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 > 1st time long distance trip need advice

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FLHTCI

east coast

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Posted: 01/31/22 03:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We bought our motor home last fall, we took one short trip with nothing in tow. We are now planning to drive 1500 miles one way pulling a Jeep Wrangler. I’m
Apprehensive but reasonable confident. Most of our journey will be down Route 95 from New England to southern Florida.

Any advice would be helpful and appreciated. Some concerns are where to stop for the night how to navigate though questionable fuel stops. Generally speaking, please illuminate any pitfalls and things I should know.

Greatly appreciate your input


2012 Winnebago Itasca Class A Sunstar 30T
2013 Jeep Sahara (JKU)
2012 Harley Davidson FLHTCUTG
2012 Ford F-250

Dutch_12078

Winters south, summers north

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Posted: 01/31/22 03:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The key thing to remember for fuel stops is to always plan your exit before you enter. Stations with pump islands parallel to the road are ideal, but relatively rare. Travel centers like Pilot/Flying J, Loves, etc, often have more room to maneuver around the gas pumps. End islands are usually the most accessible. As far as your travel route goes, I'll leave it up to others that are more familiar with the current conditions on I-95 to advise you on stops and the best way to bypass Washington D.C. We avoid I-95 for the most part on our trips from upstate NY to Florida, not using it until we hit South Carolina. I-88 to I-81 to I-77 to I-26 to I-95 is our preferred route.


Dutch
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Lwiddis

Cambria, California area

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Posted: 01/31/22 03:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Practice around home (both of you) with an experienced friend on all types of roads.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, WindyNation 300 watt solar-Lossigy 200 AH Lithium battery. Prefer boondocking, USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, state camps. Bicyclist. 14 yr. Army -11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560) IOBC & IOAC grad


Rick Jay

Greater Springfield area, MA

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Posted: 01/31/22 03:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi!

When are you planning to take the trip?

If it's after the threat of snow, I'd recommend the "in land" route staying west of 95 until you hit South Carolina. Basically, something like 84>81>77>26>95. There are a few variations, but that's the general idea. It's a bit longer, but generally less stressful as the traffic is usually lighter. But the biggest advantage is that you can make the trip all the way down without paying a single toll west of CT. Travelling down 95 the tolls will be at least $100, and probably more by now. Depending upon where you are in New England, you might get tagged for a few in MA, NH or ME. Coming back, you'll have to pay one toll over the Hudson River east bound in New York.

If you decide to do 95, know that you can't take the tunnel under Baltimore Harbor on 95. You have to take the beltway around the city. The part of the beltway which heads towards the ocean (east bound) has another toll on it, the westward bound part does not have a toll, but it is a bit longer.

The advantage of 95 is that it is on flatter ground and closer to the ocean, so snow isn't likely to be as much of a problem. But traffic is bad any time of the day. The last time we headed down in the winter, we took the inland route. We didn't see any snow from Massachusetts, until we got to the hills in North Carolina. Nothing major, though. Fortunately.

We generally overnighted at Walmarts. There didn't seem to be much problem finding stations with access for larger rigs. At most major highway exits/entrances you'll usually have a couple of choices. A smartphone which can allow the co-pilot to "scope out" station layout could be helpful, though we didn't have that luxury when we've made the trips. We will next time, though! [emoticon]

Good Luck,

~Rick


2005 Georgie Boy Cruise Master 3625 DS on a Workhorse W-22
Rick, Gail, 1 girl (25-Angel since 2008), 1 girl (20), 2 boys (21 & 18).
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wa8yxm

Davison Michigan (East of Flint)

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Posted: 01/31/22 03:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Get the Pilot/Flying app for your phone.. I used to pull one of two cars and managed to find a Flying-J to stop at most nights on the road (one night) most have Dedicated RV parking, sometimes a tad small for my rig. I looked for Stores with a Denny's restaurant as I'm an AARP member (DISCOUNT)

Cracker Barrell usually has RV parking behind the store.

Many "Wal-Doc" (Stay at wall marks over night) I prefer not to but have done it.

ALWAYS look about you if you do not feel comfortable. park elsewhere.

Also Flying-J's will be noisy It does not bother me. does some.

Finally FUEL up before you park for the night (NOT good when Generator is out of fuel (1/4 tank point) and you need electricity)

Plan your day based on 50 MPH average speed... The math is easier. and so is the drive.


Home was where I park it. but alas the.
2005 Damon Intruder 377 Alas declared a total loss
after a semi "nicked" it. Still have the radios
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MarkTwain

Northern, Ca. , USA

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Posted: 01/31/22 04:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"1st. long trip" Strongly suggest you buy an Emergency Road Side assistance plan. There a number of them for you to evaluate for your RV needs. I have used the Good Sam plan for years and can recommend it. Can't recommend AAA plan, it is designed for primarly cars, not RV's. Most plans are all about the same.

KD4UPL

Swoope, VA

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Posted: 01/31/22 04:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I wouldn't just hook up the Jeep for the first time and go for a 1,5000 mile drive. You need to tow the Jeep around locally first to make sure you've got everything hooked and adjusted right. You don't want to get 100 miles from home and realize you need a part or need to re-do something.

Also, I would avoid I95. I live in VA and I avoid it if at all possible. It is a crowded high speed interstate where nobody cares about speed limits, rules, or anyone else. Any other interstate in VA (even infamous I81) is a picnic compared to I95.

gbopp

The Keystone State

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Posted: 01/31/22 05:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Rick Jay wrote:

I'd recommend the "in land" route staying west of 95 until you hit South Carolina. Basically, something like 84>81>77>26>95.

Excellent advice. Yes, it is a little longer but, A nicer drive. You avoid NYC, Philadelphia, Baltimore and D.C..

larry cad

ohio

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Posted: 01/31/22 05:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you are planning to stop at other than campgrounds, consider Cracker Barrels. Many have RV sites available in their parking lot. We frequently stop at CB, have dinner, and stay all night in the parking lot. Then we have breakfast in the morning and are on our way. They don't object and we've never had a problem.

Interstate rest areas are more and more crowded due to more 18 wheelers stopping early due to electronic log books. Flying J used to be a good stop but not so much anymore. Home Depot, Lowes, and Walmart are still possibles


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valhalla360

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Posted: 01/31/22 09:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Take a short local trip pulling the jeep. That way if something goes wrong, you are close to home and help.


Tammy & Mike
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