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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > Axle Bearing Service - Dos and Dont's???

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deltabravo

Spokane, WA

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Posted: 02/28/22 07:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Use good quality grease.

Here's an informative video on two brands of grease from Project Farm. He has some of the best product comparison videos on YouTube.


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st clair

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Posted: 02/28/22 08:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Do it yourself so if out on the road you have the knowledge already to inspect/fix/repair it.

Easy for anyone half-handy.

Car bearings can go 100's of thousands of miles, so why is 10,000 miles a concern?
IDK why trailer bearings need service so often when there are cars with 300k that have never been looked at, serviced or anything and are fine...

You do need to adjust your trailer bearings often, every few thousand miles, and adjust the brakes unless they are self-adjusting, or at least inspect them. etrailer dot come has good info for all the above.

Lift the wheel/axle and wiggle the tire hard and if there is play you need to adjust. If the wheel drags when spun then needs adjust. If it sounds dry then needs grease. Not too much grease or excess will spill into your brakes.

The bearings do not have to be perfect to work, they just need to spin and not be loose one second and too tight the next. I have seen worse bearings on cars that have gone thousands of miles. If able it is best to have good bearings, but do not panic if you are out on a trip and discover they are not perfect. Grease will cover a lot of sins and get you home safely usually.

Baja Man

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Posted: 08/20/22 05:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

quick update....

I waited too long to complete this service and now it's too dang hot to do this work outside!!

As soon as it cools I will git er done!

Info on Timken Bearings Set 17 (L68149/L68111)......

Amazon show images of bearings that have USA imprinted on them, but under "Technical Details" it states country of origin as China. Some Amazon reviewers state that they received bearings Made in USA. I may chance it and return if not USA made. I'm not even sure if stamped USA means made in USA or assembled in USA.

Called Summit Racing today and had them check on the same bearings. Customer service has information that is not available on their website that includes builder/manufacturer information. They looked them up and assured me their info states, "Country of Origin: USA."

I hope this information helps those that prefer to use Timken bearings.


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klutchdust

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Posted: 08/21/22 10:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Replacing the bearing, replace the race. Pull a wheel, replace the seal. Always use a torque wrench on the lug nuts.

* This post was edited 08/21/22 10:31am by klutchdust *

mosseater

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Posted: 08/22/22 08:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A lot of good info here. If the OP has done other types of bearings successfully this should not be a big deal. One item I will mention that I don't see mentioned ever is when disassembled and cleaned up, make sure to check the inner spindle bearing surface. The little hole drilled for the Easy Lube system sits right at the shoulder of the inner bearing seating surface. That little hole was extremely sharp from the factory and can cut a brand new seal lip when installing. I hit it with a small grinding stone and polished with Scotchbrite so the seal will slip over without damage. Also, I upgraded to new spindle nuts and spring keepers over the stock Castle nut and cotter pin arrangment. You want the bearing just on the looser side of zero preload. Don't tighten it down or you'll burn the bearing. Torque the nut to about 40 lb/ft while spinning the wheel, stop spinning and remove nut a few threads, then without moving the wheel, take it in finger tight to the first tightest place you can get the nut retainer on.


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JRscooby

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Posted: 08/24/22 04:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

klutchdust wrote:

Replacing the bearing, replace the race. Pull a wheel, replace the seal. Always use a torque wrench on the lug nuts.



The first thing you should clean/inspect is the race and hub. Most likely you will save the hub so no waste in cleaning it. The race is easy to inspect, compared to bearing. And if the race is bad, no reason to waste time cleaning the bearing, they are junk.

JIMNLIN

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Posted: 08/24/22 07:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

Trailer: 2011 Keystone 25RS
GVWR: 7500#
Axles, bearings, brakes, etc. have never been serviced. (the way I purchased from original owner)
Mileage: Approx. 10,000

My thoughts on trailer brakes or bearings have never been serviced in 11 years/10k miles.
I've put over a dozen new non rv trailers in service using 3500k up to 11k axles...the same sizes and brand axles used on rv trailers.
Before any new or used trailer was put in service the hubs were pulled all brakes and bearings were R&R and serviced.
Several times we caught a axle with no grease on one end or simply not enough grease for that type of work. Or a brake magnet with no 12v due to various reasons.
Point is don't assume the bearings have grease or even proper amount of grease or the brakes are working just cause the trailer is new or used with just 10k miles.

Comparing trailer bearings/wheels/suspensions/etc vs our truck/car/van/suv same components IMO is apples vs marshmallows.


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Jeffrey12

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Posted: 08/24/22 07:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Great feedback from the bloggers on this channel!

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 08/24/22 08:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

Quote:

Trailer: 2011 Keystone 25RS
GVWR: 7500#
Axles, bearings, brakes, etc. have never been serviced. (the way I purchased from original owner)
Mileage: Approx. 10,000

My thoughts on trailer brakes or bearings have never been serviced in 11 years/10k miles.
I've put over a dozen new non rv trailers in service using 3500k up to 11k axles...the same sizes and brand axles used on rv trailers.
Before any new or used trailer was put in service the hubs were pulled all brakes and bearings were R&R and serviced.
Several times we caught a axle with no grease on one end or simply not enough grease for that type of work. Or a brake magnet with no 12v due to various reasons.
Point is don't assume the bearings have grease or even proper amount of grease or the brakes are working just cause the trailer is new or used with just 10k miles.

Comparing trailer bearings/wheels/suspensions/etc vs our truck/car/van/suv same components IMO is apples vs marshmallows.


yup my first warenty claim was because of the factry not greasing the axels properly. replaced two of the 4 hubs. I always recomend checking them and maybe repacking them when you first buy it with good wheel berring grease but after that I only redo them every 5 years for the amount of driving I do.. some one who is always on the move might have to go more often, but every year is mostly because your board.

Steve


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Billyk

Novato ca

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Posted: 08/24/22 10:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just had my bearings packed at tire store 500 bucks


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