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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > What load capacity should a ladder have for A/Cs?

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MFL

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Posted: 04/10/22 06:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lol...just got a tip from a woman, to make this job easy. "Why not throw a rope over a suitable tree limb, lift AC up with rope, back trailer under dangling AC, lower rope/AC...done."

Jerry





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Posted: 04/10/22 06:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When I put the Atwood on our first trailer I grabbed some pallets and trash 2X4 and built staging in the back of my truck that was parked as close as possible to the trialer. If I remember it was only two levels to get it up on the roof. The wife and I lifted it into the truck, then up one level, then we stood on the first level and lifted it to the second and finally up on the roof.


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JRscooby

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Posted: 04/10/22 06:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

larry cad wrote:

JRscooby wrote:

Can I expand a little?
What about the roof? Will it handle the weight of you and the AC concentrated in the small area of your feet?
I used a couple of pieces of Styrofoam, set AC on to slide from side to hole. Step ladder in back of pickup to get it on roof, with line around it. Up another step ladder to pull across near hole. Then a stepstool inside to lift and guide it into the hole.
Another idea. To me, holding the inside part up, aligning and starting the longdonkey bolts was a PITA. Cut 2 pieces of all-thread little longer than bolts, screwed into holes. But the plate up, EZ to guide AT thru holes, start nuts. Then nuts hold in place while you start the bolts in other holes. Double-nut the all-thread to remove, last 2 bolts.


Typically the roof will support you and the AC as it has to support the A/C all the time anyway.

I've personally changed out several A/C units and have never needed any allthread to do it. Bolts went in easy. If not, the A/C is not located correctly.


I have often had to work to get long bolts started when they go thru something thin, had no support guiding to holes, like putting thru bolts in motors. The top part in hole, but on mine the only guide to position the bottom part is the bolts. Add that to the issues many old people have working overhead... With the all-thread, just like putting a album on turntable, or the top on old air cleaner. Look thru hole to see pin, watch it into place.
Now I found using rod for alignment made it much easier. And I found that setting the unit overhanging the roof hole, but propped up so I could lift and align from below made it easier to position without push gasket out of place

Acampingwewillgo

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Posted: 04/10/22 08:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Having done this a few times over the years, the extension ladder is pretty easy. As others have pointed out, use a towel/piece of rug to protect side of RV. Leave the air conditioner in the box to help prevent damage. I placed the box onto a piece of plywood slightly larger than the air conditioner box, secured box to plywood, drill a couple of holes in plywood for rope( similiar to a "Y" connection). You want the extension ladder to be right at the same height as the roof of the RV thus you having to pull it up over the rungs of the ladder(thus sliding right onto the roof.)

Ok....still takes two people. One person pushing and sliding the plywood up the ladder and the other person pulling on the rope while on the roof. It actually goes pretty easy. My RV has a fiberglass roof and I'm not small....weight was no issue!


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midnightsadie

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Posted: 04/11/22 06:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

just find a dealer or some one who,s done this. if it cost you $500.bucks whats your life worth. better yet injuring your wife or yourself for life.always done my own maint, but not this. p.s you could rent a scaffol and slide it in place.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 04/11/22 08:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

1320Fastback wrote:

When I put the Atwood on our first trailer I grabbed some pallets and trash 2X4 and built staging in the back of my truck that was parked as close as possible to the trialer. If I remember it was only two levels to get it up on the roof. The wife and I lifted it into the truck, then up one level, then we stood on the first level and lifted it to the second and finally up on the roof.


Similar to what we did (me and my DW), instead of pallets I used several 2x12s across the top of the truck bed for the A/C to sit on. Placed a sturdy 8ft step ladder in the truck bed (not opened) against the side of the trailer and secured the step ladder to the truck bed.

This splits the amount of height one must lift a heavy bulky object.

However, in hind sight, at that time was young and dumb to not think about the what if's of the plan if things went sideways.

Reality is once you have an heavy bulky object at arms height or higher (above your head) you do lose strength and control and it places your body directly and squarely in the path of that heavy and bulky object if for any reason one person loses grip or balance of said heavy object.

Yes, we got it done, wasn't easy, wasn't pretty, wasn't fun and wasn't safe and the last foot or two was downright sketchy and dangerous.

Fast forward many yrs worth of experience later and I would not consider attempting this same feat manually. Using some sort of safer way with mechanical advantage like a purpose built lift, front loader, ect will get the job done in a much safer manor in a much faster way for a much more reasonable cost than ones life, health, safety.

Be very careful about just throwing a line into a tree and dangling the unit from that. Tree limbs can be pretty good looking but yet dead or rotted inside and one will never know that until it breaks. One would also want to use not just a rope, but a rope, pulley and a winch with a brake.

Pulley reduces friction it takes to get the item in the air.

Winch with brake makes lifting effort easier plus the brake gives you some means to control the item at all times.

Think safety first..

MFL

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Posted: 04/11/22 10:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote: "Be very careful about just throwing a line into a tree and dangling the unit from that. Tree limbs can be pretty good looking but yet dead or rotted inside and one will never know that until it breaks. One would also want to use not just a rope, but a rope, pulley and a winch with a brake.

Pulley reduces friction it takes to get the item in the air.

Winch with brake makes lifting effort easier plus the brake gives you some means to control the item at all times.

Think safety first.."

Gde...Thanks for being Debbie the downer! My lady friend just threw this out, when I asked her, if she'd be willing to push an AC up the ladder. I thought her quick response was noteworthy, while we all know to be careful, and a rope not being best choice, compared to a winch.

Kind of like using a crane, but most have more trees, than cranes.

Jerry

JIMNLIN

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Posted: 04/11/22 12:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't think a average size woman can dead lift 80 lbs with a rope up a ladder by herself. Strong male adult/teen under side pushing up the ladder and the average size woman pulling a rope on the roof sounds doable.
All kinds of rental lift equipment out here to make the job easier/safer. Or a neighbor with a tractor with a bucket that will level lift the A/C to a 11'-12' to the rear roof line.

Not all rv trailer roofs have the same load limits. Mine does but that don't mean all will.

Ladder load capacity will need to be enough to cover the persons weight plus the A/C weight on the ladder while he/she is pushing up.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 04/11/22 01:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This thread has the makin's of Entertaining Thread of the Month. Keeper up boys! LOL

OP, the only ladder you have a chance of sliding it up on successfully is an extension ladder. And it makes sense, however based on the nature of your question, you're not really a handyman, so don't put your wife under it on the ladder.


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Posted: 04/11/22 01:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

midnightsadie wrote:

just find a dealer or some one who,s done this. if it cost you $500.bucks whats your life worth. better yet injuring your wife or yourself for life.always done my own maint, but not this. p.s you could rent a scaffol and slide it in place.


ROFL.
How do you get it 10'-12' up on the second level of scaffolding?
Pull it up with a rope? lol

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