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Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > delamination issue on side of TT, need suggestions

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Caryite

the Triangle

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Posted: 10/14/21 08:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm attaching an image below of some minor water intrusion from both the outside electric outlet (minimal) and from the back of the refrigerator from where a screw was likely not caulked as well as it should have been by the original manufacturer (more pronounced). Given the back of the fridge is mostly covered with the vent, that lack of caulking wasn't something I've been inspecting like the other exterior seams of my camper.

[image]

I plan to address both areas with one of these epoxy resins:
1) Bondo Fiberglass Resin, Interior and Exterior Home Use, 100% Waterproof, Strong, Durable, 28.8 fl oz. I have this product already from a prior fiberglass repair needed. Ready to mix and use. Sets in 12 minutes, and cure time is 2 hours.
2) J-B Weld 50165 Original 25ml Resealable Syringe. After mixing the two part formula with the included mixing tray and stir stick, J-B Weld takes 4-6 hours to set and 15 hours to cure.
3) Gorilla 2 Part Epoxy, 5 Minute Set, .85 Ounce Syringe, Clear. 30 minute cure.

The West Marine/WEST SYSTEM 105 Epoxy Resin (1 qt) w/207 Special Clear Epoxy Hardener (.66 pt) + Mini Epoxy Metering Pump Set appears to be more than what I would need for this area, so although highly rated, I'm looking for a smaller amount needed and a lower cost here for this area that is no more than 10 inches by 7 inches at most.

On all of these bonding options, I'm planning to inject with a syringe and using boards against a structure to secure it for 24 hours right after adding the resin/epoxy in.

I'll be able to access the area below the outlet as is seen in the picture, but the area under the refrigerator back that leaked appears to be tougher to access. Taking that section out with lots of caulk appears to be more trouble than it is worth. I suppose I could always drill a small hole for the syringe where the final caulk will be, but I'm not yet sure I want to do that either. But getting the epoxy resin in may leave me little options here to get it flattened out.

Anyone who has done this before have any suggestions? I've looked at many of the online videos of others who have done this, but they appear to be much larger areas and scale, and I'm curious what some have used for their bonding material and have done for injecting into a small area like this.

Thanks for all suggestions.

* This post was edited 10/15/21 07:02am by Caryite *

NamMedevac 70

Reno

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Posted: 10/15/21 08:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Some deleted my comment so I will try this again. If your methods do not work then try using white eternal bond tape to cover the small area as I successfully did on a 12 inch cut in sidewall next to lower metal frame from road debris. Covered the hole nicely and no water leaks from wet payment. Tape comes in various widths and pliable and easy to use and last long time and blended in well with my white TT like yours. If desired you can spray paint over it. Tape is made for RV use. Good luck.

Caryite

the Triangle

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Posted: 10/15/21 11:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NamMedevac 70 wrote:

Some deleted my comment so I will try this again. If your methods do not work then try using white eternal bond tape to cover the small area as I successfully did on a 12 inch cut in sidewall next to lower metal frame from road debris. Covered the hole nicely and no water leaks from wet payment. Tape comes in various widths and pliable and easy to use and last long time and blended in well with my white TT like yours. If desired you can spray paint over it. Tape is made for RV use. Good luck.


I did see your 2nd post like this that wasn't blank and I do have plenty of Eternabond tape for the roof of my camper that I have already used.

However, the issue here is addressing the delamination and the bulge out from that has already happened. I don't see how covering that with Eternabond is going to remove that.

Also, if I did just cut away the fiberglass that has delaminated, then I would likely just choose to use the Bondo resin with the fiberglass mesh material I already have to rebuild the fiberglass in that area vs. choosing to use Eternabond to cover it.

At this time, I feel it is easier and more direct to just get the resin epoxy materials into those areas between the fiberglass and the wood with as little effort. Hopefully that will help remove the delamination bulge after the 24 hour cure period with sufficient pressure.

If that doesn't work, then at that point I might consider using the Bondo materials I currently have as I've already once did to address a small dent/hole by a back storage area when it was nicked to rebuild the fiberglass siding, sand it down, and then repaint.

Thanks

* This post was edited 10/15/21 06:52pm by Caryite *

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 10/15/21 05:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Does the delam push in easy? If so there’s a good chance what your doing will glue it back in place.
If it’s difficult to push back flat then likely won’t work.
Either way, the repair is purely cosmetic. Stopping the leak you discovered is the important part.
Good luck!


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12th Man Fan

Flower Mound , Texas

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Posted: 10/15/21 08:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't believe that will lay down flat using the method you are suggesting. I certainly am not an expert but I believe that skin has expanded some and will not lay flat unless you take some material out.

I think I would take a straight edge and cut straight down the bulge then lay it down flat and cut again where the edges join. Then put the glue in and clamp it down.

There will be a fine line there where you made the cut but it can be filled with many different fillers.

Just an idea. Hope you get it worked out.


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Caryite

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Posted: 10/16/21 06:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

Does the delam push in easy? If so there’s a good chance what your doing will glue it back in place.
If it’s difficult to push back flat then likely won’t work.
Either way, the repair is purely cosmetic. Stopping the leak you discovered is the important part.
Good luck!


