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bgum

South Louisiana

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Posted: 11/12/21 02:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Knowing and being able to change a tire are great.
Knowing but being physically unable to is a problem.

JRscooby

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Posted: 11/12/21 02:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ktmrfs wrote:

Talking about "spare tires" Many new cars do NOT have even a donut spare, only an inflator kit with slime.


If that was the case for these guys their only option would be call for a tow. That hook, if you had the equipment to cut it flush might hold enough air in to leave a slow leak. Pull it out? Hole to big for slime.


rlw999 wrote:

On the other hand, flats are much less common than they used to be. When I first started driving, I used to get a flat tire every few years. It's been over 20 years since I had a flat tire that left me stranded (and that time, it was both tires on one side, so the spare didn't help me). I've had slow leaks/punctures since then, but have always been able to pump up the tire and get to a tire store.

I've got the tools to replace a flat in my Class C, but unless I was stuck somewhere outside of cell range, I'd call roadside service if I got a flat.


Yes, back in the days of bias-ply tires. My first pickup had split rims, and maypops.


time2roll wrote:

My first tire change did not go perfect either. I give credit for the continued effort with eventual success. Plenty would walk away and call for assistance.


Not sure if they ever had success. And I'm sure I had trouble my first time. But back in that time, I, and everybody I knew did it before they had a drivers license. Now, not so much. Back in the day, we checked the oil every time we put gas in. Now we rarely think of it. (My 16 YO pickup or DWs 16 YO car have never had oil added between changes. Engines don't wear out in cars, but if nobody looks they can bleed to death.


When my nephew was about 13, I came up on him watching my Dad changing a tire. I took the tool from Dad's hand, asked the boy if he knew how to change a tire. While boy was stuttering Dad told me he could still change a tire. "Yes Dad, and if you where by yourself I would expect you to. But the boy can't learn any younger" The boy knew, but had never done it with hand tools.

ktmrfs

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Posted: 11/12/21 03:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"back in the day" the old "bumper jacks" were NOT the safest thing around either. More than once I'd seen or heard of cases where the car would roll forward/backward or side/side off the bumper jack. Lifting one end of the car off the ground with the bumper jack was not an invitation for any kind of stability.


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Cummins12V98

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Posted: 11/12/21 03:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MFL wrote:

Good PSA JR!

I do think, since everyone is carrying a phone now, many rely on their phone, rather than any maintenance skills. That being said, I am not one of those folks, and would change my own tire.

I buy new vehicles, but still check the spare myself right away, to ensure proper psi, and to understand/examine the supplied tools to change.

On my truck, like you mentioned, the lug wrench would require a superman! The lug torque is supposed to be at 160.

Jerry


I figure this is a good reason to keep her around!

[image]


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MFL

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Posted: 11/12/21 03:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hey Ron...was thinking of your wife, when you posted in Quartzsite thread, about being secure. I would not want to break into your RV, with either one of you on the other side! She is a capable lady!

Jerry





Cummins12V98

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Posted: 11/12/21 05:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MFL wrote:

Hey Ron...was thinking of your wife, when you posted in Quartzsite thread, about being secure. I would not want to break into your RV, with either one of you on the other side! She is a capable lady!

Jerry


YEP she has her own pc of metal, er uh polymer......

rjstractor

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Posted: 11/12/21 06:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

time2roll wrote:

My first tire change did not go perfect either. I give credit for the continued effort with eventual success. Plenty would walk away and call for assistance.


Nor did mine. I was riding with my sister at age 15 in a '76 Gran Torino and we got a flat on the freeway. By the time my dad arrived I had the tire changed, only to have him point out that I installed the lug nuts with the tapered side out. Still got an attaboy for putting in the work though. I still think about that every time I change a tire, and thankfully that's not often.

JRscooby

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Posted: 11/13/21 05:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ktmrfs wrote:

"back in the day" the old "bumper jacks" were NOT the safest thing around either. More than once I'd seen or heard of cases where the car would roll forward/backward or side/side off the bumper jack. Lifting one end of the car off the ground with the bumper jack was not an invitation for any kind of stability.


Yes, bumper jacks had there issues I can remember Dad getting the whole family out of the '58 Ford, lifting the rear of car as high as the jack would lift, then pushing sideways to get car out of ditch. "Boys, see how easy it can fall? Be careful when jacking"
One thing that scares me when people decide a bottle jack is better than factory; You get the car up, the flat off, discover need to go up another little bit. Bumper jack or bottle jack, (or even the factory screw jack) that last bit is when the car is most likely to fall. And most bottle jacks, at least 1 arm is under the car working the jack, and the wheel isn't there to limit the down travel.
Sense I started this thread, I have discovered it takes a lot of torque on the factory jack as it gets to top end of travel. Have decided I will cut some 2X6 blocks to ride on top of spare wheel. 2 or 3 to pull the flat up on, before mess with nuts or jack, then 1 or 2 under the jack. Use wood and the engine to do most of the lifting.

bucky

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Posted: 11/13/21 05:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MFL wrote:

Good PSA JR!

I do think, since everyone is carrying a phone now, many rely on their phone, rather than any maintenance skills. That being said, I am not one of those folks, and would change my own tire.

I buy new vehicles, but still check the spare myself right away, to ensure proper psi, and to understand/examine the supplied tools to change.

On my truck, like you mentioned, the lug wrench would require a superman! The lug torque is supposed to be at 160.

Jerry


What are you driving with that large of a torque rating on a lug nut?


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noteven

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Posted: 11/13/21 05:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My stupid Toyota has a manual in one of the glove boxes that details how to change a tire.

Well howdy! The manual for the F350 does too!

Is this a trend?

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