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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > Class C without dinghy?

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Buffaloman45

Spring Valley, IL., USA

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Posted: 11/15/05 01:48am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We're thinking of buying a 29' Coachmen Class C... but we don't want to tow a dinghy. Is this feasible? Anybody do it? Is parking at points-of-interest been a problem? What do you thing?


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mnpedwards

Germantown Hills, IL

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Posted: 11/15/05 04:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We bought our Class C this spring & haven't setup a dinghy yet. We've taken about 7 trips since, and we've handled it in a few different ways. We've not taken a car (when we're just hanging around the CG), my wife has followed me to the CG in her car (short trips), and we've rented cars locally (as with our trip to Colorado this summer - we stopped off at Denver Airport). We're leaving for a week in St Augustine Saturday, and we have a car reserved in Jacksonville. (Personally, I don't like the thought of unhooking, packing up, and driving the motor home around, just to hook it back up later.)

ct78barnes

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Posted: 11/15/05 04:25am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have a 29 ft Jayco and have had it for two years . It is all set up for towing but we have not towed with it. I towed a traveled trailer for 8 years and like to be able to take off at the turn of the key. We have went to outlets and big malls and I just take up two spaces way out in the parking lot . On our big trip to Myrtle Beach we rented a car for 150.00 for the whole week . They came and picked us up at the campground and droves us back at the end of the week . It can be done and on our local trips less than 50 miles I have the wife and kids come up after I get it set up. Next year I might start towing then again maybe not.

minnie26a

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Posted: 11/15/05 04:30am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As long as your willing to set up camp outside and take it back down, or at least partially down, and unhook your utilities more often, its no problem.


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HiTech

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Posted: 11/15/05 05:53am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This is the only way we have ever motorhomed. We have never towed a dinghy. It has many advantages though you want to get efficient at making and breaking camp. A great way to do it is to tour - stay in spots for only 1-3 nights, which is a new way of thinking for many who come to motorhomes from trailers.

Each time you move sites, you resupply, do laundry, go see the sights...etc. When you do these things it is a lot easier since you have all your things right with you.

Or you can stay at one site longer and not put more stuff out then you need, so packing up is easy. When I go to conventions with my boys we take the motorhome for transportation and lodging. Each night we go to the camp ground and just do hookups which takes 5 minutes. In the morning we drive to the conventions (all in downtown areas) and park on a side street. All day long we have our house with us so if one son was not ready, he can hang out, take a shower, eat breakfast and come in when he is ready. I might come back mid day and watch TV or take a nap. In the evening we head back and start all over.

If you want to dig in trailer camping style, you can have another adult drive along a second vehicle if you are staying nearby, or rent one when you get there (often for less than the .5-1 mpg penalty of towing if far from home). Many camp grounds know of one or more car rental companies that will come right to the camp ground to get you.

The trick in using a motorhome as a camper and transportation is simply never pull into anywhere you don't know how to get out of. That includes large parking lots where others may later come in and park around you. I like to park on end spaces where pulling away is a straight shot.

Most points of interest have bus parking or accept truck deliveries, and I find even with my long overhang in back I can easily get into places designed to accomodate busses or semis.

* This post was edited 11/15/05 07:42am by HiTech *

Art D

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Posted: 11/15/05 06:01am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a 31' Class A and don't tow anything. I have done all of the described above. Some "road trips" we take for a week and travel and see the sights one day and spend the next day resting at a CG. If there's a decent parking lot, I somehow get in and out. If it's just for a weekend, I go to a state park and just relax. If it's somewhere like Branson or Gatlingburg for most of a week, we rent.


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j-d

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Posted: 11/15/05 07:25am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I see them all the time. Lots of out of state C's in campgrounds toadless. We met folks in Alaska who took their 40' DP up without their toad. We offered to drive them to the sightseeing day boat and they said "no need". We drove down that way later and there was that huge coach, fitted into the parking lot. So in most cases I'd offer that it's more a matter of willingness and confidence than physical dictates of the coach size. Look where the big delivery trucks go.
Clear no-toad benefits are maneuverability and fuel mileage. Also no doubt less risk of (and concern about) a toad-related accident. Like an accidental disconnect or somebody sideswiping the toad thinking the lane was clear once the coach passed.
I think another part of this issue is how "heavy a packer" you are. If you're like us, we set up so much stuff in the coach once we set up that we avoid moving it at all costs till we're ready to leave that location. How you go about leveling and how quickly you can do it will figure into how much you'd see moving your coach as an annoyance.
I don't know how you measure this, but if you find you're sitting on the site and realize moving the coach is keeping you from enjoying the local area, then it's time to consider getting some kind of wheels, towed, rented, whatever.


If God's Your Co-Pilot Move Over, jd
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HiTech

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Posted: 11/15/05 07:48am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good points JD - We do not set up anything inside the motorhome any differently when traveling than when at a site. We start vacation the moment we putt out of the driveway, and we have added a lot of little storage racks by the seats to keep gameboys, books...etc in. Spices in the kitchen are in the same little spice racks all the time. They go there all the time. Towels are on towel hooks all the time - they do not come out just when stopped. We try not to store anything in the shower, oven ...etc that we would just have to move back an forth.

Leveling is another good point. 90+% of the time I level by using the level I have up front in the cab, and driving across the site until it reads level, or level enough. No boards, jacks...etc. I also go for pull through sites when I can get them, though backing in is no problem. Again another time saver. I have tried to set up everything in the motorhome so that the configuration is the same whether driving down the road or parked.

jojolou

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Posted: 11/15/05 08:10am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We own a 31 ft. class C and have decided to tow a dinghy. We did most of the above, including renting a vehicle at the campground if we were staying awhile. What really pushed us into towing was wanting to "snowbird" this winter. The thought of breaking camp everytime we needed to leave for groceries, church, sightseeing, medical problems, or whatever, was more than I cared for! Renting a car for several months becomes pricy after awhile. I guess it's just how much hassle you are willing to endure. It only takes a few minutes to hook up the toad when leaving and even less time unhooking when arriving. If you intend on traveling a lot, I think towing 4 down is something you should seriously consider.

jojolou


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TonyMin

Walnut Creek CA

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Posted: 11/15/05 08:11am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We bought our first MH in March and did about 6 or 7 trips so far and we never tow. Ours is just under 30' and we go everywhere in it. We boondock mostly but when we stay at a campground it is usually a destination one that we chose because of it's location right next to the attraction, (Disneyland for instance). We love having everything with us. It is not really that much harder to drive around and we rarely have trouble finding parking spots. At the supermarket we usually angle such that we take 3 spots.
I guess it will depend on your way of camping. If you plan to stay at a campground for a week and it is in the middle of nowhere it would be pretty tough without transportation. But if you stay places for only a few days at a time before you move on you can just resupply and sightsee as you move to your next spot. That is what we prefer. It gets kinda boring to just stay in one spot too long.


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