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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > PSI when using higher load range tires.

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time2roll

Southern California

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Posted: 09/09/22 07:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TheOMB wrote:

I learned sometime in my late 20's that my grandfather taught me wrong to air tires to PSI on tires. We air to the spec written on the door of auto... So that's what I've done with trailer but since I upgraded load range I wondered.
Your Grandfather was right for the times he lived. And he was just talking about car tires without changes to size or load range. Air pressure was far more important in the days of bias ply tires or even the early radials. Pressure would have a greater effect on ride and tire wear back in those days. Filling to sidewall max would give the car a harsh ride and wear the center tread significantly faster.

Today's modern radial is far better at holding the tread flat with steel belts and the sidewalls don't stiffen as much with a few extra pounds. I prefer the handling and firmer ride with a bit more pressure and have no tread wear issues.

Trailer tires (ST) tend to recommend max pressure in most conditions. Only time to air down to the pressure chart would be to resolve a handling or ride issue. This is different than what is done with car tires. Fully inflated will give the maximum load rating and probably a small increase in economy.

The tire world has changed some since Grandpa's day.


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TheOMB

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Posted: 09/10/22 06:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:


The debate is partly because you haven't provided enough info for an accurate recommendation and based on this post, you and your grandfather are still not actually correct when it comes to tire load/pressure.
Combine that with the inconsistent and somewhat unrealistic other "info" you've provided....
-Never even said tire size. I've gleaned, maybe incorrectly that they're 15" 225-75s likely? If 16" then wouldn't have been LR D in my experience. Totally different tires and the 15s SHOULD be near 80psi if your loaded weight is right. 16s you could run about 20psi less and still have capacity.
- 1st post, just upgraded from LR Ds. Last post, on your 3rd set of LR E Endurance tires...a tire that's only even been available for about 4 years now. Which is it?

If you can't even be consistent with the info you provide, you surely can't get the right answer to your questions unless purely by chance.

And the fact that you allude to putting mega miles on your trailer (and your website supports that assumption on my part), it also seems like you're looking for a solution or answer to a problem that doesn't exist.


Thanks for your observations .You are correct. I did not provide enough info for an absolute accurate recommendation. At 1st thought I did not think finding answer would be complicated. I figured an answer with in a margin of error would be apparent.

You've gleaned correctly that they're ST225/75/R15

Sorry to imply this was my 1st set of Good Year Endurance E load range tires, these are my 3rd and they are uprade from the original D load range. I also had a set or two of other E load range tires before the Endurance.

1st set I got was on 10/12/2017 and put about 27,000 miles on them.
- I remember my main tire guy said they were a new series and only found a few online reviews but all reviews were good.
- I had zero issues with this set.

2nd set was on 5/20/19 and I got about 32,000 miles out of them lasting thru August 2022
- They showed minumal wear but one blew on the inner wall. My TPMS caught the deflation and I was able to avoid damage to trailer.
- I was planning to change this second set in November at end of my season with trailer.

Tire installer on 1st two sets put in 65 PSI.

The inner tire wall blow out and max 80 PSI installer put in these new E load range tires (upgraded from original D load range) had me wondering about PSI.

My trailer weights:
7,782 lbs empty
3,241 lbs cargo
11,023 lbs GVWR

Last time I weighed trailer with load I was close to 10,000.

Again thank or replies.


Cheers

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 09/10/22 01:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So what exactly is your question? Sounds like you got 1000% more miles than 99% of everyone else and on your 3rd set of the same tires with hood success following many other before.
I’m confused.
But what I do know is for an estimated 9000lb tire load (tongue weight don’t count) 65 psi is about 10psi over minimum for the load and just about right.
Never hurts the tires to go stiffer higher pressure than needed, that’s all about ride and handling.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 09/10/22 01:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Mike134 wrote:

Lwiddis wrote:

Being one of the many, I disagree with BB. Just like eTrailer disagrees with BB. “I can end this debate for you real fast! Trailer tires, which will have an ST in front of the size, should always be inflated to the maximum psi indicated on the tire.” See https://www.etrailer.com/question-78836.html

A tire retailer advising its customers very clearly.


It's very clear they are salesmen of unknown knowledge about tires.

Then again you could check with the manufacturer who just might know a bit more.

https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf


Mike, you’re right. Widdis is out to lunch on this one.

profdant139

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Posted: 09/10/22 07:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bear in mind that the manufacturer has a strong incentive to provide you with the best and safest advice -- wrong advice leads to lawsuits!

So that is why I rely on the manufacturer on this issue -- not because I necessarily trust Goodyear, but because they are motivated to keep me safe.


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parcany

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Posted: 09/12/22 08:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Changed from d tires to e tires. Called makers of the rims, got told the rims are good for 80 psi. Got new tires and ran them at 80 psi, trailer did better on towing and just felt better.

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