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Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > DRW vs SRW safety, tire blowout

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mkirsch

Rochester, NY

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Posted: 06/20/22 08:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Slymer wrote:

Just an FYI on the dually side. We have an SRW but I found out that with a CAA RV membership and you call them regarding an issue with an inside rear tire they will not touch it. You would have to find someone else. I am not sure if AAA has the same policy or not but If I had a dually I would be checking with them.


Any explanation as to why they allegedly have this policy?


Putting 10-ply tires on half ton trucks since aught-four.

brholt

Seattle

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Posted: 06/22/22 02:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We had been running around in our DRW with the camper unloaded. Loaded up the camper and my wife commented the the passenger side rear tires were really bulging. Checked and the inner tire was flat. Unload the camper and replaced the inner tire, which had a nail in it, with the spare.

I have no idea when during the two weeks that the camper was off the tire went flat but, short of checking the tire pressure, I have no idea how you would know.

JoeChiOhki

Sauvie Island, OR

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Posted: 06/22/22 04:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

brholt wrote:

We had been running around in our DRW with the camper unloaded. Loaded up the camper and my wife commented the the passenger side rear tires were really bulging. Checked and the inner tire was flat. Unload the camper and replaced the inner tire, which had a nail in it, with the spare.

I have no idea when during the two weeks that the camper was off the tire went flat but, short of checking the tire pressure, I have no idea how you would know.


I bought a tire whacking stick from a truck stop years ago so I could easily do a quick walk around and thunk each tire and listen for a pitch change.

Flat tires are very noticeable and low tires will have a different pitch than a fully inflated tired. Takes only a couple minutes to do and will alert you to an issue before it becomes a major problem.


My Blog - The Journey of the Redneck Express
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bookmaker

Marianna, FL

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Posted: 07/08/22 08:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Several years ago I had a blowout on the inside rear of a Ford dually with a loaded Lance 1121. I'm darn sure glad I had duals. We were on a 2 lane road about 9pm in rural Alabama and we were able to limp to a church parking lot to deal with it.

Yes, there is a cost factor, but there is a greater safety factor.

Dale


Dale & Rose Cavin, Marianna, FL
2004 Dodge Laramie dually , Cummins diesel
2010 Lance 1181
Previous:
2004 Lance 1121 (lost to hurricane Michael 10/10/18)

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 07/09/22 09:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

just lost a tire thursday night on the way home from the Island on my SRW, pretty un eventfull, had to keep driving a bit as it was in the middle of a construction zone. put the spair on and away I went again. took it in yesterday and it was a screw that did it in, but I totaled the tire driving on the sidewall because I couldnt pull in where I was. two new rear tires on order and I'll be good to go again.

Steve


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2016 Cougar 330RBK
1991 Slumberqueen WS100

3 tons

NV.

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Posted: 07/21/22 08:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The weakest part of a tire is the sidewall…Since you already have uber robust 19.5’s, I’m afraid I’m missing your concern??…I suppose staying home is always an alternative option??

3 tons

AH_AK

AK

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Posted: 07/21/22 01:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

3 tons wrote:

The weakest part of a tire is the sidewall…Since you already have uber robust 19.5’s, I’m afraid I’m missing your concern??…I suppose staying home is always an alternative option??

3 tons


I am not worried about a blowout with those tires. The issue this post was attempting to address was the blowout safety aspect that is often cited by DRW drivers as an argument for DRW over SRW. While logical, my feeling was that this argument for DRW blowout safety superiority is not supported by the accident data. Most of the replies here support that conclusion.

IMO, the advantage of DRW is lateral stability on uneven roads and cross winds. I just returned from a 7500 mile trip with a 12,000 lb SRW (11,000 GVWR, i.e. overloaded). Crosswinds and uneven roads were inconvenient. Not unsafe, but definitely slowed me down and made driving a lot less fun. I can't definitively say that a DRW would have been a more pleasant experience, but it seemed to me that the DRW truck campers were doing better than I was. I am curious to get the camper on a DRW to see if it is just my lack of experience, or, if the wider rear track helps substantially. Based on anecdotal reports from other drivers that went from SRW to DRW, I suspect the difference would be substantial.

