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 > Tires - The 10 Year Rule

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mountainkowboy

Socal/NE Oregon

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Posted: 09/24/21 11:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

6 years is my timed out, they're hard as a rock by then and ride horrible.


Chuck & Ruth with 4-legged Molly
2007 Tiffin Allegro 30DA
2011 Ford Ranger
1987 HD FLHTP


Bruce Brown

Northern NY

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Posted: 09/25/21 06:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^^^ We went 9 years on our last set, but our MH is garage kept. The tires never see the sun unless we're using it, and there is a vapor barrier under the concrete it's parked on.


There are 24 hours in every day - it all depends on how you choose to use them.
Bruce & Jill Brown
2008 Kountry Star Pusher 3910


Desert Captain

Payson

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Posted: 09/25/21 09:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

KendallP wrote:

Desert Captain wrote:

"So your codes showed 5.5 years at the time of the incident? Or...? "

Yes, the three oldest were all 5.5 years old with 4/32" of tread and looked fine and all three were on the rear. I normally start shopping at five years but as noted, my bad, just lost track of how old they were getting. When I buy new tires I always have them put on the front and rotate the fronts to the rear. As noted in a subsequent post losing a rear is bad but a blowout on one of the fronts has a lot more potential for disaster.

[emoticon]

Roger that.

I didn't realize you had already been on a 5 year maximum plan. I thought you started that subsequent to your incident.

Seems like you're giving yourself a pretty good beating when most don't replace tires earlier than 6 or 7 years... and many go to 10... and some even longer.

If anything, a blowout at 5 1/2 years would make me question the tire quality much more than my change-out plan.




One salient fact that I inadvertently omitted was that I consistently put 8 to 9,000 miles a year on our coach. That means at 5 years I have 40,000+ miles on those tires and it is clearly time to start shopping for replacements. As noted above folks that don't use their rigs much, that spend most of their time sitting only exacerbate the potential for catastrophic tire failure {such as I experienced} due to the the low use tires "drying out"{for lack of a better description}.

I have always been a Michelin guy and while they are a bit more money tires are simply not where I want to be thrifty. My tires have always worn evenly and gotten me 40,000 mile {+/-} with a quality ride and handling. My coach has not been aligned since it left the factory in 2012,{that is the last stop on the Nexus production line} but now after 69K+ miles I am seeing a slight bit of outside edge wear on the front right. I'll be taking it in soon to have the alignment checked and adjusted as necessary.

IMHO: if you consistently get 40k miles out of a set of motorhome tires on a coach that is used on a regular basis you're doing more right than wrong. The original point being that RV tires are far more likely to time out than wear out regardless of they "look".

As always... Opinions and YMMV.

[emoticon]





KendallP

Probably the office

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Posted: 09/25/21 12:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

One salient fact that I inadvertently omitted was that I consistently put 8 to 9,000 miles a year on our coach. That means at 5 years I have 40,000+ miles on those tires and it is clearly time to start shopping for replacements. As noted above folks that don't use their rigs much, that spend most of their time sitting only exacerbate the potential for catastrophic tire failure {such as I experienced} due to the the low use tires "drying out"{for lack of a better description}.

Yeah, I gathered that since you had such little tread left. I definitely envy you for that kind of RV mileage. Hopefully I'll be able to do the same someday.

And now you bring to mind another thought...

If tires spend most of their lives in a foggy place like Santa Cruz, will they dry out as quickly as those who spend their lives in Yuma?

It's an interesting thought, but I'm in agreement. I don't want my family to be the beta tester for such a theory.

It will be interesting to see what those 9+ year-old Toyos look like on the inside when they're replaced.


Cheers,
Kendall

1986 Winnebago Chieftain 22RC


dougrainer

Carrolton, Texas

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Posted: 09/25/21 12:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Years ago, a retired Tire Engineer from I believe Goodyear used to give Tire seminars at FMCA and Good Sam rally's. He used a Potato salad analogy to let people determine how good a tire looks versus its age or mileage(lack of mileage) I will Readers Digest the tale
1. Wife makes the Potato salad for a large Family gathering and puts it out that mid morning ON A WARM DAY.
2. Later that evening Wife tells Husband to put Salad in refer
3. Husband forgets
4. The next morning Husband walks out and sees the Potato salad and realizes he is in deep trouble with wife
5. He covers the Salad and puts it back in the refer and tells no one.
6. WOULD ANY NORMAL PERSON THEN EAT THE POTATO SALAD?????????
7. SAME with Tires that show no deterioation but are old and have very few miles

LandYacht35diesel

Florida STAYcation

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Posted: 10/11/21 04:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DOESNT the speed of what you cruise at AND PROPER air pressures determine much of this ?

