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Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > DRW vs SRW safety, tire blowout

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AH_AK

AK

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Posted: 04/08/22 12:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This is great first-hand info. Thanks for sharing it.

I feel extremely confident with the lateral stability of my SRW running 19.5's, but it also has a lot of suspension upgrades.

It is good to know that a rear blowout on a SRW is not likely to result in a Hollywood style rollover.

WarrenS65 wrote:

When I was running my Lance 961 on a 97 Chevy 2500, I had 2 left rear blowouts. First one was with the camper going about 70, second one was with the camper and a 7000# trailer going about 65.
Both times, I felt the truck shudder and start "sloshing" around.
I put on the hazards, eased off the gas, and pulled over to the right.
Changed the tire and back on the road with no loss of control.

I also had a right front blowout on an Isuzu pickup going 80 and had no loss of control. I didn't have a cabover camper, but I did have camper shell loaded with camping gear.

I was never worried about loss of control on a rear blowout, but I'm still concerned about a front blowout with a top heavy camper, in a turn.

I switched to a DRW, not because I was afraid I'd lose control, but because I found my tires were running right at the limit and I wanted a better margin.
I also feel like the DRW was more stable than the SRW, but that could be the springs. Also possible going to 19" wheels on the SRW would have helped.


AH_AK

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Posted: 04/08/22 12:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting, but I think the loss of control dangers are different for blowouts on the hauling vehicle in trailer vs truck camper.
ferndaleflyer wrote:

I have over the years had at least 2 situations that I don't believe I would have survived had I not had a dually.
1-It was Friday before the 4th of July and I was towing a enclosed 32ft 3 axel bumper pull trailer with a race car and assorted junk inside traveling with traffic at about 70mph on I 40 near Burlington NC. The trailer hitch ball sheared off and I went for a ride. I think to this day what saved me was the dual wheels on the truck and the 3 axels on the trailer. Not much damage and I didn't hit anyone.
2-Coming down the hill on I-70 coming into Frederick, MD towing a trailer that was rear end heavy, it started swaying and was almost sideways, I floored it and as soon as it got straight behind me I locked up the brakes and got it stopped. Only the dual wheels stopped it from turning me around and maybe rolling the whole mess.
You never have to much truck.


specta

utah

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Posted: 04/08/22 01:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Such a pointless debate.

Dually are more stable than a SRW pickup.

You either want one or you don't.


Kenny
2011 Chevy 2500 HD 6.0L 4wd
1976 Ford F-250 6.4L 4wd
1995 Lance 945 Onan QG 2500 LP
Regular cab. The best looking trucks.


JRscooby

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Posted: 04/08/22 02:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

specta wrote:

Such a pointless debate.

Dually are more stable than a SRW pickup.

You either want one or you don't.



OTOH, MT dually is more likely to skid on wet pavement than single. Dually is more likely to get stuck on wet grass than single. Single is better on snow/ice when MT

jaycocreek

Idaho

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Posted: 04/08/22 02:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

specta wrote:

Such a pointless debate.

Dually are more stable than a SRW pickup.

You either want one or you don't.


Pretty much...I've had a ton of truck campers through the years,all on SRW and a couple on half tons...They all worked fine driving accordingly..My currant TC is on a dually and the reason I went that way,is where I hunt and play in the mountains,the road in is sloped pretty good too one side or the other..No big deal except you have to go really slow over rocks and dips which slams it to the sides..

I have no issues at all with my DRW as a daily driver loaded or not..to reach his own..


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AH_AK

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Posted: 04/08/22 02:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My intention was not to reignite the SRW vs DRW debate as most of it comes down to preference. I was simply trying to get first- (and second-)hand accounts of SRW blowouts to help quantify (1) the overall likelihood of the occurrence of a rear wheel blowout and (2) the consequences of such an event in SRW vs DRW. Based on the comments so far, it would appear that the probability is quite low and the consequences may not be at catastrophic as one might think.

Anecdotally, I see an obscene number of overloaded SRW’s, hauling huge campers doing 75+ on Alaska’s terrible highways. I have never seen or heard about a catastrophic accident caused by a blowout. On the other hand, there are quite a few trailer blowout accidents that I have driven past or read about. Not sure who would have statistics (maybe insurance companies), but I would think first responders might have a better sense of how often blowout related accidents occur for TC’s.

All suspension components being equal, there is no doubt that DRW is more stable than SRW. For SRW with suspension mods, the gap narrows (IMO). For me, my SRW with suspension mods is great in cornering and fine in cross winds and on uneven roads. A DRW might be better, but the stability of my current rig is perfectly acceptable to me…and I am a weenie about these things.

specta wrote:

Such a pointless debate.

Dually are more stable than a SRW pickup.

You either want one or you don't.


specta

utah

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Posted: 04/09/22 10:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:

specta wrote:

Such a pointless debate.

Dually are more stable than a SRW pickup.

You either want one or you don't.



OTOH, MT dually is more likely to skid on wet pavement than single. Dually is more likely to get stuck on wet grass than single. Single is better on snow/ice when MT


I said more stable.

specta

utah

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Posted: 04/09/22 12:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

[image]

When I bought my current truck I was anticipating on getting a TC for it, I just didn't know that I would end up with such a big and heavy camper.

We used to haul out snowcat with this 2007 regular cab 3500 4-wd with the 8.1L gas engine.

If I could find one just like this one I would buy it. Guarantee it would do a much better hauling my camper in every way.

Especially if a rear tire blew out.

bighatnohorse

Gig Harbor - Cave Creek

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Posted: 04/09/22 05:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A friend had a SRW and didn't know it's total weight.
He carried a large Big Foot camper. And had three two or three blow outs all on the right rear tire.
He finally upgraded to a DRW and never had a blow out after that.

JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 04/09/22 07:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

nteresting, but I think the loss of control dangers are different for blowouts on the hauling vehicle in trailer vs truck camper.

Very much so.
Sudden lose of air pressure on a LDT srw or drw rear axle is a non event carrying a heavy TC.
However pulling a 12k-15k lb GN trailer with a sudden lose of air pressure on the front axle is a big fight to keep it out of the ditch or in the other lane as thy heavy trailer pushes on the trucks rear one direction then another direction.

BTDT with my srw/drw and the same trailers with my service trucks and my truck campers. This was back in the day when we ran on bias ply tires .
Its rare today even on haulers website forums using modern radial LT tires on the LDT tow trucks. Much much better tires today from a safety perspective and long term service.


"good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment" ............ Will Rogers

'03 2500 QC Dodge/Cummins HO 3.73 6 speed manual Jacobs Westach
'97 Park Avanue 28' 5er 11200 two slides

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