3 tons

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Posted: 07/21/22 02:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

AH_AK wrote:

3 tons wrote:

The weakest part of a tire is the sidewall…Since you already have uber robust 19.5’s, I’m afraid I’m missing your concern??…I suppose staying home is always an alternative option??

3 tons


I am not worried about a blowout with those tires. The issue this post was attempting to address was the blowout safety aspect that is often cited by DRW drivers as an argument for DRW over SRW. While logical, my feeling was that this argument for DRW blowout safety superiority is not supported by the accident data. Most of the replies here support that conclusion.

IMO, the advantage of DRW is lateral stability on uneven roads and cross winds. I just returned from a 7500 mile trip with a 12,000 lb SRW (11,000 GVWR, i.e. overloaded). Crosswinds and uneven roads were inconvenient. Not unsafe, but definitely slowed me down and made driving a lot less fun. I can't definitively say that a DRW would have been a more pleasant experience, but it seemed to me that the DRW truck campers were doing better than I was. I am curious to get the camper on a DRW to see if it is just my lack of experience, or, if the wider rear track helps substantially. Based on anecdotal reports from other drivers that went from SRW to DRW, I suspect the difference would be substantial.


Oh got it [emoticon] (sorry, I didn’t peruse the whole thread, so JMHO here…), well to your question, I’ve had both nearly identical trucks (with campers) with the only mechanical difference being SWR vs DRW and my first impression after driving the DRW was truly night and day concerning stability and sway…Part of this I would attribute to the fact that DRW tire size is different (narrower width sidewalls = reduced sway) and that the duallies act very much like outriggers (lateral supports) on a crane - a huge improvement in handling period…Trust that the driving difference is quite substantial and from my perspective ‘well worth’ the extra $1,600 or so premium, in fact due to this additional confidence and safety quotient (thinking of passengers) while carrying a heavy camper I would never go back to a SRW - it’ll work BUT it’s definitely NOT the proper tool for the job…I also camp a lot RZR off-roading on BLM lands, and (while it’s possible…), but I’ve yet to experience a single rock between the rear tires, and often cross the Sierra’s (hwys 50 & 80) in the snow (4x4 cummins, LB, CC, 4:10) and have never been required to chain-up…No chance of going back for us…

I’m glad that you asked…

3 tons

Dave D.

Snohomish, WA, USA

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Posted: 07/21/22 02:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My SRW 2020 Chevy 3500 4X4 does not sway much at all, even with a Host Cascade. 19.5 tires and wheels, Stable Loads on the main springs and overloads, airbags, and a Roadmaster 1 1/4" rear swaybar. It all works together.

The huge swaybar also benefits me when driving the truck empty, keeping both rear tires planted and eliminating the annoying stock axle hop which occurred almost every I pulled out from a corner, or went up a corner around a curve.

Not the first time around the block. Before we went to a class A for several years, I had a Dodge 1-ton Cummins with similar suspension carrying an Arctic Fox 990 (still in my sig pictures!). But this aftermarket suspension package does add up! For most people I'd say just get the dually.


2020 Host Cascade, 2020 Chevy 3500


AH_AK

AK

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Posted: 07/21/22 05:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Mine is a bit older (2012) but has 2 extra leaf springs, ranchos, a bigwig bar, and bags. To be fair (1) the bits that were uncomfortable were on the alcan and other rougher backroads and (2) I am pretty green with no prior experience towing or hauling heavy. For all I know you might hop in my rig and say “what are you talking about, this feels fine”.

All the “nice” roads in WA, OR, and CA felt just fine.

I did notice those commercial 19.5 tires broke in during the trip and stopped following seems and ruts so aggressively…which was nice.

Dave D. wrote:

My SRW 2020 Chevy 3500 4X4 does not sway much at all, even with a Host Cascade. 19.5 tires and wheels, Stable Loads on the main springs and overloads, airbags, and a Roadmaster 1 1/4" rear swaybar. It all works together.

The huge swaybar also benefits me when driving the truck empty, keeping both rear tires planted and eliminating the annoying stock axle hop which occurred almost every I pulled out from a corner, or went up a corner around a curve.

Not the first time around the block. Before we went to a class A for several years, I had a Dodge 1-ton Cummins with similar suspension carrying an Arctic Fox 990 (still in my sig pictures!). But this aftermarket suspension package does add up! For most people I'd say just get the dually.


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