RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Cargo trailers to tow behind an RV

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in General RVing Issues

Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > Cargo trailers to tow behind an RV

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
cptqueeg

Idaho

Senior Member

Joined: 04/11/2020

View Profile



Posted: 10/31/22 10:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for the helpful replies. I really should borrow or rent one and try it out. Obviously need to get the van scaled before I can make any decisions. Looks like the canoe is going on top of the van.

The van is working for us now, but we "camp" more than most #vanlifers, hence the need for extra gear.

blt2ski

Kirkland, Wa

Moderator

Joined: 03/15/2001

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/01/22 08:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'd do a 10' box, single axle in the 3500 minimum to preferred 5000 lb 6 lug with electric brakes on either axle capacity.
A 10' trailer you can put your 13' canoe on it with very little overhang on the trailer. Probably easier to get it onto the trailer vs sprinter. Those are 9.5' tall, vs a cargo trailer at 6-8' depending upon interior hieght.
A 12' box would be better, but that's as long of a single axle I would go. 14' us usually a dual 3500 lb axle trailer.
Your sprinter should have no issues towing a 3-5000 lb trailer assuming you have the payload for the 400-700 lbs of hitch weight. I drove one for work for 200k miles. Iirc it had around a 200/400 motor, 5 gears. If it now has one of the 6 or 8 sp trans that MB offers, you'll be better off yet. I believe GCWR was around 15000, which is on par for diesel pickups back in the day with similar speed motors.
I still wish we had sprinters vs the transits we have now. A much better designed van from a wieght carrying standpoint. I'd run down the road at 10-12k gvw with a 2500, performed fantastic.

Marty


92 Navistar dump truck, 7.3L 7 sp, 4.33 gears with a Detroit no spin
2014 Chevy 1500 Dual cab 4x4
92 Red-e-haul 12K equipment trailer

FLY 4 FUN

Alberta

Senior Member

Joined: 11/27/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/02/22 04:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have never towed a cargo trailer behind an rv but many buddies double tow behind 5er's. Their suggestion to me was to consider a 2 axle setup that makes a blowout an inconvenience vs an instant destabilizing event you may not see until its too late. I would be curious to hear others thoughts on this scenario.

Daryll


2012 Dodge Ram 3500 crew SB 4x4 CTD 3.73
2015 Brookstone 315RL
2009 Colorado 29BHS (sold 2015)
05 Jayflight 29BHS (sold 2008)
99 Jayco Eagle 12SO (sold 2005)

blt2ski

Kirkland, Wa

Moderator

Joined: 03/15/2001

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/03/22 10:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A SA trailer is generally speaking, no more destabilizing than a blow out on a vehicle with a single tire on it.
Granted a dual axle, you can remove the tire, tie the axle up and tow it to a repair yard......
Reality, you're screwed if you have a blow out of any sort. Not prepared to fix it your self, or not able to due to physical issues of some sort.

Marty

wnjj

Cornelius, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 01/11/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/03/22 11:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Single axle has the advantage of being easy to push/turn around by hand with a wheel under the jack. I've done that a few times in tight camp spots to stow the trailer.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/04/22 10:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

FLY 4 FUN wrote:

I have never towed a cargo trailer behind an rv but many buddies double tow behind 5er's. Their suggestion to me was to consider a 2 axle setup that makes a blowout an inconvenience vs an instant destabilizing event you may not see until its too late. I would be curious to hear others thoughts on this scenario.

Daryll


For sure, there is the issue or concern of not being able to see the trailer and dragging it some distance with a flat tire and potential ensuing damage from that.
However if worried about that, aftermarket TPMS systems are reasonably priced.
As far as a little single axle cargo trailer having a flat and causing a “destabilizing “ event, that’s mostly bunk. Maybe if you blew the outside tire in a high speed corner, but aside from that, the reason the first part of my reply is a concern is because it is literally hard to even notice there’s an issue if one doesn’t physically see it.


2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29 - Sold.
Couple of Arctic Fox TCs - Sold

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/04/22 10:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wnjj wrote:

Single axle has the advantage of being easy to push/turn around by hand with a wheel under the jack. I've done that a few times in tight camp spots to stow the trailer.


Agreed. And the OP doesn’t really have enough tow rig or enough gear to need a tandem axle trailer. More is not always better.

cptqueeg

Idaho

Senior Member

Joined: 04/11/2020

View Profile



Posted: 11/04/22 01:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My wife drives a considerable amount during our travels and it's exciting enough as it is. I can't imagine her reaction to a blow out on a SA trailer so the DA is strictly for my peace of mind. Tucking a SA trailer into position by hand is certainly a valuable asset.

wnjj

Cornelius, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 01/11/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/04/22 06:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

cptqueeg wrote:

My wife drives a considerable amount during our travels and it's exciting enough as it is. I can't imagine her reaction to a blow out on a SA trailer so the DA is strictly for my peace of mind. Tucking a SA trailer into position by hand is certainly a valuable asset.

The only trailer blowout I've had was with an open deck 2-place snowmobile trailer (~2k lbs). It was on the freeway at speed and I only noticed a slight tug which made me look in the mirror to see some smoke coming off the tire.

A trailer tire blowout is nothing to be concerned about from a stability point of view. It only increases drag on the hitch which is more stable not less.

ncrowley

Utah

Senior Member

Joined: 10/02/2009

View Profile






Posted: 11/05/22 06:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You have a hitch rated for 5000 pounds but I have not seen a Sprinter that should be pulling 5000 pounds. To calculate how much you can pull:

GCWR - GVWR = how much you should pull

You will probably be close to your GVWR with the Sprinters.


Nancy
Newmar Northern Star


Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > Cargo trailers to tow behind an RV
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in General RVing Issues


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2023 CWI, Inc. © 2023 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.