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Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > Are OTR truckers restricted from speeding?

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way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 11/15/21 11:17am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In a trip over the weekend, we spent a few hours on Sb 95 from NC, through SC, into GA. What I noticed was every single OTR truck doing the speed limit or less. While not faulting the trucks and I have much respect for drivers and no issue with them at all - this post is not an invitation to a flame fest. It's just a question. Was something recently imposed? I used to see trucks speeding or at a minimum keeping up with traffic.


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enblethen

Moses Lake, WA

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Posted: 11/15/21 11:27am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Have read some article about supply shortages and truckers want to throw out current regulations on hours they can drive. I see many independent truckers traveling at the truck speed limit. Company drivers have been following speed limits for some time.


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Thermoguy

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Posted: 11/15/21 11:31am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In the NW, trucks still speeding and camping in the left lane... Sucks trying to get around them in heavier traffic. (not hauling myself)

I know we have a supply issue, but I see more large trucks on the road then I can remember in the past.

ford truck guy

Pennsylvania

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Posted: 11/15/21 11:47am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Being a CDL class A holder, NOTHING has changed.... Other than you MAY be seeing the new crop of drivers out on the road...

A lot of the older drivers have retired or just stopped because of the rules and regulations... A lot dropped when the E.L.D. ( Electronic Logging Device ) rules went into place last year ( I believe) ..

We just hired 2 new Class A drivers, right out of driving school and they for sure drive the limit, or slower....


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Dutch_12078

Winters south, summers north

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Posted: 11/15/21 11:48am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Many OTR trucks built since 2000 have been required to be equipped with an ELD, Electronic Logging Device as of December, 2017. Electronic Logging Devices monitor drivers’ stats like speed, mileage, hours, driving habits, and location. Most companies and their insurance carriers generally don't look very kindly on too many over the speed limit flags on the logs. State/federal agencies do not have direct access to the ELD data, a common myth...


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OkieGene

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Posted: 11/15/21 11:58am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I spent 15 years in the trucking and transportation business.

Many companies have limits set on the rig. Speed limits may be regulated, and thus can't be exceeded, at any level the company desires. For example, many years ago, all the Schneider and JB Hunt trucks were limited to 55 mph.

They can also set the truck to not idle for longer than, oh lets say 10 minutes or whatever they want, to conserve fuel and emissions.

This is done not just to save money, but to help lower risk and liability. Everyone knows, or should know, that is a commercial truck, or you, are driving over the speed limit and have a wreck, you are exposed to much more penalty and liability, or the government and the lawyers will be lined up trying to get in on going after you.

Some companies will pay a driver bonus for meeting or exceeding a fuel mileage mark. Get better mileage, get a bigger pay check.

time2roll

Southern California

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Posted: 11/15/21 12:35pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The latest spike in fuel prices could have something to do with reduction of speed. More drivers could follow this example.


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JRscooby

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Posted: 11/15/21 01:31pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For years, part of my retirement plan was just park my old Pete, and only work enough to pay the insurance unless something was going on that raised demand for trucks short term. But when the regs said I would have to go to E-logs that idea went out the window. I don't think I ever slept 10 hours straight. And for years I have been of the mind I can't get where I'm going driving 10 hrs a day, load likely ain't worth hauling. But, if about 2-3 afternoon I see I will be hitting a metro in rush hour, I would stop, take a couple of hr nap, then drive thru supper time. Depending on how much time I spent waiting to load/unload that day, that nap might put me over the 14 before I park for night. (Pretty good at napping while waiting, but that don't count either) Running my looseleaf paper, just get to where I spend the night couple hrs ahead of clock, be ready to roll next morning. E logs, from the time the truck turns a wheel, 14 hours later, it tells on you.
Now my old Cat never got great mileage, but running 62 MPH, if limits allowed, was best for average speed/fuel burned/aggravation. If the load needed to get there in less time, better be more than average money on the table.
I heard years ago, if a truck was going to run in parts of Canada, law required speed to be limited. And when fuel costs spike, some fleets reset max on trucks.

wanderingbob

monticeeo, fla

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Posted: 11/15/21 02:05pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My trucks had a governor , would only go 64 MPH ! I never got a speeding ticket ! What was aggravating was to be behind some one going 63 MPH , we could never get up enough speed to pass !

ford truck guy

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Posted: 11/15/21 02:43pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wanderingbob wrote:

My trucks had a governor , would only go 64 MPH ! I never got a speeding ticket ! What was aggravating was to be behind some one going 63 MPH , we could never get up enough speed to pass !


AT 1 point I had a lease Freight Shaker from Ryder Truck ( back in the day ) .. got friendly with the shop manager, it cost me a case of beer to get that thing turned UP.... Now its all computerized and cannot be turned up unless corporate gives the OK.....

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