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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > update cleaner 4 rubber roof

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Janny8

Florien LA

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Posted: 10/31/04 05:14pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for the spic and span and keeping dry spots stratagy.

I was considering renting a bucket from the electric company next time. grin.

The work your way back to the ladder thing brings to mind a question. Our RV does not have a ladder attached. I always use a regular ladder, I don't have room for one of the folding types. I see attachable ladders for sale in all the catalogs. I have been told that it is not a good idea to install a ladder unless it came that way from factory. The explanation is that some of the exteriors are not strong enough for a ladder and other horror stories about leaks etc.

I know I changed the subject mid stream but though some of you good folks might have some input.

02greyhawk

cumberland, md

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Posted: 10/30/04 08:50pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TPO AND EDPM?

Possumpoint

Virginia, USA

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Posted: 10/27/04 08:10am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

After owning my RV for a year, I felt it was time to wash the roof. Especially, since part of it sits under a white pine tree that makes a mess. I bought a RV rubber roof cleaner and conditioner by Thetford. It claims that it is nontoxic, nonflammable and biodegradable. It states that it contains surfactants which may irritate eyes.

Does anyone know if this product contains anything, with the above listed information, that will harm a rubber roof?

Thanks in advance.


2006 30MH24SL Bigfoot Class C
2003 Citation 32' Sky Deck TT
2003 Artic Fox #1140
Rick & Kathy, My best friend and wife for 38yrs
Rascal & Peewee(our furry children)

Westronics

Redmond, WA

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Posted: 10/27/04 08:53am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

More than you ever wanted to know about surfactants. I found this info at http://www.greatvistachemicals.com/surfactants_and_oleochemicals/ For what it's worth. It does not really answer the question, but it seems to be okay to me as long as there are no petrochemicals, which does seem to be the case.

Surfactants are also known as wetting agents. They may be liquids or powders. Surfactants are used in aqueous cleaners to provide detergency, emulsification, and wetting action. Surfactants used in aqueous cleaners are usually biodegradable. The various soils and parts used in your process and the concentrations of your cleaner will affect biodegradability. Lowering the surface tension of the cleaning solution helps the solution drain from the part being cleaned. Surfactants have several roles: they modify or "wet-out" the surface being cleaned or the soil being removed, and they help form an emulsion of solvent in water for cleaning or of soil in water for flushing away.

The four major classifications of surfactants are: anionic, cationic, nonionic, and amphoteric. Anionic surfactants are water soluble and have a negative charge in aqueous solution. Cationic surfactants have a positive charge in aqueous solution and are considered to be poor cleaners. Nonionic surfactants are the most widely used for surface cleaning and have no charge in aqueous solutions. Amphoteric surfactants develop a negative or positive charge depending on whether the solution is alkaline or acidic.

Anionic surfactants are used in laundry and hand dishwashing detergents; household cleaners; and personal cleansing products. They ionize (are converted to electrically charged particles) in solution, carry a negative charge, have excellent cleaning properties and generally are high sudsing. Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate, alcohol ethoxysulfates, alkyl sulfates and soap are the most common anionic surfactants.

Nonionic surfactants are low sudsing and are typically used in laundry and automatic dishwasher detergents and rinse aids. Because they do not ionize in solution and thus have no electrical charge, they are resistant to water hardness and clean well on most soils. The most widely used are alcohol ethoxylates. Nonionic surfactants are a class of synthetic surfactants. They are prepared by attaching ethylene oxide molecules to a water-insoluble molecule. The ethylene oxide molecules, derived from petroleum, are water-soluble polymers. Depending on the number of ethylene oxides and the number of carbon atoms, the synthetic surfactants can be classified as a wetting agent, a detergent, or an emulsifier.

Cationic surfactants are used in fabric softeners and in fabric-softening laundry detergents. Other cationics are the disinfecting/sanitizing ingredient in some household cleaners. They ionize in solution and have a positive charge. Quaternary ammonium compounds are the principal cationics.