And OTHER THINGS to consider is ... that all this is just a tire company GAME to sell more tires. AND WHY ... don’t tires last way WAY longer than the yesterYEAR ones did ?

CapriRacer

Somewhere in the US

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Posted: 10/12/21 05:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LandYacht35diesel wrote:

DOESNT the speed of what you cruise at AND PROPER air pressures determine much of this ?

And OTHER THINGS to consider is ... that all this is just a tire company GAME to sell more tires. AND WHY ... don’t tires last way WAY longer than the yesterYEAR ones did ?


Yes, there are a lot of variables when it comes to tire aging - operating speed and inflation pressure among them.

The one thing that has yet to be mentioned is locale. Heat, in the form of ambient temperature, plays a HUGE role in how long tires last. Obviously tires operating around Phoenix experience a lot more heat history that tires operating around Minneapolis. So if you live and/or operate in the desert SW, you need to use a more rapid replacement schedule than someone living/operating in the northern midwest.

And why don't today's tires last longer?

1) Law of Physics (and Chemistry) don't change over time.
2) They didn't, but we have the Internet today and that changes how people perceive things.
3) Then there is this odd thing that our brains do: We think the Good-Old-Days(TM) were better - somehow. Actual statistics don't bear this out.


********************************************************************

CapriRacer

Visit my web site: www.BarrysTireTech.com

wa8yxm

Davison Michigan (East of Flint)

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Posted: 10/12/21 05:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LandYacht35diesel wrote:

DOESNT the speed of what you cruise at AND PROPER air pressures determine much of this ?

"

under/over inflation reduces tire life.
Excess speed likewise
But none of this has anything to do with the age rules. which may be 10 or less (one state law is 8 years I'm told but have not verified)


Home was where I park it. but alas the.
2005 Damon Intruder 377 Alas declared a total loss
after a semi "nicked" it. Still have the radios
Kenwood TS-2000, ICOM ID-5100, ID-51A+2, ID-880 REF030C most times


Desert Captain

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Posted: 10/12/21 10:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"The one thing that has yet to be mentioned is locale. Heat, in the form of ambient temperature, plays a HUGE role in how long tires last. Obviously tires operating around Phoenix experience a lot more heat history that tires operating around Minneapolis. So if you live and/or operate in the desert SW, you need to use a more rapid replacement schedule than someone living/operating in the northern midwest."

Actually I brought this up back on the second page of this discussion, just sayin...

"Admittedly Arizona is a tough environment on all tires but these had been meticulously maintained and always run at the correct psi for the loads they carried. Obviously opinions vary but IMHO if your tires are over 5 years old you are rolling the dice... place your bets."

Clearly we agree. I have spent long days driving in 112 - 115 degrees and cannot even imagine just how hot the road surface actually is. Conversely as winter appears ready to pounce early this year freezing temperatures, snow and ice are all too common throughout most of Arizona {the average elevation of Arizona is north of 4,000' and we have lots of 9,000'+ passes to negotiate}.

The truth is in the real world there is no arbitrary ten, seven or even five year rule per se. One must always take into consideration not only how but where your tires are being used and then decide, as in "Do ya feel lucky punk? Well ,do ya???" [emoticon]

Here is a shot of us in the "Dead Zone" 30 miles west of Phoenix on I-10:

[image]

[image]


[emoticon]

* This post was edited 10/12/21 10:37am by Desert Captain *

KendallP

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Posted: 10/12/21 11:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CapriRacer wrote:

The one thing that has yet to be mentioned is locale. Heat, in the form of ambient temperature, plays a HUGE role in how long tires last. Obviously tires operating around Phoenix experience a lot more heat history that tires operating around Minneapolis. So if you live and/or operate in the desert SW, you need to use a more rapid replacement schedule than someone living/operating in the northern midwest.

And why don't today's tires last longer?

1) Law of Physics (and Chemistry) don't change over time.
2) They didn't, but we have the Internet today and that changes how people perceive things.
3) Then there is this odd thing that our brains do: We think the Good-Old-Days(TM) were better - somehow. Actual statistics don't bear this out.

I think he meant that tire technology has improved and tires last longer than they did in those days of yore.

Also... this from the OP...

"Babied and covered most of their lives, in beautiful (where visible) condition with no checks

Entire lives in Santa Cruz with a very mild climate. Last couple of years undriven and parked without the jacks down and uncovered with driver's side facing south (the sun... and Central California coastal fog)"

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