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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > PSI when using higher load range tires.

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JRscooby

Indepmo

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Posted: 08/31/22 06:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm too lazy, or don't care enough to look at the inflation charts.
You think you need the weight carrying capacity of the heavier tires? I would be surprised to learn you get added capacity without increasing the pressure.

Grit dog

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Posted: 08/31/22 10:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TheOMB wrote:

My trailer had 4, D load range tires. From advice of many friends I've up graded to E load range. Just got a set of Good Year Endurance with max PSI of 80. Previous tires and trailer sticker says PSI 65.

Should I run 65, 80 or other PSI?

Visually the Load Range E look better at 80 PSI without a slight bulge.


So none of the 3 pages of responders can even give you any sort of sound advice as you haven't even posted what the trailer axle loads are (approximately, at least).
Some responses off topic, others, a reflection of anecdotal experience, and others, well, I'm not sure....
I can't answer your question either, since I don't know even remotely what your axle loads are, but reasonably, if D load tries were sufficiently carrying the load as designed at 65psi, then you have zero need to raise pressure beyond what you were running before, regardless of whether the tires have a greater max psi rating.

Trailer tires do NOT necessarily need to be run at max sidewall pressure, if the tires are rated significantly higher than the load they're carrying.

The weekend warrior, less than informed responses, will tell you that even though it is 100% untrue.

Post your weights, or find them and use a load pressure chart and decide for yourself what is acceptable by design (the chart) and what feels good going down the road.


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javatoto

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Posted: 09/09/22 07:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi hey you did great getting load range E. Ill tell you what I found to be true. If your bit over weight drop tire pressure 8-12 LBS also if hot outside drop pressure 8-12 LBS from stated psi 80 in your trailer. I run 68-72 all the time. Before les Schwab guys would tell me 80 but kept blowing tires 5-6 per year Yeck. Someone finally said to drop pressure and now I almost forgot how to change tires! Yeah. Also get you a ramp when you have a blow out you'll just put behind the back wheel if front wheel blown and back up on to ramp instead of trims Jack leave busted wheel hanging. Be sure to loosen lugs before backing onto ramp. Fast easy safe

valhalla360

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Posted: 09/09/22 08:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

javatoto wrote:

Before les Schwab guys would tell me 80 but kept blowing tires 5-6 per year


Assuming we are talking about an RV with 4 tires and the tires are rated for 80psi...something is seriously wrong if you are blowing 5-6 tires per year.

At best dropping the a few psi is masking the real issue...or there is more to the story.


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Posted: 09/09/22 09:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

javatoto said: "If your bit over weight drop tire pressure 8-12 LBS also if hot outside drop pressure 8-12 LBS from stated psi 80 in your trailer."

These statements make no sense! Overloaded ST tires will handle less load, with reduced air pressure.

ST trailer tires with 8-12 psi reduced pressure will run even hotter, in extreme heat.

Is this maybe just a troll first post?

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Posted: 09/09/22 09:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MFL wrote:

javatoto said: "If your bit over weight drop tire pressure 8-12 LBS also if hot outside drop pressure 8-12 LBS from stated psi 80 in your trailer."

These statements make no sense! Overloaded ST tires will handle less load, with reduced air pressure.

ST trailer tires with 8-12 psi reduced pressure will run even hotter, in extreme heat.

Is this maybe just a troll first post?

Jerry


I just ASSUMED it was a troll post .... Who in their right mind would drop psi on heavier weight trailer?? That goes against ALL logic


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Grit dog

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Posted: 09/09/22 09:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

javatoto wrote:

Hi hey you did great getting load range E. Ill tell you what I found to be true. If your bit over weight drop tire pressure 8-12 LBS also if hot outside drop pressure 8-12 LBS from stated psi 80 in your trailer. I run 68-72 all the time. Before les Schwab guys would tell me 80 but kept blowing tires 5-6 per year Yeck. Someone finally said to drop pressure and now I almost forgot how to change tires! Yeah. Also get you a ramp when you have a blow out you'll just put behind the back wheel if front wheel blown and back up on to ramp instead of trims Jack leave busted wheel hanging. Be sure to loosen lugs before backing onto ramp. Fast easy safe


Imma go 50/50 on this one.
I could justify dropping pressure a bit for big temperature swings since 10deg = 1-2psi of static pressure change if volume remains the same. But it's not necessary, save for overtly extreme temperature and altitude changes. Frankly, if you had 70-75psi cold, you'll be at 75-80psi by the time the tires get warmed up just from traveling at highway speeds. If you start at 80 cold, the tires will handle 85, 90psi also. It's what they're designed to do.
Too much minutia worried about with tire pressures.