Amphoteric surfactants are used in personal cleansing and household cleaning products for their mildness, sudsing and stability. They have the ability to be anionic (negatively charged), cationic (positively charged) or nonionic (no charge) in solution, depending on the pH (acidity or alkalinity) of the water. Imidazolines and betaines are the major amphoterics.

Janny8

Florien LA

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Posted: 10/28/04 11:55pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OK Folks, picture this

I realized my rubber roof was really dirty. I am 66 years old. I climbed up a ricotty ladder and had my husband hand me a hose and brush. I turned the hose on to rinse and wet. The *** roof got so slippery I was scared to walk around with the brush. I thought about inviting some kids up there for a water slide ride. I used regular rv cleaner. I am thinking "RV Glitter" something or other. I sat down to get a more steady stance. The shorts I was wearing will never come clean again. The "black" spots never did come off. It was a tiny bit cleaner than when I started. The bigest improvement was to the air condintioner cover and vents. At least it looks clean from the ground view.

So now you are indicating that I did more damage than good. Dang, it don't pay to be a clean nick. Laughing out loud.

By the way these same black spots are on the round rubber trim around the outside of the RV. I have tried everything no luck. The assist handle on the door gets worse every time I try to make it white again. So I guess I just have to learn that clean is not attainable huh??

HiTech

Texas

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Posted: 10/29/04 05:22am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My owner's manual says to use spic and span. I wash one section at a time keeping the rest of the roof dry, moving back toward the ladder.

I have only washed my roof once so far. It did cut down on the black streaks on the sides.

CurlyDave

Woodside, CA USA

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Posted: 10/13/04 12:00am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

After two years I might well do it for the first time.

I have to agree with this idea.

As far as I can tell , the only real reason for cleaning a rubber roof is to remove tree sap and/or darker colored dirt which will cause it to heat up the coach more from solar loading.

Plain water & a hose will remove a lot of sap from trees other than evergreens.

There are no "roof cleanliness police" and no one ever looks at the roof. I think cleaning with the wrong product or too vigorously is more damaging than no cleaning at all.


Kathy & Dave - kids: grown and gone - Yellow Labs: Amber & Crystal
2004 SunSeeker 2890 DS - RoadMaster dolly - 2004 Toyota Highlander


Westronics

Redmond, WA

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Posted: 10/13/04 09:03am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

...As far as I can tell , the only real reason for cleaning a rubber roof is to remove tree sap and/or darker colored dirt which will cause it to heat up the coach more from solar loading...


Cleaning a couple of times a year with Murphy's Oil Soap and a fairly soft brush (like a car wash brush on a broomstick) will also help dramatically reduce black streaks. Black streaking is simply water running off the roof leaving behind the residue from the dirty roof.

TPO and fiberglass roofs can be cleaned as often as you want, EDPM rubber roofs (the most common) should only be cleaned once or twice a year or you will reduce the life of the roof (perhaps not significantly, that's hard to say for sure).


2002 Jayco Greyhawk 24SS, Camera, ScanGauge, Inverter, Airtabs, Portabote, SeeLevel II, Tireman valves, Xatnrex Battery Monitor, Aero-flo vent, Trik-L-Start, XPS Rib, Chains, Lil' Stanker, Be kind to septic systems Ford: 1-800-444-3311. RV Tires


Greyeagle44F

Stratham NH USA

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Posted: 10/10/04 02:07pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Instructions from Dicor (which came with our MH) does recommend Murphy's Oil soap...it is what I will use.


The U.S. Military: "All gave some, some gave all."

The Ancient Aviator

2002 26Q Tioga, Michelin Sneakers, Front XPS, Rear LTX M/S, no chassis "gimmicks" (Wind Machine sold APR 2006...pushing my luck at 84 years and a high performance bird).

hud3ma

N. Cen. PA via Ware, Herts, England, UK

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Posted: 10/10/04 07:48pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Those "Greased Lightening" products are nasty!! We've even used them to remove powder coating from steel and no one uses them with wearing nitrile gloves. I would definitely NOT recommend them as rubber roof cleaners. Simple Green is about as harsh as I'll go.


Mike & Karen
...and Ziggy, the Golden Retriever

2002 THOR (Dutchmen) 25' Class C w/slide


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