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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > Trying to figure out what trailers I can tow

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uses1823

Apex, NC

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Posted: 04/17/22 01:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've made some calculations on an online towing capacity calculator, and it looks good.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/vumx65pr4ssfpug/2.png?dl=0

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 04/17/22 02:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It’s still no problem to pull a trailer that size, but you’re still grossly off on either your truck’s options or your truck’s towing capacity. Hemi/3.92 gears is way more than 6800lb tow rating.


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GrandpaKip

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Posted: 04/18/22 08:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

654 + 400 + 300 = 1354 leaving you with about 100 pounds
Depending on the WD hitch, that may be gone.
You may be able to keep stuff to about 500 lbs, but most on here will say closer to 1000 lbs.
We’ve got about 800 in the trailer and for a 2 week trip another 300 in the truck.
Can you do it? Sure, lots of people overload their trucks. See it all the time in campgrounds.
I drove at max for years and probably was over for quite a bit of that time.
I now have about a 300 lb cushion.


Kip
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TurnThePage

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Posted: 04/18/22 08:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I still don't understand that low towing capacity number, but regardless, I think that truck would easily handle that trailer.


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toedtoes

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Posted: 04/18/22 09:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

GrandpaKip wrote:

654 + 400 + 300 = 1354 leaving you with about 100 pounds
Depending on the WD hitch, that may be gone.
You may be able to keep stuff to about 500 lbs, but most on here will say closer to 1000 lbs.
We’ve got about 800 in the trailer and for a 2 week trip another 300 in the truck.
Can you do it? Sure, lots of people overload their trucks. See it all the time in campgrounds.
I drove at max for years and probably was over for quite a bit of that time.
I now have about a 300 lb cushion.


If the 300lbs is IN the trailer as the OP states, then your calculation would be wrong.

OP.

Payload (1447) = weight of driver, passengers, stuff in or on tow vehicle and hitch weight (260 + 200 + 654 = 1114lbs total).

Towing capacity (6280) = gvwr of trailer (estimate) OR weight of loaded trailer (actual). The 300lbs of "stuff" you expect to put IN the trailer is already assumed if you use the gvwr of the trailer.


These numbers leave you a "cushion" of about 333lbs of payload (less if you add a WD system) and 280lbs of towing capacity.

Now you need to consider where and how you will be driving. If you will be traveling in the mountains and/or driving long distances, you may be cutting it tight. For most, it is preferred to stay about 20 percent under capacity - it reduces the strain on the truck's engine AND it is less stressful for the driver (especially if you are not an experienced tower).

That would mean staying at or under a trailer gvwr of 5,000lbs for a truck with a 6,280lb towing capacity OR at or above a truck towing capacity of 7,500lbs for a trailer gvwr of 6,000lbs.

If you will be driving flat terrain only and/or short (1-3 hour) trips, then you may not need or want that extra cushion.


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ssthrd

Vancouver Island

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Posted: 04/18/22 09:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TurnThePage wrote:

I still don't understand that low towing capacity number, but regardless, I think that truck would easily handle that trailer.


Should be the same or close to my 2013 Tundra which was 9800lbs. OP, you should be good. Go have some fun.


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Boomerweps

Hills of PA

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Posted: 04/18/22 10:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

So, do the majority of persons replying here, who are either arguing semantics or instructing how to theoretically determine what is permissible by the trucks ratings….do you guys actually know the answer or do you just like hearing yourself talk?
“An excellent missive…”. WTH kind of reply is that?
If you don’t have a relatively educated ACTUAL response for the OP, then it means you’re as clueless as him. So why not refrain and hope to gain something g from the thread rather than polluting it with arguments about how much the avg human weighs or mis interpreting the unit weight of gasoline?
Good grief…


STAND BACK!
I’ve got a large vocabulary and I’m not afraid to use it! [emoticon]
It’s called a discussion. OP isn’t paying for answers and they get their money’s worth.
Like any other web forum, OP gets to sort through the chaff (like this post) & gets to have the final decision.
Bad day, Grit dog?