Yes, the delam does push in easy. I've measured and I'm pretty confident a 12x10 3/4" plywood with enough pressure from the side of my house next to this set for 24 hours *should* keep it in, *if* I use the right resin epoxy adhesive.

I'm hoping to do the work this weekend. Currently leaning towards the Bondo, and don't think it will take too much to get it done. I have a syringe and getting a tube to hopefully access the larger side area to inject there.

If I need a hole to inject there, I plan to drill at the top along the caulk line to later fill that in.

Per the other post below this, I'm not yet set on cutting the fiberglass after seeing many others repair theirs without cutting on Youtube.

Thanks all, will report progress on this...

Brandon the Traveler

SC, NY, PA, WV

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Posted: 10/16/21 06:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Are you sure the water infiltration is not from in the wheelwell and wicking up through the lamination, or possibly a combination of that and from the fridge vent area? One thing is consistent on these things and that is the shitty construction. I have not seen any that did not have some type of unsealed gap in the wheelwell somewhere. Usually you'll even find exposed plywood edges in the wheelwell which is the substrate layers of the wall panel lamination. Spray on undercoating is a good idea in the wheelwells.


I went.

Caryite

the Triangle

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Posted: 10/16/21 07:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Brandon the Traveler wrote:

Are you sure the water infiltration is not from in the wheelwell and wicking up through the lamination, or possibly a combination of that and from the fridge vent area? One thing is consistent on these things and that is the shitty construction. I have not seen any that did not have some type of unsealed gap in the wheelwell somewhere. Usually you'll even find exposed plywood edges in the wheelwell which is the substrate layers of the wall panel lamination. Spray on undercoating is a good idea in the wheelwells.


Good point of consideration, and I will check underneath further today. I haven't taken many/any recent trips in the rain, and just before I saw the delam in the past week, we had a major storm of 3-4+ inches of rain, much of it hitting that side of the camper. I double checked the exterior caulk around the outside rear fridge area, and that was fine, but the bottom right screw appears to not be as well caulked as the left one was in the picture, so I plan to reinforce that and recaulk the whole area again with Dicor.

The outlet itself is screwed into the styrofoam, so that alone too needs some extra TLC and caulking to reinforce that in too after I am done with hopefully flattening this fiberglass out with the rebonding.

I will still check underneath, but I really am suspecting that internal screw behind the rear fridge grate area where the grate cover is removed to see that item in the original picture above.

* This post was edited 10/16/21 08:39am by Caryite *

Caryite

the Triangle

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Posted: 10/16/21 05:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Caryite wrote:


I plan to address both areas with one of these epoxy resins:
1) Bondo Fiberglass Resin, Interior and Exterior Home Use, 100% Waterproof, Strong, Durable, 28.8 fl oz. I have this product already from a prior fiberglass repair needed. Ready to mix and use. Sets in 12 minutes, and cure time is 2 hours.
2) J-B Weld 50165 Original 25ml Resealable Syringe. After mixing the two part formula with the included mixing tray and stir stick, J-B Weld takes 4-6 hours to set and 15 hours to cure.
3) Gorilla 2 Part Epoxy, 5 Minute Set, .85 Ounce Syringe, Clear. 30 minute cure.

The West Marine/WEST SYSTEM 105 Epoxy Resin (1 qt) w/207 Special Clear Epoxy Hardener (.66 pt) + Mini Epoxy Metering Pump Set appears to be more than what I would need for this area, so although highly rated, I'm looking for a smaller amount needed and a lower cost here for this area that is no more than 10 inches by 7 inches at most.


Update on the epoxy resin, I'm getting the TotalBoat 5:1 Epoxy Resin Kits, Marine G........rglass and Wood Boat Building and Repair at Amazon after doing more research.

1) The Bondo resin is a polyester resin, not epoxy resin, so I'm not convinced it will hold for the long term after reading more about each material type.

2) The JB Weld epoxy resin comes in 25ml syringes, and I don't want to short-change how much I'll need. I was thinking I'd need 3 containers of that, and after buying that, it's nearly 40% the cost of the TotalBoat solution. Fingers crossed on the epoxy resin, and more to come...

I checked underneath of the tire areas of the underbelly, and didn't really see where that was going to be causing the water intrusion either, on that side of the camper.

* This post was edited 10/16/21 05:15pm by Caryite *

Gjac

Milford, CT

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Posted: 10/18/21 08:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sounds like you have a good plan, the only thing I would add is if you use epoxy resin make sure the area is dry first. Acetone will help the drying process. It is a solvent and will flash off quickly removing the moisture. The second think I would add is when I did mine and it was a much larger area than yours, I used several car jacks and plywood caul plates to apply pressure against the side of a brick building. The spring suspension ont the MH was not enough to react the pressure from the car jacks. In retrospect it would have been more stable if the hydraulic jacks were down. Do you know what the substrate is under the delamination? If it is luan and dry rather than particle board and you can push it in with your fingers you should be fine. If you think moisture is still there polyurethane glue will react with moisture and still bond well where as epoxy won't. Good Luck on your project.

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