But the drop pressure if overweight is approximately 100% bad information. If anything, raise your pressure above max sidewall. (I'll qualify, I've never done this with 80psi tires, but I do it often with lighter rated truck tires, when the back of the ole 1/2 ton on factory rubber needs to play big truck for the day!)

* This post was edited 09/09/22 11:12am by Grit dog *

TheOMB

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Posted: 09/09/22 11:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for all the replies. I've been busy working and just drove from Nebraska to Maryland with my truck and travel trailer with 10,000 to 11,000 pounds loaded.

I decided to run 70 PSI cold and the ride seems better than at 65 PSI cold.

I did some research based on all the comments.

My wondering about PSI was sparked by the tire installer putting 80 PSI in the 3rd set of Goodyear Endurance E load range tires I've put on my trailer.

Without research I would have just deflated to 65 PSI cold like I've done with every tire I've had on the trailer since 2014. I learned sometime in my late 20's that my grandfather taught me wrong to air tires to PSI on tires. We air to the spec written on the door of auto... So that's what I've done with trailer but since I upgraded load range I wondered.

I found my rims could handle 80 PSI if needed.

The valve stem I could not figure out PSI but there likely good to 80 PSI. Every Valve Stem spec chart I read showed if stem could handle 65, it could also handle 80.

So... based on what Goodyear specs are, my likely weight and a few other things I've tried 70. For my next jump I'll try 65 and see if I feel the difference.

Thanks again for replies and hopefully this follow up post won't spark more debate [emoticon]


Cheers

Grit dog

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Posted: 09/09/22 11:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TheOMB wrote:

Thanks for all the replies. I've been busy working and just drove from Nebraska to Maryland with my truck and travel trailer with 10,000 to 11,000 pounds loaded.

I decided to run 70 PSI cold and the ride seems better than at 65 PSI cold.

I did some research based on all the comments.

My wondering about PSI was sparked by the tire installer putting 80 PSI in the 3rd set of Goodyear Endurance E load range tires I've put on my trailer.

Without research I would have just deflated to 65 PSI cold like I've done with every tire I've had on the trailer since 2014. I learned sometime in my late 20's that my grandfather taught me wrong to air tires to PSI on tires. We air to the spec written on the door of auto... So that's what I've done with trailer but since I upgraded load range I wondered.

I found my rims could handle 80 PSI if needed.

The valve stem I could not figure out PSI but there likely good to 80 PSI. Every Valve Stem spec chart I read showed if stem could handle 65, it could also handle 80.

So... based on what Goodyear specs are, my likely weight and a few other things I've tried 70. For my next jump I'll try 65 and see if I feel the difference.

Thanks again for replies and hopefully this follow up post won't spark more debate [emoticon]


The debate is partly because you haven't provided enough info for an accurate recommendation and based on this post, you and your grandfather are still not actually correct when it comes to tire load/pressure.
Combine that with the inconsistent and somewhat unrealistic other "info" you've provided....
-Never even said tire size. I've gleaned, maybe incorrectly that they're 15" 225-75s likely? If 16" then wouldn't have been LR D in my experience. Totally different tires and the 15s SHOULD be near 80psi if your loaded weight is right. 16s you could run about 20psi less and still have capacity.
- 1st post, just upgraded from LR Ds. Last post, on your 3rd set of LR E Endurance tires...a tire that's only even been available for about 4 years now. Which is it?

If you can't even be consistent with the info you provide, you surely can't get the right answer to your questions unless purely by chance.

And the fact that you allude to putting mega miles on your trailer (and your website supports that assumption on my part), it also seems like you're looking for a solution or answer to a problem that doesn't exist.

Mike134

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Posted: 09/09/22 03:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lwiddis wrote:

Being one of the many, I disagree with BB. Just like eTrailer disagrees with BB. “I can end this debate for you real fast! Trailer tires, which will have an ST in front of the size, should always be inflated to the maximum psi indicated on the tire.” See https://www.etrailer.com/question-78836.html

A tire retailer advising its customers very clearly.


It's very clear they are salesmen of unknown knowledge about tires.

Then again you could check with the manufacturer who just might know a bit more.

https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf


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