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Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > Tesla delivers there first semi

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blt2ski

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Posted: 12/03/22 12:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thermoguy wrote:

I guess Rivian beat them to the street. Rivian Amazon vans have already started deliveries in the Seattle area. Not that these are the same size, but for electric delivery vehicles, it looks like Rivian was first to make deliveries.


I was wondering who was making those vans. I've been seeing them for 6 months or so around Puget sound. Drive by a warehouse by Bremerton airport frequently with them heading out.

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rjstractor

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Posted: 12/03/22 02:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Pbutler97 wrote:

"its cargo carrying capacity compared to a diesel semi remains unknown to the public."

That's grrrrrreat!


It remains to be seen what the Tesla tractor's actual tare weight is, but much of what I've read indicates that it should be pretty competitive. The battery pack is said to weigh as much as 11,000 pounds, but a diesel truck's powertrain with 300 gallons of fuel weighs probably 5-6000 pounds. The electric semis get an extra 2000 pounds of allowable weight (can go up to 82K without additional axles) to help offset the heavy batteries. With use of lighter materials in the cab they might be able to get the weight within a couple thousand pounds. We'll see.

Huntindog

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Posted: 12/03/22 05:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

JRscooby wrote:

Bird Freak wrote:

Sounds good for a local truck but not for cross country.


I don't know about that. Many, if not most, LTL loads move terminal to terminal. 500 miles will most times be near the 11 hour driver daily limit, so terminals are spaced at about that. So spend up to 10 hours charging while trailer is reloaded. Ready for another day.
For sure would not be good for slip-sheet, or even slip-seat operations. Will need to put chargers in parking spots for irregular route operations, but will happen.


Yah good points. As well charging to 70 percent is 30 minutes and that last 30 percent wouldn’t take more than another 45 minutes. My guess is fleet operators will employ them where it makes sense.

As well not all loads will be at max which will extend range. A load of Doritos will weigh a lot less than a load of concrete curbs. As well not all routes have grades like the grapevine that the test trucks did.

We actually see this in real world with our smaller more aerodynamic trailer being towed by our tesla. (Picture below). Ford lightnings are struggling to get 120 kilometers of range pulling bigger heavier boxy travel trailers. We can tow double that range with an SUV that has a 30 percent smaller battery. I’m not knowledgeable about these things but I would assume that some of this physics carry’s thru to the big boys.

Jmho. Definitely not an expert.

[image]
I don't think Pepsi delivers much concrete. They do own Frito Lay, but at least in my area, they all run on CNG, which is pretty clean. The Pepsi trucks are Diesel and they all leave the plant with full loads.
Be interesting to see just how they use them.



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azdryheat

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Posted: 12/03/22 07:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

From the few studies I've seen it remains to be seen if there will be a total-cost-of-ownership advantage for fleet owners to switch to battery electric trucks. We'll see what they decide to buy.

NamMedevac 70

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Posted: 12/04/22 05:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

the EV semi tractor trailer truck rig weighs 81,000lbs. What will this do to our nation's highways and roads??? If anyone cares. Also according to financial news RIVIAN is doing very poorly financially and may be on last legs?????

JRscooby

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Posted: 12/04/22 07:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:



Yah good points. As well charging to 70 percent is 30 minutes and that last 30 percent wouldn’t take more than another 45 minutes. My guess is fleet operators will employ them where it makes sense.

As well not all loads will be at max which will extend range. A load of Doritos will weigh a lot less than a load of concrete curbs. As well not all routes have grades like the grapevine that the test trucks did.


LOL, before I retired I would whole lot more want to feed my Cat dragging a skateboard grossed out with the concrete curbs than a van cubed out with Doritos in most of the country.

I would sometimes "Power only" overflow loads for Buster Brown. Once I was waiting when a company driver dropped the trailer I was dispatched for return. The driver warned me it was heavy. I had 5th wheel set for 12-34 for max load. When hooked up my pressure gauge said I had less than 30 on drives, so have no idea what they would call light.

