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Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > SiO2 Batteries and High Amp Draws

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StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 05/21/22 09:44am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BFL13 wrote:



They say you can run them down to Zero SOC many times no problem, but I have seen ads for AGMs saying the same thing.

So you can run them down past what would trip the inverter to just run ordinary low amp RV loads ok

The voltage drop is also from wiring not just from the batteries, so if I had fatter wiring and all that, the inverter could go lower in battery SOC before tripping, so my result could be different from another guy's with the same battery

I count the "0.45C" as using the C at the time, not the rated C when at 100% SOC, so watch for that when reading my numbers. Eg the 90 amps when the 200AH bank is at 110AH is 90/110 = 82% draw the way I do it.

I only took it to the inverter alarm at 11v not to the cut off at 10.5v so I don't know how much farther down in SOC it would go to get to 10.5

They have a somewhat higher voltage per SOC than Flooded batts so that helps with going lower in SOC before tripping the inverter too.


ya they say you can ocasionaly run them down to 0, but for maximum life stay above 50%. I do like this as it is a saftey net for the average person that kills batteries by acadently letting them get down to 0.

but I have to be honest , I am not that impressed with the current draw you got on them. yes it is the same as the four, 6V I have in my 5th wheel, maybe a tiny bit better, but two 100amp LFP will handle the same voltage and stay above 12V to aproximatly 10% capacity so I don't see an advantage there against LFP, but ya it is definatly a step up from normal batteries.

there is a place for SiO2, but I think there price now puts them out of reach for most, aside for the people who actualy do need them like PT, but even there he has been saving for 3 years. I think they are now the most expensive per AH of the main battery types, last time I checked.

I guess the way I look at these, and yes I did look at them and weigh the pros and cons when PT first started advertising them. I looked at upgrading to them but the only advantage I would have got is the cold weather usability and a slightly higher amp draw capacity. at almost 700 bucks per 100 AH battery x 4 it was just way to far out of my price range. I thought about them again when I went to upgrade the camper so I would have paid 1400 buck for 200ah capacity and to get maximum life I could use 100AH of that capacity so no gain over the cheep GC2 i stuffed in there as a temp measure. I ended up going with 300AH of LFP with a 100Amp BMS. I didnt need anymore amp draw capacity , there was an option for a 125amp or a 150amp BMS. but in the camper I am also worried about weight and size so about 1000 bucks I did the new camper setup.

but like I said if weight , size are not a concern and you do really cold weather camping its a option.


2014 F350 6.7 Platinum
2016 Cougar 330RBK
1991 Slumberqueen WS100

BFL13

Victoria, BC

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Posted: 05/21/22 10:15am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

StirCrazy, you are right about the cost etc. And LFPs do better for high draws.

I got sort of sucked in--sad tale of woe follows:

I got one for the camper when the scenario was to be 1 day trips to local dog things so DW has her own hideaway and bathroom. (Class C too big for that job) and I wanted the MW to work for her off the inverter.

At the time the 100AH SiO2 was $700 and a 100AH drop-in LFP was $1400. (They still are around here!)

Then DW said the new plan was to use the camper for weekend dog things so 100AH was not enough. Goal posts moved. Oh well.

So I decided I was stuck with having to get more battery and it had to be the same type (perhaps wrong on that, don't know). So got a second SiO2 for $500 this time on sale. (They must have wanted to unload some inventory before Xmas maybe) So now that is 200AH for $1200 vs 100AH for $1400.(200AH for $2800 yipes!) I also stole a solar panel off the Class C for the camper.

But now with 200AH bank the 55 amp draw of the MW could have been done by ordinary AGMs. 200AH AGMs about $500 then (700 now) Drat.

Water under the bridge and I do get to use the kettle at 90 amps as reported. That other guy on here wanted to start an SiO2 club, but there was no T-shirt so I didn't join. Maybe it was really a "support group" [emoticon]


1. 1991 Oakland 28DB Class C
on Ford E350-460-7.5 Gas EFI
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2. 1991 Bighorn 9.5ft Truck Camper on 2003 Chev 2500HD 6.0 Gas
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3 tons

NV.

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Posted: 05/21/22 11:16am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ha! now that’s truly a great story, in fact, ‘loved it’ [emoticon] though not all too uncommon - I can’t hardly count how many times that kinda thing has happened to me (ugg!), in a more memorable case, a series suspension upgrades, undo’s, then reworks, and electronics is yet another - lol…Retrospection is what makes us the ‘experts’ we are (lol!), but lucky for you, there’s no need for an dreaded undo!!

3 tons

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 05/21/22 01:12pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

604 times to dead on SiO2 will reduce capacity to 80% of new.

