09/16/21 12:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

agesilaus wrote:

And maybe it works.


I doubt it, but it's water soluble, so it should be harmless.

Thermoguy

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Posted: 09/16/21 01:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Omrod wrote:

Thanks for the replies. What happens is . . . I'm traveling down the road, pulling my camper I and get: ding, ding, ding and a message saying "Trailer Connected". I dismiss the message and a little while later it does it again. It gets annoying after a while. My battery is fine no corrosion there and it doesn't look real corroded inside the plug. I was hoping there was "magic" spray with baking soda or something.


I'm guessing you have a GM Truck of some sort... I have seen that message.

I have tried unplugging and plugging back in. Sometimes works for the rest of the trip. Dielectric grease has been the best fix, but not always. I have also had to have the steering stabilizer sensor changed out twice now. That was the most recent fix. Nothing else worked and it is a real PIA... Also, when that happens, you lose your trailer brakes, so drive carefully.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 09/16/21 02:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thermoguy wrote:


Dielectric grease has been the best fix, but not always.


NO, wrong application for dielectric grease.

Dielectric grease is a Silicone grease made of liquid Silicon and a thickener.

Silicon IS a NON-CONDUCTIVE ELECTRICAL INSULATOR..

See HERE

Highlights from website link..

"Dielectric grease assists in preventing arcing between electrical parts.

Dielectric grease is also known as tune-up grease. It is a silicone-based and non-conductive type of grease to protect electrical connectors from corrosion, moisture, and dirt.

It disrupts electric currents’ flow, thus making it ideal for sealing and lubricating rubber parts of electric connectors.

Ensure that the grease does not touch the path of electrical currents or where parts are connecting. This is because the grease is an insulator, and it disrupts the flow of currents. Therefore, it is recommended to use dielectric grease on surfaces of electrical parts where the currents are not passing.

When using dielectric grease for an automotive tune-up on a diesel or gasoline engine, start by applying a little grease at the end of a spark plug wire’s rubber boot and spread it only to cover the inside lip. This prevents high voltage electricity from flowing to the boot and leaking from the engine block. It also makes it less difficult to put the boot over the ceramic insulator. It creates a watertight seal around the spark plug, protecting the connection from dirt and water.

The other great use of dielectric grease is on gaskets of multi-pin connectors or rubber mating surfaces in the truck and automotive engines. In this application, it acts as a sealant and lubricant of the connector’s non-conductive mating surfaces. However, it is not advisable to use the grease on the connector’s actual electrical conductive contacts.

Cons of Dielectric Grease

Although dielectric grease is beneficial, it can also be detrimental when applied incorrectly. The grease is non-conductive; thus, when used incorrectly, it can prevent current flow. If you fail to clean the conductor’s contact points after applying the dielectric grease, the current will not pass through.

"


There is special grease made specifically for electrical contacts, it is sold as OxGard or No-Alox which are designed to prevent corrosion from moisture. Those types of grease you only apply to the contact surfaces as it does allow for electrical conduction but seals moisture which causes corrosion of the contacts away from the contact surfaces. These greases were developed to help allow Aluminum to copper wiring interfaces to coexist..

BUT, to make this work properly, the contacts surfaces must be 100% corrosion free which means you must use some elbow grease, muscle and sandpaper to shine the contact surfaces clean of any corrosion.

JRscooby

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Posted: 09/16/21 03:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

Thermoguy wrote:


Dielectric grease has been the best fix, but not always.


NO, wrong application for dielectric grease.

Dielectric grease is a Silicone grease made of liquid Silicon and a thickener.

Silicon IS a NON-CONDUCTIVE ELECTRICAL INSULATOR..

See HERE

Highlights from website link..

"Dielectric grease assists in preventing arcing between electrical parts.

Dielectric grease is also known as tune-up grease. It is a silicone-based and non-conductive type of grease to protect electrical connectors from corrosion, moisture, and dirt.

It disrupts electric currents’ flow, thus making it ideal for sealing and lubricating rubber parts of electric connectors.

Ensure that the grease does not touch the path of electrical currents or where parts are connecting. This is because the grease is an insulator, and it disrupts the flow of currents. Therefore, it is recommended to use dielectric grease on surfaces of electrical parts where the currents are not passing.

When using dielectric grease for an automotive tune-up on a diesel or gasoline engine, start by applying a little grease at the end of a spark plug wire’s rubber boot and spread it only to cover the inside lip. This prevents high voltage electricity from flowing to the boot and leaking from the engine block. It also makes it less difficult to put the boot over the ceramic insulator. It creates a watertight seal around the spark plug, protecting the connection from dirt and water.

The other great use of dielectric grease is on gaskets of multi-pin connectors or rubber mating surfaces in the truck and automotive engines. In this application, it acts as a sealant and lubricant of the connector’s non-conductive mating surfaces. However, it is not advisable to use the grease on the connector’s actual electrical conductive contacts.

Cons of Dielectric Grease

Although dielectric grease is beneficial, it can also be detrimental when applied incorrectly. The grease is non-conductive; thus, when used incorrectly, it can prevent current flow. If you fail to clean the conductor’s contact points after applying the dielectric grease, the current will not pass through.

"


There is special grease made specifically for electrical contacts, it is sold as OxGard or No-Alox which are designed to prevent corrosion from moisture. Those types of grease you only apply to the contact surfaces as it does allow for electrical conduction but seals moisture which causes corrosion of the contacts away from the contact surfaces. These greases were developed to help allow Aluminum to copper wiring interfaces to coexist..

BUT, to make this work properly, the contacts surfaces must be 100% corrosion free which means you must use some elbow grease, muscle and sandpaper to shine the contact surfaces clean of any corrosion.


I'm not much smarter than a box of rocks, but have used Dielectric grease on hundreds of light cords for millions of miles for decades. And sense I started, the only issue I have had is careless handling. Start with tight, clean connections. A little of the grease about every 10-20 unhooks. I assume that like any grease, it will keep moisture, therefore corrosion off the contacts. And because it is non-conductive, I do not need to worry about it causing short circuits.

agesilaus

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Posted: 09/16/21 04:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hmmm...that is new info for me, I saw one of the electrical guru's advocating it's use on these connectors and just assumed (yes I know) that he knew what he was talking about. A tiny amount on the end of the truck end connector certainly abolished the lost connection messages for the next couple hookups.

dodge guy

Bartlett IL

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Posted: 09/16/21 04:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As cheap as the plug is, just buy a new one.
Also check to see if you have some debris in the trailer end. I had sand get in mine and it stopped any connection to the contacts (dropped it in the sand by accident).

Dielectric grease is to keep corrosion from happening, it does nothing after the fact.


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