BTW, fuel stop was always over half hour off average speed.


Huntindog wrote:


I don't think Pepsi delivers much concrete. They do own Frito Lay, but at least in my area, they all run on CNG, which is pretty clean. The Pepsi trucks are Diesel and they all leave the plant with full loads.
Be interesting to see just how they use them.


PepsiCo also owns some fast food chains, so stocking them could be another job. I bet most of the trucks around here a probably loaded to gross for what they are. But the trailers are custom built to stack cases low enough to reach standing on the ground, and pick case withot reaching past others. 10 wheeled tractor/semi trailer likely maxed out at 52,000 if not leaving the commercial zone.

I have not paid much attention to what they are feeding the trucks. Be interesting to run numbers NG to E. Big roofs on warehouse. Could solar shade the roof? Charge batteries daytime, the battery charge trucks at night?

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Posted: 12/04/22 07:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NamMedevac 70 wrote:

the EV semi tractor trailer truck rig weighs 81,000lbs. What will this do to our nation's highways and roads??? If anyone cares. Also according to financial news RIVIAN is doing very poorly financially and may be on last legs?????


Hmmm. You may have misunderstood. That is the max allowable, which is 2000 more than the diesel version. It’s a couple percent more. Maybe I misunderstood your question.

Huntindog

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Posted: 12/04/22 07:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:

Reisender wrote:



Yah good points. As well charging to 70 percent is 30 minutes and that last 30 percent wouldn’t take more than another 45 minutes. My guess is fleet operators will employ them where it makes sense.

As well not all loads will be at max which will extend range. A load of Doritos will weigh a lot less than a load of concrete curbs. As well not all routes have grades like the grapevine that the test trucks did.


LOL, before I retired I would whole lot more want to feed my Cat dragging a skateboard grossed out with the concrete curbs than a van cubed out with Doritos in most of the country.

I would sometimes "Power only" overflow loads for Buster Brown. Once I was waiting when a company driver dropped the trailer I was dispatched for return. The driver warned me it was heavy. I had 5th wheel set for 12-34 for max load. When hooked up my pressure gauge said I had less than 30 on drives, so have no idea what they would call light.

BTW, fuel stop was always over half hour off average speed.


Huntindog wrote:


I don't think Pepsi delivers much concrete. They do own Frito Lay, but at least in my area, they all run on CNG, which is pretty clean. The Pepsi trucks are Diesel and they all leave the plant with full loads.
Be interesting to see just how they use them.


PepsiCo also owns some fast food chains, so stocking them could be another job. I bet most of the trucks around here a probably loaded to gross for what they are. But the trailers are custom built to stack cases low enough to reach standing on the ground, and pick case withot reaching past others. 10 wheeled tractor/semi trailer likely maxed out at 52,000 if not leaving the commercial zone.

I have not paid much attention to what they are feeding the trucks. Be interesting to run numbers NG to E. Big roofs on warehouse. Could solar shade the roof? Charge batteries daytime, the battery charge trucks at night?

Around here Pepsi does not supply their FF chains. In fact those are supplied by large box trucks. Not semis... The loads just are not large enough to justify a semi, and parking would be a big problem. FWIW, I used to manage a FF location.

Grit dog

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Posted: 12/04/22 08:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NamMedevac 70 wrote:

the EV semi tractor trailer truck rig weighs 81,000lbs. What will this do to our nation's highways and roads??? If anyone cares. Also according to financial news RIVIAN is doing very poorly financially and may be on last legs?????

What are you smokin?
Are you insinuating the tractor is 81k or they are capable of 81k gross? If the latter, thanks captain obvious. If the former, clean off your readers and stop spewing bs.


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Posted: 12/04/22 08:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here's video put out by Tesla for a fully loaded 500 mile run. I do find it interesting there's no passenger seat.

Link


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