* This post was edited 05/22/22 10:19am by pianotuna *


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp-hours of Telcom jars, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 05/21/22 01:21pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If price is the only parameter, along with no maintenance, then it is hard to beat reconditioned telcom jars. Mine are 4 years old. They will support the microwave at 170 amps.

I just did bacon and egg in the micro at a fairly new campground (4 years old). On a 30 amp service the load support cut in and drew 95 amps. The toaster did not trigger load support.

BFL13's test is not when the batteries are at 100%--and that's good because that's a real life scenario.

* This post was edited 05/21/22 05:52pm by pianotuna *

BFL13

Victoria, BC

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Posted: 05/21/22 02:32pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We should be clear that 200AH of SiO2 does not equate to four 6s, except for the high draws. You still need AH for regular RV draws and for that work 200 is not the same as 460!

That is why I needed the second battery even though the one batt could do the high draws. Not enough AH for the regular camping for a weekend in this case.

Same thing could happen to somebody buying a 100AH LFP. Doesn't matter what it can do for features--it is still only 100AH so if you need more AH for the regular stuff it is very expensive to have to get a second one just for that work.

I tried a work- around for that in one of my set-ups, by having the inverter on just the one batt and have cheaper regular batts in a separate bank for the regular stuff.

So of course the regular stuff bank got low, but I could not tap into the inverter's batt to get more AH to help run the regular stuff. Better to have one big bank that does it all. (Such as in the Class C with four 6s)

Just to be clear and not confuse anybody.

jaycocreek

Idaho

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Posted: 05/21/22 04:09pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Humm..I have a 1500 watt Wagan msw on one 120ah lfp and a 1000 watt Wagan psw on a 100ah lfp with my third 100ah lfp house battery with a 300 watt Giandel psw..Something for each battery with solar for each battery..

Different but it works for the way I use things


Lifepo4-380ah/Lithium NMC-140ah/Solar-400 watts/Wagan & Giandel PSW/Engel & Iceco 3-1 compressor fridge freezer/5K Window AC/Honda 2K

BFL13

Victoria, BC

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Posted: 05/21/22 06:46pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jaycocreek wrote:

Humm..I have a 1500 watt Wagan msw on one 120ah lfp and a 1000 watt Wagan psw on a 100ah lfp with my third 100ah lfp house battery with a 300 watt Giandel psw..Something for each battery with solar for each battery..

Different but it works for the way I use things


I am guessing you can swap around as needed if one gets too low, but another still has some spare AH

jaycocreek

Idaho

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Posted: 05/21/22 07:44pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

I am guessing you can swap around as needed if one gets too low, but another still has some spare AH


Yes but the house battery runs the tv/DVD lights etc and the other two handle the heavy loads,the PSW runs the microwave/ coffee pot and the MSW runs the toaster oven or anything else for that matter..200 watts on the roof to the house battery and 100 each portable to the other two or 200 to one...Could go 400 watts total to any of them..

If I had it all to do over,I would buy either a 200ah LFP or two identical 100ah batteries to parralel..I do like the idea of having a stand alone for the heavy loads,makes it easier to baby sit while life goes on for the rest..

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 05/22/22 08:12am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BFL13 wrote:

StirCrazy, you are right about the cost etc. And LFPs do better for high draws.

I got sort of sucked in--sad tale of woe follows:

I got one for the camper when the scenario was to be 1 day trips to local dog things so DW has her own hideaway and bathroom. (Class C too big for that job) and I wanted the MW to work for her off the inverter.

At the time the 100AH SiO2 was $700 and a 100AH drop-in LFP was $1400. (They still are around here!)

Then DW said the new plan was to use the camper for weekend dog things so 100AH was not enough. Goal posts moved. Oh well.

So I decided I was stuck with having to get more battery and it had to be the same type (perhaps wrong on that, don't know). So got a second SiO2 for $500 this time on sale. (They must have wanted to unload some inventory before Xmas maybe) So now that is 200AH for $1200 vs 100AH for $1400.(200AH for $2800 yipes!) I also stole a solar panel off the Class C for the camper.

But now with 200AH bank the 55 amp draw of the MW could have been done by ordinary AGMs. 200AH AGMs about $500 then (700 now) Drat.

Water under the bridge and I do get to use the kettle at 90 amps as reported. That other guy on here wanted to start an SiO2 club, but there was no T-shirt so I didn't join. Maybe it was really a "support group" [emoticon]


haha, weird that they are so expensive there for LFP. you had to order the Sio2 and just doing a quick search a drop in bought online from alberta lithium is 550ish this one

but ya it makes sence if you alreay had one to get another , after all what are you going to do, throw it out.

Steve

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