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Open Roads Forum  >  RV Pet Stop  >  Dogs

 > Tully-Behavior Issues

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Crowe

Merrimack, NH

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Posted: 01/28/22 06:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Tully has been fully housebroken at 5 months. He's been having accidents in the house as of late. He is intact and we're pretty sure the small amounts of urine (he never fully empties his bladder) are territorial but are not sure on his poops. He does not have accidents overnight (8-10 hours) nor does he have accidents when we leave him in his pen if we go out even the rare times it's for an extended period. He can be outside for a while but then come in and poop. I've read that it's rare but sometimes dogs will poop to mark territory. His behavior has also bordered unruly at times lately. It's not a lack of training-he's already completed AKC Puppy Star training and basic obedience. We are currently enrolled in AKC Canine Good Citizen training and we may have to drop it because he can be so out of control. A martingale collar has helped but his focus is non-existent. The trainer thinks it's most likely his age. The house accidents concern me more than the nutty behavior because I can eventually fix that. Thoughts?


I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be Douglas Adams

RV-less for now but our spirits are still on the open road.

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 01/28/22 06:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Obnoxious teenage behaviors?

My Nell went through about 6months of being a total a$$ working sheep after being fully trained. She aged out of these behaviors without much additional training.

Crowe

Merrimack, NH

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Posted: 01/28/22 07:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Obnoxious teenage behaviors?

LOL-ayup! Not listening, sassing, biting (not vicious), getting in our other dog's face, etc.

Deb and Ed M

SW MI & Space Coast, FL USA

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Posted: 01/29/22 11:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm not going to be much help other than to say "hang in there". I'm FINALLY on the other side of Augie's adolescence and he could be a real, um..."Ausshole". The animal who could jump 6' into the air while lunging to play with a passing dog, will now simply sit quietly with just a whispered word. It's not that *I* did anything differently - he just needed to mature between the ears (and I didn't have problems with pottying in the house)

My daughter's (neutered) Shih-Tzu was a notorious "marker", so when they needed to move in with us shortly after our new carpet had been installed - I said OK only as long as he wore a belly-band diaper while indoors. Worked great! I also had put them on my Jimmy, who was elderly, diabetic, and would occasionally "leak" in his sleep. Amazon sells them - the ones we had were soft and washable

winnietrey

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Posted: 01/29/22 01:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Our Oscar is an 80lbs lab mix, 18 months old and strong as a bull moose.

I think our trainer would say "he thinks he owns you" and is trying to be the alpha dog. Sounds like you are in active training, with someone that knows a lot more than me.

But couple of things that have worked well for us.

When he is unruly leash him up to an inside doorknob. That way he is still part of the family but is confined and gives him a chance to calm down. Works very well for us.

And second Oscar could care less about a martingale collar. But he does care about a prong collar. It gets his attention, which is what you want, and lets him know we are going where I want, not where you want.

I know they are controversial, but it changed his leash pulling behavior in about 5 minutes. And maybe wishful thinking on our part but he seems to be a better dog all around. I do not jerk it or yank it, just a twist of the wrist, to exert a little pressure. Might be worth a shot.

I would be interested to hear Dr Doug's take on a prong collar

Crowe

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Posted: 01/29/22 02:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

But he does care about a prong collar.

He walks awesome with a prong collar but he can't wear it for his Good Citizen test so that's why we are trying the martingale. He's worlds better with that than on a regular collar but not quite as good as a prong collar. When he gets out of control in the house we use the "settle" command with varying degrees of success-then it's a time out in his pen. It's just his sass attitude that we can do without!

Deb and Ed M

SW MI & Space Coast, FL USA

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Posted: 01/29/22 06:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Re: prong collars - yes, that collar enabled me to hang onto the leash (arthritis) during Augie's antics. He too doesn't like to pull very hard against it; and IMO, he got so used to not pulling, that he simply doesn't bother, even with his "regular" collar. BUT: spend the money and buy a GOOD "Herm Sprenger" collar. The cheap ones have "square-cut ends" and the Sprengers have round, smooth ends. Surely they are more comfortable for the dog to wear?

dturm

Lake County, IN

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Posted: 01/30/22 04:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'll start this with the disclaimer that behavior is not my strongest area of vet medicine. I've had most of my personal experience with Golden Retrievers a breed so easy to train that it's hard to screw them up. After spending hours every day dealing with difficult behavior (almost always understandable as the things we do are often uncomfortable or strange), the last thing I want is to come home to more difficult behavioral situations.

Most animal behaviorists do not recommend pronged collars. Many trainers do. I don't think there is a universal situation (always OK vs never OK)- each individual situation is different. The behaviorists maintain that pronged collars are used by owners as an easy out rather than dealing with the bad behavior.

There are tons of new training aids as far as collars, harnesses, head collars, and training protocols. Many current behaviorists also discount the "alpha" dog theory that we all grew up with.

Bottom line is that dealing with an adolescent dog can be difficult. You have to be willing to try different things and even change things up when what has been working no longer does. Far too often people just tire and give up and that produces an adult dog with poor behavior. We've all seen them, those that bark uncontrollably, lunge while walking, are aggressive to people or other animals and any number of other undesirable behaviors.

One universal theory is that a tired dog (both physical and mental) is a good dog. Uniform, regular daily training on a schedule (feeding, elimination, play, exercise and training) seems to have benefits. Don't ignore the mental stimulation as a bored dog will misbehave.

The fact that you are seeking suggestions means that you are actively dealing with the situation. Keep the faith and keep trying different things. They do grow up.


Doug & Sandy
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BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 01/30/22 05:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Another thing to keep in mind when dealing with an unruly adolescent dog is at some point they will mature and the necessary corrections for when they are mentally immature may become too much once they mature.

Crowe

Merrimack, NH

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Posted: 01/30/22 06:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Part of the problem is keeping up with the exercise he needs. The bulk of our backyard is now fenced so he can run a lot more. He does get walked 2 times/day most days, I play ball with him in the yard, and my husband is his playmate inside. Biggest issue lately is weather-below zero temps plus wind chills make it a lot uncomfortable for his hoomans to be outside plus it can be dangerous for him. He needs a buddy but we still have old man Jake and I don't think I can handle 3 dogs. The training center has doggie day care but since he's 8 months old and intact, they won't take him. Our vet has daycare and will take him as long as he behaves appropriately. He's definitely a beta dog so that helps. Guess we just have to tough it out-and probably retake the Canine Good Citizen class when he matures. I am also meeting with the vet to talk about getting him neutered.

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