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Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > New propane tank

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steveh27

Grosse Pointe Woods, MI

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Posted: 02/21/22 03:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Doug,

I have spent some time trying to get the ASME tank mounted below my Class B replaced. Around me I have found only one place who said they 'may' be able to do it if they can get a tank. They need to inspect it. Getting a new tank is another matter. I spoke to Manchester Tank who makes these and they have a 14 month backlog.

ItsyRV

Lost on the Blue Ridge Parkway

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Posted: 02/22/22 09:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Brownleaf wrote:

Due to severe rust i will be needing a new propane tank. From where would i get one and what is a typical cost to remove and install? Doug

Right now ASME tanks are in short supply and have risen in price. You traditionally call around to every RV shop and supplier to see if they have one available or have a short waiting list for orders. As a last resort, you can find them with online retailers like the big "A". Manchester's are harder to get but FlameKing's seem to be available.

As for the removal and install, since most Class "C"s propane tanks are often mounted under the sides in an open bay, the process is pretty easy so long as nothing was done to alter the tanks mounting or interferes with unbolting. In my case, I had rust welds and topside bracket bolts. Both of these meant a simple unbolting wasn't going to happen.

Since at the time I needed this done all the big RV shops weren't interested in doing it and the smaller local ones were just booked up. I ended up using a small truck shop that also handled air tanks and such. They did the tank removal at the shop and had their mobile service install the tank as it was shipped to my house.

They ended up cuttings the bracket to split them in order to drop the tank. That was followed by grinding the remaining old bracket mounts and welds. They applied a rust treatment and painting the chassis rails.

The install was simply raising the tank with brackets, marking and tacking the bracket on the rail, removing the tank itself, and welding the brackets to the rails. Once done they put the tank to the brackets, spot paint and that was it for them. It would help if you can have it all done in one place at the same time. If you are using a mobile service, raise the RV so they can get under with the tank, tank jack and tools.

Cost wise I spent about $600 for the tank and maybe another $150 for regulator, new hose, decals and misc stuff to void the tank of propane. It was about another $500 for the removal and install which again was done on two different days using two different services from them.

The remove was done in about an hour and the install was under two hours. I also gave them the old tank. The most of my own time was spent voiding the propane from the tank as they wanted it empty. That took a few days and and extra trip to the supermarket for dry ice.

Overall, most class C's are pretty straight forward with the propane tan. Just know rust and other additions (tack welding the bolts, hammering the bolt threads, reversed brackets, etc.) just adds time to the task.


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larry cad

ohio

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Posted: 02/23/22 05:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Before following this thread, I didn't realize propane tanks were so much trouble. My DP is 21 years old and my tank is pristine. However, it is mounted inside a basement compartment, which is why it never needed maintenance.

It's a shame that RV manufacturers mount such a device open to the elements where it will rust away. Amazing.

Does anyone with an exposed tank do regular maintenance on their tank? I am ignorant of such a process, but it seems like a periodic brushing, maybe sanding, and then touch up paint would go a long way to preserving the exposed tank.

As an aside, we heat our home with propane and have a 1000 gal tank outside in the elements. It is 40 years old and still looks good, but I brush it, and sand it and paint it from time to time.

What am I missing?


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Bobbo

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Posted: 02/23/22 07:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

larry cad wrote:

It's a shame that RV manufacturers mount such a device open to the elements where it will rust away.

That is done for venting purposes. If the tank leaks, the propane is not held in a confined space making a bomb.


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steveh27

Grosse Pointe Woods, MI

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Posted: 02/23/22 08:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I scrape, sand, and repaint with rustoleum my tank every 3-4 years, but inside the protection bar it is hard to reach and it has rusted badly. I cannot reach the top either.


larry cad wrote:

Before following this thread, I didn't realize propane tanks were so much trouble. My DP is 21 years old and my tank is pristine. However, it is mounted inside a basement compartment, which is why it never needed maintenance.

It's a shame that RV manufacturers mount such a device open to the elements where it will rust away. Amazing.

Does anyone with an exposed tank do regular maintenance on their tank? I am ignorant of such a process, but it seems like a periodic brushing, maybe sanding, and then touch up paint would go a long way to preserving the exposed tank.

As an aside, we heat our home with propane and have a 1000 gal tank outside in the elements. It is 40 years old and still looks good, but I brush it, and sand it and paint it from time to time.

What am I missing?


Brownleaf

Durham

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Posted: 02/23/22 09:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Great information, thanks.By looking at my pro tank, it alerted me to general rust conditions front to back under my rv. I assessed nothing merits getting rid of it but alot of work is ahead. I think that mud flat in back prevents air flow from the rear that could help air out the under surface. Now I have to find a service that will do a complete rust removal of all under. i would do it except my acid reflux makes that position not good. Doug

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