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2019 F150 4x4 SCrew SB STX 5.0 3.55 factory tow package, 7000#GVWR, 1990 CC Tow mirrors, TBC


GrandpaKip

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Posted: 04/18/22 10:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

toedtoes wrote:

GrandpaKip wrote:

654 + 400 + 300 = 1354 leaving you with about 100 pounds
Depending on the WD hitch, that may be gone.
You may be able to keep stuff to about 500 lbs, but most on here will say closer to 1000 lbs.
We’ve got about 800 in the trailer and for a 2 week trip another 300 in the truck.
Can you do it? Sure, lots of people overload their trucks. See it all the time in campgrounds.
I drove at max for years and probably was over for quite a bit of that time.
I now have about a 300 lb cushion.


If the 300lbs is IN the trailer as the OP states, then your calculation would be wrong.

OP.

Payload (1447) = weight of driver, passengers, stuff in or on tow vehicle and hitch weight (260 + 200 + 654 = 1114lbs total).

Towing capacity (6280) = gvwr of trailer (estimate) OR weight of loaded trailer (actual). The 300lbs of "stuff" you expect to put IN the trailer is already assumed if you use the gvwr of the trailer.


These numbers leave you a "cushion" of about 333lbs of payload (less if you add a WD system) and 280lbs of towing capacity.

Now you need to consider where and how you will be driving. If you will be traveling in the mountains and/or driving long distances, you may be cutting it tight. For most, it is preferred to stay about 20 percent under capacity - it reduces the strain on the truck's engine AND it is less stressful for the driver (especially if you are not an experienced tower).

That would mean staying at or under a trailer gvwr of 5,000lbs for a truck with a 6,280lb towing capacity OR at or above a truck towing capacity of 7,500lbs for a trailer gvwr of 6,000lbs.

If you will be driving flat terrain only and/or short (1-3 hour) trips, then you may not need or want that extra cushion.

You are correct. BCC (before coffee calculation)

MFL

Midwest

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Posted: 04/18/22 11:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Boomer...I think what Grit is saying, is that some of the discussion, just adds more confusion to the OP. Who is he supposed to believe? The guy that writes the longest book (adding more confusion)? The guy that writes his misunderstanding in bold, to make his wrong, seem right? The guy that has no clue, that gasoline is much lighter than water?

Like you said, some know a little, but after a while, wonder off, where their knowledge tends to stray from reality.

Anyway, I agreed with you on page 2, to keep it simple, by just subtracting one sticker from the other.

The truck the OP is looking at will work, for the trailer he is considering.

Jerry





Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 04/18/22 11:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Boomerweps wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

So, do the majority of persons replying here, who are either arguing semantics or instructing how to theoretically determine what is permissible by the trucks ratings….do you guys actually know the answer or do you just like hearing yourself talk?
“An excellent missive…”. WTH kind of reply is that?
If you don’t have a relatively educated ACTUAL response for the OP, then it means you’re as clueless as him. So why not refrain and hope to gain something g from the thread rather than polluting it with arguments about how much the avg human weighs or mis interpreting the unit weight of gasoline?
Good grief…


STAND BACK!
I’ve got a large vocabulary and I’m not afraid to use it! [emoticon]
It’s called a discussion. OP isn’t paying for answers and they get their money’s worth.
Like any other web forum, OP gets to sort through the chaff (like this post) & gets to have the final decision.
Bad day, Grit dog?


In my best Canadian voice, sooory! I appreciate your contribution as well.
And you're right, that is a good beginner's guide to the "lingo" and what it means.
My point was, not unlike many/most discussions here, which seem to get farther off track and more mis-informed than other public forums I'm on, if ya don't know, it's best to not reply.
If I read a post of someone asking how to repair a refrigerator, I don't reply, because I don't know. However it appears that many folks can't control themselves like that.
The "chaff" is what confuses the person asking for advice.

Heck, the OP can't even find the right tow rating for his truck yet. He's very likely not able to weed through the rest of the info and know what is true or false.

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